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Alumni Field Camp

Alumni Field Camp

 

Clark's Fork Canyon,  Wyoming

Clark's Fork Canyon,  Wyoming. Credit: Phil Norbeck


Penn State Field Geology has been and continues to be a capstone experience that integrates previously-studied subdisciplines of the geosciences and facilitates visualization of geologic history from outcrops in the canyons, mountains, and plains of the American West. For 2006, the camp was shifted to the environs of Coldigioco in the Apennines of Italy. The course is built around a series of intensive mapping projects that require solution of geologic puzzles with all the tools and concepts at the student's command.

But field camp is also fun in other ways. A group of people have to live, work, and play together through wind, rain, sun, cold, vehicle breakdowns, deadlines, dirty laundry, and everything else that goes with a journey that lasts many weeks and involves different living venues. Ultimately they find joy in their shared trials and triumphs. Walter Ebaugh (1971 field camp) has summed it up: "It was surely the best. I learned almost everything I know about geology that summer."

If you remember field camp that way, these webpages are designed to let you reminisce but also to reconnect with your past alumni friends.  If you would like to contribute to any Field Camp pages please contact us

In addition to those named on individual pages, general thanks to Barry Voight, Derrill Kerrick, Rudy Slingerland, Kevin (Doc) Hoover and, especially, Duff Gold for photographs and materials.

 

Fanshawe Lodge, YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana

Fanshawe Lodge, YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana

 Field Camp Alumni 1919-1954

1925 Field Camp, probably in Bedford County. Credit: Rudy Slingerland

Field Camp 1919-1954
Staff in University Archives in Paterno Library were very helpful in finding materials for this article and in scanning photographs.

1919-1939: The Bedford County Years

The General Catalog of The Pennsylvania State College first listed a summer field geology course, that lasted more than one week, in 1919-1920.  The Geology Department in the School of Mines (later Mines and Metallurgy) required a three-week course in Geologic Surveying in the summer and Field Geology during the Fall Semester of the senior year.  Those requirements stayed the same until 1932-1933, when both the School name and the course requirements changed.  The course, Summer Field Geology, became eight weeks in length and was required for the Geology Curriculum in the School of Mineral Industries.  The first three weeks of that course were the same as Geologic Surveying, a course that was also required for the Curriculum in Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering.  Those requirements remained the same until 1942-1943.  At least some of those summers were in Bedford County.  A February 16, 1932 clipping (University Archives): "Geology Students of Pennsylvania State College and those engaged in studying petroleum production are making plans to attend the Penn State summer geology camp which will be established again in Bedford County.  The camp will open June 7 and continue to June 28 for the petroleum engineers and to July 31 for the geologists.  Professor C A Bonine, Head of the Department of Geology, will be in charge of camp and field instruction.  The students in camp last year mapped surface strata, and this year they will study formations of the underlying Silurian beds."  Prof. Chesleigh A Bonine (EM, Lehigh '12) came to Penn State in 1918 and established the summer field course (University Archives).  He was also Geology Department Head from 1923 until his retirement in 1947.

Prof Chesleigh A Bonine
Professor C A Bonine says something is wrong with the map of John Ferm.  May, 1945.  Credit: Bob Folk

1940-1960: The Stone Valley Years

In 1942-1943 an Earth Sciences Department was formed with Geology, Meteorology, Geophysics, and Geography.  All four Curricula required Geologic Surveying and in addition Summer Field Geology for the Geology Curriculum and Geophysical Field Work for the Geophysics Curriculum.  Those requirements were the same until the 1946-1948 Catalog. 

Michael Bezilla, in Penn State: An Illustrated History, writes: "Several departments in the schools of Engineering, Mineral Industries, and Agriculture needed land for summer camps and other field work. In 1940 the Hetzel administration signed a lease for 4,500 acres of forest and farm land in Stone Valley, Huntingdon County, about fifteen miles southwest of State College. The United States Department of Agriculture's Farm Security Administration had acquired the land several years earlier as part of a plan to relocate families from submarginal farm land. The USDA then leased the property to the Pennsylvania Department of Forests and Waters, which in turn subleased a tract to Penn State for 99 years. A lodge, reservoir, access roads, and other improvements costing over $35,000 were made jointly by the College and the federal Soil Conservation Service."  Records in University Archives show that the Mineral Industries Lodge, a wood frame structure with 4,398 sq ft over two stories and a porch, was constructed in 1938, the same year that the Forestry Lodge was built.  The Civil Engineering Lodge, across Stone Creek, was built two years later.
     Today the Forestry Lodge is the Environmental Center.  The MI Lodge became park headquarters in 1960 and burned to the ground in 1980.  The CE Lodge still exists and is used for group affairs by Stone Valley.

The 1946-1948 Catalog was the first specifically to mention the Mineral Industries Lodge. "Exceptional displays of folded and faulted strata in central Pennsylvania provide an inspiring, as well as instructive, natural geological laboratory of which use is made by the organized field excursions and special studies of the regular College courses, and by summer work at the Mineral Industries Camp.  The main lodge of the camp, in its attractive, woodland setting, is adjoined by permanent sleeping cabins; equipment includes plane tables, alidades, and Paulin altimeters."  That Catalog also sets forth a revised academic structure, with an Earth Sciences Department that had Curricula in Geology-Mineralogy and Geophysics-Geochemistry.  Geology-Mineralogy students took summer Geologic Surveying and Field Geology, whereas Geophysics-Geochemistry took only Geologic Surveying.  The Field Geology course included three weeks at the MI Camp and a one week tour.  Prof. Bonine continued as MI Camp Director.

The courses established in 1946-48 remained in place in 1948-1950.  John Eliot Allen (PhD, Berkeley '34) was Summer Camp Director from 1946-1949.  In 1951-1952 the Geophysics-Geochemistry requirements were extended to include Field Geophysics.  Philip H Osberg (PhD, Harvard '52) was Director of the Geology Summer Camp in 1952-1953, and in 1954-1955 Wakefield Dort, Jr. (PhD, Stanford '55) was Director of the Mineral Industries Camp.

     Over the years between 1940 and 1960, field camp students mapped in the Allensville, Alum Bank, Bedford, Donation, McAlevys Fort, Ogletown, Pine Grove Mills, and Schellsburg quadrangles.  This work was incorporated into the map Bedrock Geology of Pennsylvania issued by the Pennsylvania Geological Survey.  For a discussion of the close of Stone Valley as the field camp site, click here for the 1960 page.

Prof SwainProfessor Fred M Swain (MS Penn State '39, PhD Kansas '43) taught at the field school in 1949 and was Director in 1950.  He went on to the University of Minnesota and is an international expert on ostracods.  He writes: "The field program at Stone Valley Camp was begun by Prof. Bonine and continued by John Eliot Allen, who left for Portland State about 1949.  The students were put in groups of four.  Sections of Ordovician, Silurian, and Devonian rocks around Huntingdon and Mount Union were measured and described, while field methods were learned: Brunton compass, plane table use, air photo and topo sheets, etc.  Graduate student assistants plus the director constituted the teaching staff, but we occasionally had someone come out to give specialized instruction. I believe both Profs. Krynine and Swartz did this.
      The work area in the lodge was used for daily map updates, discussions, microscopic and hand specimen work on lithologic and paleontologic material.  A lot of the mapping involved soil interpretation, topographic expression, dip and strike structural  studies, and structural cross-section sketches.  Transparent overlays were used on the air photos  The students in each party ended with a map common to the  party.  These were combined, as I recall, at the end for the whole area, and  each student wrote a report, due any time prior to the beginning of fall term. The last week or so, if time permitted, was spent going to various well-known geologic features in Pennsylvania such as Cornwall, anthracite strip mines, and Delaware Water Gap.
      The camp area was kept up by university landscapers.  There was a central lodge with a big dining room, kitchen, and map work area on the second floor.  A local couple did the cooking and servicing of the lodge.  There were eight cabins housing staff and students.  The director and family had one cabin.

