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A Flip-Flopping Climate Could Explain Mars's Watery Past

11/1/2016

In the 1970s, images of Mars taken by the Mariner and Viking spacecraft revealed enormous channels and valley networks—both of which are reminiscent of catastrophic floods and river drainage systems on Earth. The fluvial features were the first sign that 3.8 billion years ago, the planet was once a lush oasis, awash with oceans, lakes, and rivers.

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Lunar Lion team recruits geosciences students to create science plan for moon

10/31/2016

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — When you look into the night sky a few years from now, you might be saying to yourself, "There’s a vehicle built by Penn State students on the moon right now." That voyage to the moon is the focus of the student-run Lunar Lion team’s efforts, and they recently brought on two new team members — both geosciences majors — to help plan the team’s lunar research.

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Q&A: Lexi Jamieson Marsh and Ellen Currano: Face to face

10/31/2016

 Outside the hall containing the posters and exhibits at last month's Geological Society of America meeting in Denver, Colorado, was a surprise. A travelling photography exhibition displayed large, black-and-white portraits of women — wearing beards. To challenge perceptions of who is and is not a scientist, the Bearded Lady Project (www.thebeardedladyproject.com) has photographed more than 75 female Earth scientists; a documentary will be released in early 2017.

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New research on ancient Alpine rocks may unveil clues to Earth's evolution

10/25/2016

 High up in the Western Alps is a swath of rocks that could provide new insight into what happens deep in the Earth's subsurface. A new $4.2 million initiative, known as the ExTerra Field Institute and Research Endeavor (E-FIRE), will allow researchers from nine U.S. institutions to conduct in-depth analyses of these rocks, which will improve our understanding of the forces governing activity beneath the crust and help us better understand the Earth's evolution.

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Russo named Slingerland Early Career Professor in geosciences

10/18/2016

Tess Russo, assistant professor of geosciences in the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (EMS), has been named the Rudy L. Slingerland Early Career Professor of Geosciences for her early career achievements in teaching, research and service.

The professorship was created through a gift from Roland P. and Debra C. Sauermann and named in honor of Rudy L. Slingerland, professor emeritus of geology in the Department of Geosciences.

“I was thrilled when I heard that the department wanted to help to fund my research,” said Russo.

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