 

 

Click on the thumbs to enlarge:

 

Alumni Field Camp Before 1955 Photos
       
Geology class field trip, Oct 1914. Penn State Archives
Geology class field trip, Oct 1914. Penn State Archives
Geology class field trip, Oct 1914. Penn State Archives
GSc 470 class at Whipple Dam, 1960s. Penn State Archives
Field camp in1922 in Bedford County. Penn State Archives
Field camp in 1922 in Bedford County. Penn State Archives
Camping at field camp in Bedford County, 1922. Penn State Archives
Picture from the 1953 Mineral Industries Bulletin. Penn State Archives
Plane table surveying, probably in the 1950s or 60s. Penn State Archives
Mineral Industries Lodge, built 1938. Penn State Archives
Mineral Industries Lodge, side. Penn State Archives
John C Ferm on the alidade. Geology field camp, May 1945
2006 view of the site of the MI Lodge, which burned to the ground in 1980.
Civil Engineering camp, Stone Valley, late 1930s
CE Lodge, 2006
CE Lodge across Lake Perez from the MI Camp area, 2006
Lake Perez, 2006

Field Camp Alumni 1940-1954 Students
Two to-be-eminent geologists at field camp, Spring 1944.  Alison R (Pete) Palmer and John C Ferm. Credit: Bob Folk

Some Students Who Attended Field Camp at Stone Valley, 1940-1954

Robert L (Bob) Folk B.S. 1946, M.S. 1950; Ph.D. 1952, for which he worked with Krynine.  The father of carbonate petrology and since 1990 a researcher in fossil nanobacteria, he taught and is still at the University of Texas.

John C Ferm (1925-1999) B.S., 1946; M.S., 1948; Ph.D. 1957, for which he worked with Krynine and Griffiths. While at the 1946 Penn State geology field camp, he met Doris Lippencott Bye, a master's candidate in geology, who would become his wife and life-long companion.  A sedimentary and coal geologist, he taught at LSU, South Carolina, and Kentucky.

Alison R (Pete) Palmer 1945.  A former U.S. Geological Survey paleontologist and State University of New York at Stony Brook geology professor, he arrived in Boulder in 1980 to begin work organizing the Geological Society of America's 40- volume "Decade of North American Geology," for the society's centennial in 1988. It spans eight feet of bookshelf and involved authors and others from more than 100 universities, 20 provincial and state geological surveys and 23 oil or mining companies or consulting firms in 18 countries.  "My friends thought I was mad, but it was great fun," Palmer has said. 

David C Scull 1954,BS1955.  Dave is an External Aerospace Education Officer, Virginia Wing, CAP.  He reminds us that "Education is what remains after one has forgotten everything he learned in school." - Albert Einstein

 

Field Camp 1955
From a 1955 Geology-Mineralogy Open House publication. Penn State archives

Field Camp 1955

Students
In 1955 the Curriculum (Department) of Geology-Mineralogy required summer Geologic Surveying (Geol 70) and Field Geology (Geol 72).  The Curriculum (Department) of Geophysics-Geochemistry required Geol 70 and Field Geophysics (GG 403).  This list from the database of 1955 and 1956 Geol Sci and Geophysics-Geochemistry alumni hopefully contains the names of field camp attendees
, although some may have attended a year earlier or a year later. 

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Thomas Davis  
Joseph J Durek  
David K Fenstermacher  
Frederick A Lender  
Gerald K Moore  
John H Rowland (PhD 66)  
Theodore O Schmidt  
Donald A Smith  
Lewis C Wade  
Richard I Waite, Jr.  
James E Walczak  
Eugene W White (MS 58, PhD 65)  

 

Faculty
   Wakefield Dort, Jr., Director of the Mineral Industries Camp

Where They Stayed
    Mineral Industries Lodge, Stone Valley, Huntingdon County, PA (see the 1919-1954 and 1960 pages)

Projects
   See 1960 page

 

Field Camp 1956

Students
In 1956 the Curriculum (Department) of Geology-Mineralogy required summer Geologic Surveying (Geol 70) and Field Geology (Geol 72).  The Curriculum (Department) of Geophysics-Geochemistry required Geol 70 and Field Geophysics (GG 403).  This list from the database of 1957 Geol Sci alumni hopefully contains the names of field camp attendees
, although some may have attended a year earlier or a year later. 

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Walter M Cox  
Ellis Donsky  
John E Drake, Jr.  
Richard H Johnston  
Robert S Pocreva  
Dean C Presnall (PhD 63)  
Charles S Smith  
Donald W Strickler (MS 59)  
Robert A Umberger  
Alfred E Williams  
Donald L Woodrow  


Geology Field Course Program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty
   Wakefield Dort, Jr., Director of the Mineral Industries Camp

Where They Stayed
    Mineral Industries Lodge, Stone Valley, Huntingdon County, PA (see the 1919-1954 and 1960 pages)

Projects
   See 1960 page

Photo to left
  A 1950s one-page flyer for the Field School. Penn State Archives

 

 

 

Field Camp 1957
From the 1956 Mineral Industries College Bulletin. Penn State Archives

Field Camp 1957

Students
In 1957 the Curriculum (Department) of Geology-Mineralogy required summer Geologic Surveying (Geol 70) and Field Geology (Geol 72).  The Curriculum (Department) of Geophysics-Geochemistry required Geol 70 and Field Geophysics (GG 403).  This list from the database of 1958 Geol Sci alumni hopefully contains the names of field camp attendees
, although some may have attended a year earlier or a year later. 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Gregory Baron  
James D Hedberg  
Roy H Herlocher, Jr.  
John J Kelley  
James F Lander  
Joseph R Motto  
Emil Onuschak, Jr.  
Joseph M Pugliese  
James M Stratton  
Frank E Wedekind  
Roy E Willie, Jr.  
 
 

Faculty
   Wakefield Dort, Jr., Director of the Mineral Industries Camp

Graduate assistant
     Gene Williams (PhD '57)

Where They Stayed
    Mineral Industries Lodge, Stone Valley, Huntingdon County, PA (see the 1919-1954 and 1960 pages)

Projects
   See 1960 page

 

 

Field Camp 1958
From the 1956 Mineral Industries College Bulletin. Penn State Archives

Field Camp 1958

Students
In 1958 the Curriculum (Department) of Geology-Mineralogy required summer Geologic Surveying (Geol 70) and Field Geology (Geol 72).  The Curriculum (Department) of Geophysics-Geochemistry had two options -- Geophysics that required Geol 70 and Field Geophysics (GG 430) and Geochemistry that only required Geol 70.  This list from the database of 1959 Geol Sci alumni hopefully contains the names of field camp attendees
, although some may have attended a year earlier or a year later. 

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Frederick N App  
Ronald J Conklin  
William R England  
Karl E Francis  
Preston K Hayes  
Andrew H Jazwinski  
Robert J Kopicki  
Eugene A Margerum  
Walter Mitronovas  
Charles W Racer, Jr.  
William G Rauschenberger  
George A Savanick (MS61)  
David l Schleicher  
George A Sellers  
David G Towell  

 

Faculty

   We don't know who taught the field school in 1958.  Gene Williams (PhD 57) assisted.

Where They Stayed

    Mineral Industries Lodge, Stone Valley, Huntingdon County, PA (see the 1919-1954 and 1960 pages)

Projects
   See 1960 page

 

 

Anticline in the Castanea, Whipple Dam
Anticline in the Castanea Member of the Tuscarora Formation, Whipple Dam

Field Camp 1959

Students
In 1959 the Curriculum (Department) of Geology-Mineralogy required summer Geologic Surveying (Geol 70) and Field Geology (Geol 72).  The Curriculum (Department) of Geophysics-Geochemistry had two options -- Geophysics and Geochemistry, both of which only required Geol 70.  Most of these names are from the database of 1960 Geological Sciences, Geology, and Geology-Mineralogy alumni that, hopefully, is a proxy for 1959 field camp
, although some may have attended a year earlier or a year later.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Lamont S Beers  
Frank V DiMarcello  
Peter A Dunn  
William M Flock (PhD 66)  
Philip Heckel (Amherst College)  
William H Hedberg (MS 63)  
Allan R Larson  
Thomas L Miller  
Terry A Shepherd  
Jan G Smith  
Charles B Willingham  
Samuel B (Sam) Romberger (PhD68)  
Gerald P Duckett  

 

Faculty

   Robert L (Bob) Ellison (PhD 61).  Bob was a long-time faculty member at the University of Virginia.

Where They Stayed
    Mineral Industries Lodge, Stone Valley, Huntingdon County, PA (see the 1919-1954 and 1960 pages)

Projects
   See 1960 page

Sam Romberger says he remembers that Larry Lattman came out to give evening lectures, because Larry caught him dozing.

Phil Heckel adds that "I am glad to be included in the PSU Stone Valley Field Camp alumni group, because my experience there helped to solidify my decision to go to graduate school in Geology."  Phil went on to obtain a PhD at Rice and teaches at the University of Iowa.

 

Field Camp Alumni 1960
The Mineral Industries Lodge at Stone Valley was built in 1938 and was used for field camps until 1960.  It burned in 1980. In this undated photo of a geology field camp, Prof. P.D. Krynine is at the right.  Source: Penn State Archives

Field Camp 1960

Students
In 1960 the Curriculum (Department) of Geology-Mineralogy required summer Geologic Surveying (Geol 70) and Field Geology (Geol 72).  The Curriculum (Department) of Geophysics-Geochemistry had two options -- Geophysics and Geochemistry, both of which only required Geol 70.  Most of these names are from the database of 1961 Geological Sciences or Geology-Mineralogy alumni that, hopefully, is a proxy for 1960 field camp
, although some may have attended a year earlier or a year later.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
G Michael Clark  
Jack E Hendricks  
Jay J Hill  
Stephen M Irving  
Stephen A Kirsch (see below)  
Ron Landon (MS 63)  
Bruce K McEuen  
Harold McGoldrick, Jr. (see below)  
Michael M Michlik  
David B Mooney  
Thomas A Ogden, Jr.  
Jeffrey R Parsons (see below)  
Otis D Slagle  
Bill Stutzman  
James R Tedrick  
Adrian Paul Visocky (see below)  
James E (Jim) Walker  
James R White (MS 66)  
Ronald W Wiegman  

 

Faculty
   Dr. Malcolm P Weiss (Ohio State), George MacKenzie (MS 62), Gene Williams (PhD '57)

Where They Stayed
   Mineral Industries Lodge, Stone Valley, Huntingdon County, PA (see also the 1919-1954 page)

Projects
   Over time, field camp students mapped in the Allensville, Alum Bank, Bedford, Donation, McAlevys Fort, Ogletown, Pine Grove Mills, and Schellsburg quadrangles.  This work was incorporated into the map Bedrock Geology of Pennsylvania.

History
     In 1940, The Pennsylvania State College entered into agreement with State and Federal Agencies to use forested lands and to develop roads in Stone Valley for the College's educational programs. Subsequently, the Mineral Industries, Forestry, and Civil Engineering Lodges were built to accommodate summer field courses taught by those departments. In 1954, the Federal government deeded the land over to the University, and in 1957 a Stone Valley Management Committee initiated plans to construct a dam across Shaver's Creek. The dam was started on June 15, 1957 and completed on January 11, 1960.  With the completion of the dam, creating Lake Perez, and the allocation of 574 acres of land in the Stone Valley Tract for recreational development, the Stone Valley Recreation Area was initiated. By 1960 the MI Lodge had already been redesignated the Main Administration Building.  A year later, the Department of Civil Engineering, School of Forestry, and the Geosciences Department transferred their control of the facilities to the college of Health and Physical Education, now the Intercollegiate Athletics Department.

Probably because of the facility transfer, 1960 was the final year that Field Camp was held at Stone Valley or in Pennsylvania.  In 1961 the field school moved to Montana.

Jeff Parsons remembers that in 1960 "between our Junior and Senior years, Steve Kirsch, Paul Visocky, Harry McGoldrick and I went out to the University of Wyoming field camp based at Centennial, Wyoming. I recall that Frank Swartz was a little annoyed with us because we weren't going to the Penn State field camp at Stone Valley that year. At the end of the 1960 Univ. of Wyoming session I went up to work with Rob Scholten along the Continental Divide out of Dubois, Idaho (the Lone Pine Inn) and adjacent Montana for about a month. There was no formal PSU field camp there that summer, but Larry Ramspott and Jan Smith were both there working on their doctoral and MS theses, respectively. I was a general field assistant working with Scholten.  The first western PSU field camp was the following summer, in 1961."

Jim Walker on the 1960 Field Camp at Stone Valley

Jim WalkerJim Walker writes "Field Camp 1960.  It's been almost fifty years (or was it just yesterday?), and some of my recollections are a bit fuzzy, but here goes.  I dug out my old Geology Field Book, No. 1G, and some maps and sketches for a 'refresher.'  The field school actually was in two parts.  The first session, which started about June 12 or 13, included Geology & Mineralogy and Geophysics & Geochemistry students.  There may have been some others, but my notes don't say.  This first session lasted 2-3 weeks, after which all students other than G&M left camp.  There were several instructors for this initial course.  Activities included plane table mapping, pace-compass mapping, Brunton compass instruction, Stone Valley area geology, formation ID, etc.  The only instructor name I know for sure was a grad student, George MacKenzie.  I think that Frank Swartz spent some time on the paleontology in regard to formation identification.

The instructor for the second part of the field school was Dr. M P Weiss from Ohio State University.  He arrived at camp around the end of June, accompanied by his wife and two grade school-age daughters.  He may have also been there in 1959 and earlier, but I don't know.

The 1961 class of Geology & Mineralogy numbered about 16.  My notes don't show how many students stayed on for the second session -- maybe seven to nine.  The names of those I do recall from this session are: Ron Landon, Bruce McEuen, Dave Mooney, Bill Stutzman, and myself.  There were also several students who went West with Rob Scholten.

The cabins at the old MI camp in Stone Valley are still in use as is, I believe, the bathhouse/laundry facility.  The main lodge was situated between the two rows of cabins adjacent to the bathhouse.  The ground floor had a dining room with a large stone fireplace, kitchen, and, as I recall, a lounge.  The second floor had a couple of large work rooms with drafting tables. 

We were organized in teams, each team consisting of two students.  Each team was assigned a university station wagon along with a number of gasoline credit cards.  Each team was then assigned a different area and charged with producing a geological map of that area including appropriate columnar and x-sections.  My team's area was about 80 square miles. We also had to submit a comprehensive report on our area.  We had until about the end of July to submit our work (about 4-5 weeks).  Dr. Weiss would divide his time amongst the teams or otherwise help where needed.

A typical day began with breakfast followed by making up a lunch from a very generous selection of sandwich makings, fruit, etc. that were laid out on the large round oak dining room table.  The entire day was usually spent in the field.  Dinner was at 6:00 p.m.  The weather a I recall was very good all the time we were in camp.  Most evenings were spent working on our report and map.  Sometimes we would go to Charter Oak to a small diner for coffee.  The building is still there but is now a private home.  Weekends were 'free time' -- just be sure you were back in camp by Monday morning. 

Camp broke up around the end of July.  The maps we produced should still be somewhere in the Geosciences library.  The reports were returned to us with comments and our course grade.  I still have mine."

DHE: Malcolm P Weiss received his PhD from Minnesota in 1953.  A stratigrapher, he taught at Ohio State 1952-1967, also directing their field school in Ephraim, Utah, several years.  He was founding chairman of the Geology Department at Northern Illinois University from 1967-1988.  He died in 2001.

 

 

Rob Scholten and a Penn State field geology class in Montana
Rob Scholten and a field class in Montana. Date unknown. Penn State Archives

Field Camp 1961

Students
In 1961 the old Curricula of Geology-Mineralogy and Geophysics-Geochemistry were changed to a Geological Sciences Curriculum, with Departments of Geology, Geophysics-Geochemistry, and Mineralogy.  GSc 470, Introduction to Field Geology, was introduced in the 9th Term, and Field Geology (GSc 472) was taught as a summer course in the West.  It is unclear, from the University General Catalog, which majors were required to take GSc 472, but probably geophysicists were not.  Most of these names are from the database of 1962 Geological Sciences alumni that, hopefully, is a proxy for 1961 field camp
, although some may have attended a year earlier.
     The camp of 1961 was the first held outside Pennsylvania, probably because of transfer of Stone Valley facilities to the College of Health and Physical Education and because Rob Scholten had an ongoing mapping program in southwestern Montana.  Read the remarks of Jeff Parsons on the transition to Montana.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Edward A Gesty  
Robert J Hessler  
David H Marshall  
Dwight G Moore, Jr.  
Richard C Nau  

 

Faculty

Rob Scholten



Where They Stayed
  
Little Sheep Creek Campground west of Lima, Montana (see the 1963 page)

Main Projects
   Mapping in the Tendoy Range
 

 

 

Malcolm Stewart and Lynn Brant on the Penn State Geology Field Camp 1962
Malcolm Stewart and Lynn Brant on the return trip from Lima, Montana in 1962. Thanks to Lynn Brant, who says "Notice the cage sitting inside the cardboard box on the ground.  That was the squirrel we brought home [see his story].  I wonder how many laws we broke by moving wildlife around the country like that.... Malcolm and I had beards we displayed for a week in Butte [where they were stranded when their van broke down -- [see story] when NOBODY else was wearing them.  Even in Butte, we were oddities, and that's hard to accomplish in Butte."

Field Camp 1962

Students
In 1962 the Geological Sciences Curriculum included Departments of Geology, Geophysics-Geochemistry, and Mineralogy.  GSc 470, Introduction to Field Geology, was taught in the 9th Term, and Field Geology (GSc 472) was taught as a summer course in the West.  It is unclear, from the University General Catalog, which majors were required to take GSc 472, but probably geophysicists were not.
Thanks to Lynn Brant and Al Bowser for the names for 1962.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Kenneth A (Al) Bowser  
Lynn A Brant (MS71, DEd80)  
Arthur F (Art) Fuller, Jr.  
Ron Smith (MS68)  
Ed Dowling  
James L Lovejoy  
Linda Williamson Groth (MS66)  
Peter K Groth (MS66)  
Malcolm Stewart  
Nan Stewart  

 

Faculty

Rob Scholten



TA
   Samuel B (Sam) Romberger
Samuel B (Sam) Romberger (PhD68)



Where They Stayed
   Little Sheep Creek Campground west of Lima, Montana (see the 1963 page)

Main Projects
   Mapping in the Tendoy Range

Click here to read Lynn Brant's recollections about the 1962 field camp

Sam Romberger remembers that "Norm Lavery [PhD68] was the camp cook; he opened a lot of cans.  Another thing, (actually there were others that I can't repeat) that I remember about Montana/Idaho is when Rob's wife got carded in the local bar."

 

 

Field Camp 1963
Some of the Field Camp members. L to r, "Merrily" Sturges, Robert Needem, Jerry (Merv) Bartholomew, Mitchell Smith, Bob Gardner, Rob Scholten, Larry Ramspott, Mrs. Ramspott, T.K. Reeves, Ron Bartrie, and Lynn Brant (T.A.). Thanks to David Reidenour for the photo and the identifications.

Field Camp 1963

Students
In 1963 the Geological Sciences Curriculum included Departments of Geology, Geophysics-Geochemistry, and Mineralogy.  GSc 470, Introduction to Field Geology, was taught during the academic terms, and Field Geology (GSc 472) was taught as a summer course in the West.  It is unclear, from the University General Catalog, which majors were required to take GSc 472, but probably geophysicists were not. Thanks to Jerry Bartholomew for the 1963 names.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Mervin Jerome (Jerry) Bartholomew  
Gerald S Barton  
Mary Sturges Clark  
Leonard R (Bob) Gardner (MS66, PhD68)  
Lloyd S Grearson, Jr.  
David E Nielsen  
Thomas K Reeves, Jr.  
David R Reidenouer (MS66)  
Mitchell Smith  
Richard M Zoll  
Donovan B (Don) Kelly  

 

Faculty

Rob ScholtenRob Scholten (left), Larry Ramspott (PhD62; faculty, University of Georgia), Larry Lattman (cross-country)



TA
   Lynn A Brant (MS71, DEd80)

Lima SceneWhere They Stayed
   Little Sheep Creek Campground west of Lima, Montana (Lima to left)

Main Projects
   Mapping in the Tendoy Range

Jerry Bartholomew's recollections about the 1963 field camp, with some additional comments by Lynn Brant and David Reidenourt 

 

Jerry BartholomewJerry Bartholomew's Recollections of the 1963 Field Camp (Jerry still teaches at the Penn/YBRA Field School), with additional comments by Lynn Brant

I went to field camp in 1963. Rob Scholten taught the camp that year with Larry Ramspott, who was then an Assistant Professor at the University of Georgia, as his assistant, and Lynn Brant, who had been at the camp the previous year, as TA.

     Different groups of 3-4 drove the vehicles out. Lynn Brant was in our vehicle. We stayed one night at "Wendt," SD at a ranch where they had stayed the previous year [see Lynn Brant's story on the 1962 webpage]. The ranch was quite large, but the owner could neither read nor write (except his name), and his spouse did not want any of those oil rigs on their property. Their living room had a walk-in stone fireplace, where you could place large logs, and then a sunken area in front of it, and a wide stairway that went to the second floor. We then drove west and over the Bighorns (and had our first snowball fight) before Bob Gardnerarriving at YBRA. I believe that it was the 4th of July when we were collecting feldspar crystals (which I still have) from a granite in the Beartooths when we got a blizzard that dropped about 7-8" of snow before we got back to YBRA.

     We collected near YBRA and then spent a couple of days touring the Beartooths, Yellowstone, and Hebgen Lake on our way to Lima, Montana. We spent most of our six weeks camped at the campground on Little Sheep Creek near Lima; we typically had Sundays to go into Lima. There were about 10 of us there, along with a couple of graduate students who were working in the area (the names of Donovan B Kelly and Robert W Hall from the 1962 camp list both look familiar). One of the grad students got sick and stayed in the Lima Hotel for a while. [See Lynn Brant's recollections below: that was actually Don Kelly, an undergrad.]  Another graduate student was a tall, thin guy [Herm Witte: read Bob Gardner's story] who put wheat germ on everything and constantly bragged about how much he could eat, until one day I came back hungry: he had 7 burgers without buns, so I had 8 burgers with buns and toppings!

     Each student pair had a block of the Tendoy Range to map using air photos. Our base maps only contained ridgelines and streams, so all mapping had to be done on the photos. We completed a map, cross section, and report, usually by the light of a gas lamp in the tent to stay warm enough to work in the evening. My map wasn't too bad. I started working in that area again in 1983 when I joined the Montana Bureau of Mines & Geology at Montana Tech and have continued to do work there.

     My partner was Mitch Smith (who was wounded in Vietnam; I later ran into him in the late 60's in southern California). Mitch and I were assigned a 28 square mile area west of Dell, Montana that was the northernmost of the five areas and included Timber Butte Mtn and Dixon Mtn to just south of Big Sheep Creek. Bob Gardner (who later joined the faculty at the University of South Carolina) partnered with Dave Reidenouer (who I believe later worked for the PA Survey) to map the the adjacent area to the south between Big Sheep Creek and Little Sheep Creek. T K Reeves and Mary had the next area to the south, which they could walk to from the camp on Little Sheep Creek. Another team was farther south in an area that included Garfield Mtn (the highest peak in the area) along the continental divide.

     One of the short day-projects that we had to do was to sketch the "wailing wall" along Big Sheep Creek (sec.15, T14S, R10W). My original sketch in 1963 was not very good, but I redid the sketch and analyzed the outcrop for the 1989 Tobacco Root Geological Society meeting in Dillon, so other field-camp people can see it again today in: Northwest Geology, volume 18, p.33. They may also recognize the outcrop with folds about 2 miles west of the Red Rock fault scarp on Big Sheep Creek (sec. 25, 36, T13S, R10W) on p.27, and the Red Rock fault scarp, which we trenched, near the road to camp on Little Sheep Creek (p.23).

     Rob's spouse [Marsha] cooked our meals for us, and I believe that his son was there as well. Rob took us to Dillon one evening for a steak dinner; we visited Bannock; some of our group participated in the cow-milking contest at the Rodeo in Dillon; we took a two day trip to see volcanics in Idaho; and at the end of the camp, we took a trip to Butte and Anaconda and Glacier National Park.  On the trip to visit volcanics in Idaho, we climbed up a steep slope of volcanic material and I remember that Rob was surprised that I climbed it faster than he did, but not by much. (Of course nowadays at YBRA there are an increasing number of students who can climb the hill faster than I can!) We came down the far side and collected beautiful petrified wood (with tree rings and worm-holes or ant-holes well preserved) so everyone picked as many pieces as they could carry in their arms. It was several miles back to the vehicles, however, so the trail was marked by pieces of petrified wood. I still have the 3 pieces I brought back along with an unusual gizzard-stone(?).

     The small groups drove the vehicles back to PA after Glacier, while Rob went back to the camp on Little Sheep Creek (a bear had raided it once we had left!). Our van (Mitch, Bob, Dave, and I) drove north from Glacier National Park into Canada, detouring far enough west to "set foot" in British Columbia and to see some spectacular folds before heading back east to Medicine Hat and then straight across southern Canada to Winnipeg, then south into the USA and across the northern peninsula of Michigan, then south to the Turnpike and back to PA. [DHE: This short side trip gained some notoriety in later years and has now reached legendary status.]

     I know that Rob taught the 1962 camp in the same area, and I believe that he also taught the 1964 and 1961 camps there as well.

     Of all the faculty members at PSU, Rob and his field camp had the greatest impact on me. Dick Jahns and Lauren Wright were also quite important to me. That 6-weeks camp in one area really gives people the time to learn how to map, and those principles can then be applied to any area and any rocks. Having since mapped some 40-50 7.5-minute quadrangles in many different types of rocks, I know that initial long period of time in one area was more important than a variety of short projects in different rock types. Of course most camps today don't operate that way, including YBRA.

Some additional comments by Lynn Brant on the 1963 field camp

Lynn BrantI was at the Penn State summer camp among the Lima Peaks in 1962 as a student and 1963 as a student instructor.  I also popped in several times in 1964 when Oscar Huh and I were working on limestones in Idaho. 

Yes, I read Jerry's piece.  He tells it pretty well.  There were a couple points I remember slightly differently.  The guy who got sick and spent a night or two in Idaho Falls was Don Kelly who was in my class but who worked in Greenland the summer of 62 and took summer camp in 63.  I was with him in Idaho Falls that weekend he was sick, and we watched a partial eclipse of the sun from the hotel window.

Lynn's comments about the previous year's field camp
 

Lynn Brant remembers about the 1962 field camp.... most of this narrative is from an article in the Fall 2005 Earth News from the Department of Earth Science, University of Northern Iowa

 

Geology field camp, as any old geologist will tell you, can be quite adventurous, sometimes even educational.  My experience in 1962 was like that.

     After a spring field course of mapping and measuring sections in a Pennsylvania quarry, five of us piled into a brand new International Travelall, the mother of all SUVs, and headed to Montana to see the real thing.  The five of us made it, but the Travelall didn't.  It was a nice, straight portion of a South Dakota highway.  I totaled the vehicle and sent Nan to the hospital in Pierre.  A few days later, we retrieved Nan and resumed our travels in other vehicles of the Penn State caravan.  Nan carried a 40-pound backpack that summer with her recovering collar bone which was broken in the accident.  Tough woman!

     Nan's roommate during her two days in the hospital was Florence Williams, the wife of a rancher, who, I think, had fallen off a ladder. When we came home we stopped at their ranch and had a nice visit. Their place was near a former town site called Wendt. Dick Williams was kind of a show-off. He pretended to be a big drinker, fast in his cars, and all the rest you would associate with a cowboy. Actually, it wasn't a show -- he really was that sort of guy!!  But he was likeable.  We stopped there in 1963 (maybe twice) because I got to know the Williams pretty well over the years.

     We entered southwest Montana and then crossed Centennial Valley on the gravel road that nearly mired several of the vehicles. But, oh, what scenery!  That was as close to heaven as I had ever been.  The green valley and snowcapped mountains set in the "big sky" of Montana!

     Penn State's camp was a small Forest Service campground at the end of a long, lonely road.  Lima was ten miles away and the Lima Peaks rose around us.  Accommodations were two persons to a tent, and the dining hall was a tarp strung over a picnic table.  The nearest telephone, refrigerator, and running water were in Lima.  The nearest grocery store and fresh meat were in Dillon, some 40 or 50 miles away.  The camp managers bought food once a week in Dillon, and on that one night each week we had fresh meat, some fresh fruit, maybe some wine, and delicious strawberry pie from Skeet's Cafe.  The rest of the week was kind of thin.  It was that summer that I learned that two eggs for breakfast was a real luxury.  We had a chance to get a shower at the Lima Hotel on Saturday, whether we needed it or not.  By Friday or Saturday my socks stood up by themselves!  The evening entertainment was singing ribald songs around the campfire and, of course, working on our maps.

     Undergrads in camp that summer were Ron Smith (who later got his MS with Al Guber), Ed Dowling, Jim Lovejoy, Art Fuller, Al Bowser, Lynn Brant, Linda Williamson, Peter Groth, Nan Stewart, and Malcolm Stewart. Graduate students, some getting introduced to their thesis work: John Haas [PhD66], Sam Romberger [PhD68], Ivo Lucchitta [PhD67], Baerbel Koesters [PhD66], who later married Ivo and had a career with USGS/NASA, John M'Gonigal [PhD65] and his wife, and Skip Lenker [Earle S Lenker, PhD62], who had his T-bird along. There was a highschool-aged helper, Ron Bortree, Rob and Marsha Scholten, and Peter Scholten (only ten years old that summer but he was as fast up the mountains as his dad!). I think maybe Marsha was the main cook that summer. Then Lauren Wright and Ben Troxel visited for a while and went out with the students to help teach.

     Before going west in 62, one of the veterans from 1961 advised me to always be first up a mountain (to demonstrate enthusiasm). I tried!  But Rob was fast and his wife and son were faster. There were several times I headed up the hill as fast as I could go, and even though I was the first of the students, I was met by the Scholten family on the top!  Once we were some distance from the vehicles when Rob finished his lecture and the whole group headed back. I decided to be first but Rob was ahead of me. Neither of us admitted to being in a race but that we were. He beat me but I gave him a good run!!

     We worked in teams of two, and each team was responsible for mapping a designated area.  Al was my partner, and we mapped a 28-square-mile expanse of mostly Mesozoic sedimentary rocks on the south side of the Lima Peaks.  To reach the area each day we drove a 1948 Jeep (just like the ones used on MASH, except ours was a faded maroon color) to Lima, down the paved road at 40 mph (because that was its top speed) and then several miles across ranch land to where we started our walk of up to seven miles to reach the far corner of our area.  We mapped on air photos.  There were no topographic maps for that part of Montana in 1962.

     One day Al and I tried approaching our area by crossing the mountain.  We got the Jeep up to a grassy meadow near a sheepherder's wagon.  Then we started across the talus toward a saddle on a ridge.  I thought I heard water running, but because we were on boulders on the side of a steep mountain, I couldn't figure out where the water was coming from.  Then I noticed that I heard it only when I took a step.  Holy Smokes!!!  The whole side of the mountain was slowly moving down slope with every step!  Surrounded by big boulders and with a cliff below us, I realized that if we started a rock slide they wouldn't even know where to look for our remains!  We quickly got off the slope and returned to the Jeep, shaken but alive.  No geology done that day!

     When the course ended, the five of us who had been in the ill-fated Travelall started home together.  My companions were Pete, Linda, Nan and Malcolm, plus a ground squirrel in a cage.  Malcolm and I had decided to grow a beard that summer, at a time when nobody grew beards.  Pete was clean-shaven: to impress Linda, I suspect.  Malcolm was married to Nan, so he wasn't trying to impress anyone.  We left Lima in a Plymouth station wagon that had been seriously abused that summer by one of the grad students (always blame the grad students).  We made it to Butte by nightfall, where we tried to turn around in a school and found we had no working transmission.  (I swear, I wasn't driving that time!!)  We were stuck on the edge of a town that had a reputation for being rough.  Besides, the copper miners in Butte had gone on strike that very day.  But we were tough.  We had just spent a summer in the mountains of Montana and we had our sleeping bags.  No problem.  The police didn't see it that way in the middle of the night, though.  We had to explain why we were sleeping in the school yard and why we were driving a vehicle registered to The Pennsylvania State University.  Our beards and the caged squirrel didn't help matters.  Neither did the fact that Pete was in his underwear as he locked up the car again.  "You get some pants on before daylight.  You're in a residential area young man!" said the cop.

     It took two days to fix the transmission, but in the era of sending checks through the mail we waited for six days before the garage would let us go.  Meanwhile we checked into an old hotel in downtown Butte for only $5.00 a night for all five of us, six counting the squirrel.  For that we got a parlor, a bedroom, and a bathroom with a tub, as long as we promised not to sleep in the bed.  So we rolled out our sleeping bags, placed the squirrel on the fireplace mantle and went to sleep.  Money was short.  We made a rule that if you couldn't eat it or read it you didn't buy it!  We ate for five nights in a row in the three Chinese restaurants in town because Nan thought we could get the most food for our buck that way.

     After Butte we traveled to Glacier National Park and home to Pennsylvania through Billings, Montana, and Iowa.  Coming down the long hill into Billings from the rimrocks we heard on the radio "Ramblin Rose" by Nat King Cole for the first time.  Every time I hear that song I think of that sunny, hot day in August so many years ago.

     There were other adventures that summer, like the time the sheriff and I went up that lonely road with a loaded 30-30, which we figured we might have to use (and not on a bear!).  But as everyone knows, there are some stories from field camp best left untold.  Within a few years Pete and Linda got married, Nan and Malcolm got divorced, and Al married my sister.  And I lived happily ever after.

 

 

An essay by Don Kelly on the Wild Cow Milking Contest, with comments by Ed Beutner, Rob Scholten, and Jerry Bartholomew

My First Wild Cow, a story from the 1963 Penn State Field Camp. Illustration by Martin Jarrie.
A  version of Don Kelly's story, My First Wild Cow, appeared in the March/April 2008 issue of The Penn Stater alumni magazine (p. 13), accompanied by this illustration by Martin Jarrie

Ed Beutner, Rob Scholten, and Don Kelly on the Wild Cow Milking Contest

Ed BeutnerED BEUTNER: "I was working in Idaho, but I remember driving over to Lima to meet to spend the 4th of July with the field camp group and the other grad students (Baerbel Luchitta, Oscar Huh, Bob Ryder) who had gathered.  To uphold the honor of Penn State, several of the group (fortunately not including me) entered the wild cow milking contest at the local rodeo, an event which required consumption of a lot of beer by all of us beforehand.  This event involved a team of three being given a rope at the other end of which was a range cow. The goal was to get a perceptible amount of milk from the cow into a Coke bottle. The cow, on her part, tried to drag the trio face down across the arena through the dirt and cow poop"


Rob ScholtenA LETTER TO THE EDITOR OF THE SUMMER COLLEGIAN, July 18, 1963, entitled "Geologists Defend University's Honor":

     "Who says students are getting soft?  Not those at the Penn State Geology Camp in Montana!

     This is to inform you that, at the Lima, Montana, rodeo the PSU Wild Cow Milking Team, consisting of Lynn Brant, Don Kelly and Mitch Smith, wrestled the maddest, snortingest, stampingest, bellowing range cow these parts have seen in many a year, held her fast by head and tail, and milked her to deafening applause in the stands in 52 seconds flat!

     True, they didn't win, but they did beat several teams of life-long husky cowpokes.  I figure the folks back East would want to know that Penn State's honor is being properly defended in the woolly West!

        ------ Robert Scholten, Associate Professor of Geology"


My First Wild Cow for Dear Old State
Or, Take one wild cow, add pop bottle and spit

by Donovan Kelly

Donovan KellyI hadn't thought about that wild cow, the one I attacked with a pop bottle, in a long time. I mean, who thinks much about the summer of 1963 these days? Shoot, I have trouble remembering last summer.

But there I was, in the middle of a vanity search, looking to see where Google might find my name on the web, when my summer of 63 popped up.  Who would have thought that Penn State had a web page just for the summer geology field camp program? Or that my 1963 field camp in Montana would have its own page and include a fleeting reference to me and my first wild cow?

It was not love at first sight.  It was war. The honor of all easterners was at stake. We saw how the good old boys of Montana looked at us. We saw them in their tall boots, jeans and long-sleeve shirts laughing at our shorts and tee shirts.

Maybe they thought we were after their women, but all we wanted was their geology. Just enough to fill our map, write a report and pass a class that had kept us on the road for 6 weeks.  This was my last class before graduation and I already had a real job waiting for me.  Geophysical Services Inc. had promised me a return to the Arctic and an assignment on the North Slope of Alaska. (What I got was West Texas, Louisiana, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait.)

Before we could map Montana geology and drink local beer, we had to first win acceptance from the locals. Our leader, Dr. Scholten, said winning over the locals was an important lesson for all geologists to learn. You can look it up in my notes. Little did I know that I would spend 30 years at USGS doing just that, working with the news media to try and make the world safer for geologists.

Donovan KellyI think it was Dr. Scholten himself who suggested that we enter the local Lima rodeo to earn goodwill and show them we were just regular people. Or maybe it was the devil himself who suggested it, thinking he would get a good laugh.  Both got their laughs, and both were smart enough not to enter themselves. 

For a number of reasons, we passed up bull riding. In fact, the only event we were remotely qualified for was the wild cow milking contest. As fate would have it, I was the only student present who had actually milked anything before. Most of my milking experience had been with goats, but one summer I did dabble in cows. But what we faced was not those gentle Pennsylvania milking cows strapped in a barn and munching hay.  These were free-roaming cows fresh off the range that had never had any friendly human contact. Mama cows who were extra frantic because they were looking for their lost calves and whose udders were painfully swollen.

Did I mention that these 800-pound cows were running loose in an arena and being hooted on by the locals? My teammates, Lynn Brant and Mitch Smith, were to hold the cow still enough and long enough, for me to get some milk into a tight-lipped Coke bottle. "Got to see some color," the judges explained.

Our cow never got what I would call still, but I did manage to squirt some milk into the bottle and went racing back to the judges. I think we came in second. The judge looked at my cow-trodden and plop-plastered feet and proud grin and then at the bottle. "Looks like real milk," he said. "Most people know enough to just spit in the bottle."

Maybe it was a put down, but at least we were able to drink beer with the locals after that. And next time, I'll just spit in the bottle.

(P. S. Yes, I'm the one who got sick and spent a week in the Lima railroad hotel with Goldie who made me oatmeal and sent daily updates to my mother. Sorry, Lynn, I don't remember the partial eclipse. Just an excess of train whistles and oatmeal. After recovering, I stayed over at field camp after the other undergraduates left to finish my geology report. I ended up hitchhiking back to Pennsylvania. Rest of the story will cost you a beer. Send it to donovan@donovanwrites.com).  [Don's website <http://donovanwrites.com/> includes excerpts from his book "Quest for the Holy Grill: 50 Crummy But Good Restaurants Within Rambling Range of Washington, D.C."  The picture accompanying this piece, showing the correct way to eat corn, was originally published with a story in The Washington Post and appears on his website.]

Jerry BartholomewAnd an addendum from Jerry Bartholomew: Since I was not at the Rodeo, your "hands on" experience is important for people to appreciate the extent to which the field camp folks tried to blend in with the locals. In that same spirit, I don't know if you remember or not, but there was also a dance at the schoolhouse in Monida (south of Lima a few miles on I-15) that at least some of us went to.  That old school house was not in too bad of shape in 1983 when I moved to Butte, where I lived and worked for a decade, but it is now in ruins.
 

 

 

Leonard (Bob) Gardner's recollections of Herm and the Bug

Field Camp Alumni 1963 Gardner
Gypsum beds in Oklahoma.  To the right: Herm Witte and The Bug. Photo courtesy of David Reidenour

Bob Gardner recalls Herm and the Bug at the 1963 camp

     I read Jerry Bartholomew's recollections of the 1963 field camp. He refers to a tall skinny grad student with thick glasses who ate wheat germ. This was Herman Witte. He was from Trenton NJ and did a MS in Geology at Penn State. I believe that he then went to the University of Alabama to study psychiatry but have since lost track of him. Just before we started out on the cross-country geology tour, Herm's mother bought him a brand new Volkswagon Bug. A day or so later the carravan was camping somewhere in southern Ohio. The next morning Herm announced that he had to take his Bug in to have its 500 mile checkup. Larry Lattman, who was leading that leg of the tour, said "God damn it Herm, we can't wait for you to take your car in for service!" So off we went minus Herm. Several days later we were riding the dirt back roads of southwestern Missouri to meet a mining geologist who was going to show us the lead-zinc deposits of that area. Suddenly up ahead we saw a yellow Bug making circles in the road. It was Herm!  " How the hell did you ever find us out here?" Well it turned out that Herm had stopped at a restaurant on US 66 in Joplin the night before and by pure chance had met the geologist who we were going to meet the next day.
  
     Herm pulled off another similar stroke of good luck several days later in Carlsbad NM. We were staying in a KOA campground and on Sunday morning had gone out to see the Caverns. We came back around noon to have lunch and a short siesta. At about 2PM the caravan set off to tour a potash mine just west of Carlsbad. At the mine we boarded an elevator and went down about a thousand feet to the potash workings.  From there we walked about a mile along one of the drifts and then noticed that Herm and Dave Reidenour were not with us. Later, as our host was discussing the geochemical origin of the deposits and the mining methods used to extract them, we heard voices coming down the drift. And then into our midst came Herm and Dave, unescorted. They had overslept and missed the caravan. So they set out into the dessert in the Bug looking for us in one of a dozen or so mines in the area. As luck would have it they stumbled upon the right mine, and the elevator operator sent them down with instructions as to which drift to follow.
  
     Unfortunately Herm's luck ran out later in Montana. One morning, while driving to his map area, he hit a boulder that had rolled onto the road and had to be towed into Lima for repairs.

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images: (The first five images are from 1963, thanks to David Reidnour, in addition to the lead photo on the 1963 recollections page and the lead photo on the Herm and Bug page. The other photos were taken in the 1980s and a few in 2009 by Jerry Bartholomew.)

 

 

Alumni Field Camp 1963 Photos
       
Looking south from Little Water alond Dixon Mtn. The show-capped Lima Peaks appear south of Little Sheep Creek.
A view looking southeast from the top of Dixon Mtn. The Red Rock fault cuts a Pleistocene fan in Red Rock River Valley (lower left).  Town of Lima at top left, Lima Peaks at top right, Big Sheep Creek in lower right.
Looking south from Dixon Mtn toward Mt. Garfield (center distance) and the Lima Peaks (left distance).  White Pine Ridge is on the right horizon and Deadwood Gulch in the lower right.
Looking south, from near the Little Sheep Campground, at Mt. Garfield (right) and the Lima Peaks (left).
View looking south at Mt. Garfield from Little Sheep Creek, at the turnoff to the access road to the campground.
View looking north down the access road from the campsite toward Little Sheep Creek.
View of the Lima Peaks (left) and Mt. Garfield (right) south of Little Sheep Creek
View looking east at the town of Lima. The road to Little Sheep Creek is in the lower right.
Moose at Dell with Dixon Mtn in the background
Looking north at Dixon Mtn from White Pine Ridge
Scarp at the Red Rock fault, along Big Sheep Creek
Looking west at the scarp of the Red Rock fault, at Little Sheep Creek. The scarp was trenched in 1986, to the right of the road.
The Sheep Creek segment of the Red Rock fault at Big Sheep Creek. There are two offset Pleistocene alluvial fans.
The old school house in Dell, closed in 1963, has had an interesting history as a restaurant and local history place.
A shot of the old "downtown Lima" area along the railroad tracks. 2009.
The bar at the Peat Hotel in downtown Lima now (2009) offers steaks (you grill them) and salad for about $10-12 dollars to go with your beer.
The 63 camp went to a dance with the local folks at this Humphrey school a few miles south along I-15 in Idaho.  Sadly, it has progressively declined over the past decade (prior to 2009).
View looking west up Big Sheep Creek from the top of White Pine Ridge, looking toward Medicine Lodge Valley.
Shatter cones in Belt Series rocks in Medicine Lodge Valley. Proceed west from the campsite along Big Sheep Creek and then north.
Look west at the ghost town of Bannock. It is an old arsenic district and a modern placer gold district.
The ghost town of Bannock
The ghost town of Bannock
Tent of Bob Gardner and David Ridenour, Little Sheep Creek Campground
The Anaconda stack
Barracks at the old chromite mine, Stillwater. Cross-country trip out, camp in Sangre de Cristo Mtns, New Mexico The Berkeley pit at Butte Red sandstone cliffs in northern New Mexico, and a PSU vehicle
David Reidenour in the field, Tendoy Mtns
Tendoy Mtns from the tent of Bob Gardner and David Reidenour, 1963

 

 

Penn Staters about to enter wild cow milking contest, Lima, Montana, 1962
Lynn Brant (to the right, in a grey/white checkered shirt) briefs the Penn State field camp teams about a wild cow milking contest, in Lima, Montana.  He was an expert because he'd done it the summer before.  Thanks for the picture to Lynn, who writes "Jack Crelling is nearest the camera on the first seat with the big white hat and plaid shirt.  Oscar Huh is leaning behind him in the white T-shirt.  Lynn is in the blue plaid shirt with the crumpled hat.  Nearest the camera is Perry Rahn (?). Two over, the guy examining his camera is John M'Gonigle.  John's wife, Georgia (?) is the woman with sunglasses.  The child at her feet may be a little M'Gonigle. Behind Georgia is probably Peter Scholten, Rob's son.  There are three guys between Peter and the guy with a black hat who I think are Penn State students.  The one next to the black hat might be Ted Gard.  Then in front of them are Al Guber and Shamsul Siddiqui.  My!  How much younger we all looked some forty years ago!" Bob Williams (2014) adds that he is standing next to Lynn in the grey shirt and white hat, with his left hand stuck in his back pants pocket; Robert Stiner is in the "red sweathsirt and black cowboy hat. He wore the red shirt often...like every day. Most students in the photo are wearing white cowboy hats, but Bob Stiner wanted to look mean and tough, so he chose black. "

Field Camp 1964

Students
In 1964 the Departments in the Geological Sciences Major were changed again, into a Department of Geology-Geophysics and a Department of Geochemistry-Mineralogy.  Courses took on Gchem, Geology, Geophysics, and GSc names.  The field courses became Geol 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic terms and summer Geol 472, Field Geology.  It is unclear, from the University General Catalog, which majors were required to take Geol 472.  Most of these names are from the database of 1965 Geology or Geological Sciences alumni that, hopefully, is a proxy for 1964 field camp
, although some may have attended a year earlier or a year later, and some may not have been required to take it.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Charles Ronald Bair  
Robert Lewis Brown  
Kenneth F Coleman, Jr.  
John Foster Houser  
Duane L Sprague  
Robert Doyle Stiner  
Robert B (Bob) Williams  

 

 


Faculty 


Rob Scholten



Where They Stayed
  
Little Sheep Creek Campground west of Lima, Montana

Main Projects
   Mapping in the Tendoy Range

Lynn Brant emails that in addition to the Wild Cow Milking Contest at the 1963 Field Camp, there were TWO teams at the 1964 camp.  He, "Black Jack" Crelling, and Oscar Huh made up one of those teams.  Lynn (MS71, DEd80), Oscar (MS63, PhD68), Ted Gard (PhD69), and John M'Gonigal (PhD65) were graduate students working in the area.  Lynn adds that the cow was much stronger than the one the rodeo had given Penn State the year before. "And I wonder if that was on purpose!  We didn't take any prizes that year [as in 1963]."

Bob Williams sent an extended letter in February, 2014, that clears up the the second Wild Cow team. .

Comments on the 1964 Penn State Geosciences Field Camp

Bob Williams sent a letter in February, 2014. He lives now in Pisgah Forest, North Carolina:
Bob Williams
Please add my name (Robert B. Williams) to the list of Penn State students who attended Field Camp in 1964.  What a blast!  Best summer of my life. Learned so much. It was great to finally take classroom knowledge and apply it.

I was teamed for mapping with Robert Doyle Stiner. John Foster Houser was teamed with Shamsul Siddiqui, originally from Pakistan.  The second team that entered the Wild Cow Milking Contest in 1964 (see Lynn Brant's comments) consisted of Robert Stiner and John Houser who tried (unsuccessfully) to hold the cow steady and me (Bob Williams) who held the esteemed position of "milker."  None of us was smart enough to think about spitting in the bottle to at least attempt to fool the judges. I was very near the tail end of the wild cow. You know, near the two high kicking hoofs. Frankly I was less worried about milking than I was trying to come out of the contest with my head still attached to my body.

In the Field Camp 1964 photo, I am standing on the extreme right, gray plaid shirt, white cowboy hat, with my left hand stuck in my back pants pocket. Although you cannot see his face, Robert Stiner is standing next to me wearing a red sweatshirt and black cowboy hat. He wore the red shirt often ... like every day. Most students in the photo are wearing white cowboy hats, but Bob Stiner wanted to look mean and tough so he chose black. The photo was taken when we were discussing strategy (who was going to do what) with Lynn Brant for the Wild Cow Milking Contest.

Memories include the snowball battle we had on the pass between Idaho & Montana in early July; the extremely slow pace of the "locals" in the Lima area; eating meals on picnic tables; living in tents at the campground by Little Sheep Creek west of Lima, Montana; cold nights; mapping at night by the light of Coleman lanterns; washing in the nearby (very cold) Little Sheep Creek; showering once a week at the Peat Hotel in Lima; driving all the way to Dillon on Sundays for food & supplies; one very interesting side trip to the Grand Canyon; sleeping under the stars in sleeping at the base of Devil's Tower, South Dakota; the nice light blue GMC Chevrolet Carryall; and the big green International Carryall which John Houser drove and we nicknamed "baluchitherium" ... an Oligocene rhinoceros with a small head mounted on a gigantic body. Whenever one of the vehicles became stuck, "baluchitherium" with its front bumper-mounted winch always came to the rescue.

After leaving Montana, Dr. Albert Guber and I returned by way of Rockford, Iowa to collect upper Devonian fossils in the famous clay pit of the Rockford Brick & Tile Company. As a result I spent course time the following fall identifying the material we had collected. This lead to my returning the next summer and extensively collecting in the area of Rockford and Bird Hill and subsequently using the material for the subject of my Master's thesis.

I really admired the sheepherders who would simply fold up their tents and move to the other side of the mountain when their sheep became spooked and ran off to other pastures. After returning home from field camp, I remember telling my parents that I was going to become a sheepherder. Mother was mortified. Father simply said "fine," but then went on to STRONGLY indicate that I was going to graduate with a degree in geological sciences from Penn State first! He was cool with my being a sheepherder if that is what I wanted, but I was going to be "the only sheepherder in Montana with a Penn State diploma handing on the inside of my tent."

While away at Field Camp, I wrote to my parents at least once a week and mother saved all the letters and post cards. They are squirreled away somewhere in my office. When I locate them, I will add more detailed information to this discussion of PSU Field Camp 1964.

Thanks for preserving the memories!

Kind regards,
Bob Williams

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images: (thanks to Lynn Brant for the pictures)

 

Alumni Field Camp 1964 Photos
     
Lynn Brant goes down as the team tries to corral the cow. He ended up on the ground looking up at the belly of the beast.
The three team members close in for the drop of milk in the bottle.
The team has just milked a wild cow: Oscar Huh, Lynn Brant, and John "Black Jack" Crelling.

 



 

 Penn State Geosciences 1965 Field Camp Alumni

Group photo at Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone.  Standing, l to r: Perry Rahn, Barry Voight, Paul Diehl, Ali Al-Rubaiyi, Evan Schuster, Joe Gerencher (hat), Fred Swanson (behind), Jay Byerly, John Bauer. Sitting l to r: Joe Watson, David Schieck, Tuck Moorshead, Bill Stuart, Sadik Bakar Jawad. Thanks to Russ & Linda Dutcher for the image.

Field Camp 1965

Students
In 1965 the Geological Sciences Major included Departments of Geology-Geophysics and Geochemistry-Mineralogy.  The field courses were Geol 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic terms and summer Geol 472, Field Geology.  It is unclear, from the University General Catalog, which majors were required to take Geol 472.  Students listed are those in the group photo above.
     Joe Gerencher, from his field notebook, recounts that the field school was preceded by a three-week cross-country trip, Geology 462, that left State College on June 13. It went south to Texas and ended up in Clarks Fork, Wyoming,on July 3, having made 61 geological stops.  On July 4 the group was in Red Lodge.  Larry Lattman was along on the first part of that trip.  The first set of pictures in the photogallery is from the cross-country trip.  Some students appear in these photos who are not in the Yellowstone group picture.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Ali Al-Rubaiya [Kuwait]  
John W Bauer (MS69)  
Jay Richard Byerly  
Paul E Diehl  
Joseph J Gerencher, Jr. (MS68)  
Sadik Bakar Jawad [Kuwait]  
Frank A (Tuck) Moorshead, III  
David E Schieck  
William D Stuart  
Evan T Shuster (MS70)  
Fred Swanson  
Joseph T (Joe) Watson  

 

 

Faculty
  
Larry Lattman (cross-country), Russ Dutcher, Barry Voight

TA
   Perry H Rahn (PhD65)

Where They Stayed
   YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana (This was the first class to use YBRA, a move initiated by Russ Dutcher.  Russ continued to use YBRA after he moved to Southern Illinois University, and has been involved in management of the physical plant since 1966.)  The course lasted five weeks, from July 5 to August 7.

Barry remembers...  "Joe Watson took up a [student-initiated] challenge to submerge in Red Lodge Creek (34o), for a prize, just before driving up the hill to camp.  He got into the creek and got wet.  So he wanted his prize, but I pointed out that I had said, "submerged," whereas all he had done was to get his back and legs and bottom wet, but his belly was dry; I said, you have to go all the way under, all at once.  Then it became hilarious because the creek was fast with shallow riffles, and try as he might, he couldn't squeeze all of himself under water all at once.  After watching him approaching hypothermia in dogged persistence for several minutes, I finally called him out, saying, OK, you earned it [six cold ones].
     Perry and I would go fishing now and then for golden trout in Hellroaring Plateau Creek and dump our catch into the freezer, until we had enough for the whole camp, at least the PSU bunch."

This is, to our knowledge, the only cross-country trip in which Larry Lattman participated.

Larry Lattman

Larry Lattman

Dr. Larry Lattman received his Bachelor of Chemical Engineering degree from City College of New York in 1948 and his masters and doctorate in Geology at the University of Cincinnati in 1951 and 1953. He began his professional career as an instructor in geology at the University of Cincinnati in 1952.  He spent the next year at the University of Michigan.  From 1953 to 1957, Dr. Lattman was a photo geologist for the Gulf Oil Corporation in Pittsburgh and New York. At Penn State from 1957 to 1970, he moved through the ranks of assistant, associate, and full professor of Geology. In 1970, Dr. Lattman returned to the University of Cincinnati as head of the Geology department. From 1975 to 1983, he served as Dean of two separate colleges at the University of Utah: the College of Mines and Minerals and the College of Engineering. In 1983, Dr. Lattman became President of New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, where he remained until his retirement in 1995. He has published 45 technical reports and articles and co-wrote two books, Aerial Photographs in the Field of Geology and Energy Law.

Larry was involved in the Penn State Field Camp only once, as far as we can tell, in 1965.  But he was a legendary figure at Penn State, in part for his science: he and Dick Parizek pioneered the technique of locating muncipal well fields at intersections of major fracture zones.  He would find such fractures from aerial photos and from his own plane (photo to right).Larry Lattman Plane 

Larry also taught physical geology (Geosc 20, or "Rocks for Jocks") to > 37,000 students at Penn State during a period of about 12 years in the 1960s and early 1970s. The popularity of physical geology was in part due to Lattman’s brilliant classroom style and in part due to a university requirement that all students take a science class.  It is estimated that one-quarter of all Penn State students during that time took Geosc 20 during their college careers.

     Joe Head (1969 field camp) sent along the photos below.  He writes "Here are a couple old photos from my senior year. I believe these were taken by fellow geology major Ken Walters, who was the inspiration for the practical joke. Dr. Laurence 'Larry' Lattman was the most popular lecturer at Penn State when I was an undergraduate. He was popular because of the nonscience major/no laboratory geosciences course that he taught. The last quarter he taught at Penn State he had 1,700 students in his class. They had to break it up into two sections, and had to give him Schwab Auditorium as a lecture location. He always introduced each course with a statement that there were three no's for the course: no textbook, no reading of the Daily Collegian in class, and no one from the state of New Jersey sitting in the first three rows. He would tell the class that he belonged to "The New Jersey Haters Society" and that their motto was: "And the sea retreated in disgust," referring to that time in geologic history when the swamps of New Jersey were created by the change in sea level.

     The day of Dr. Lattman's very last lecture in that course, he began to speak, only to be interrupted by the sound of a winch lowering one of the backdrop rods to display a banner which read, "Did the sea retreat in disgust?" He stopped briefly, then went back to lecturing without really commenting on the banner. Then we heard the winch again bringing down a second banner which read, "No, the land rose in triumph." During my years at Penn State, the Geology Department was noted for creative, nondestructive practical jokes. I think Ken Walter's joke on Dr. Lattman had to have topped them all."

Larry Lattman's last lecture in Geosc 20

The first banner descends during Larry Lattman's final lecture in Geosc 20, 1970

 

Larry Lattman's last lecture in Geosc 20

The second banner descends during Larry Lattman's final lecture in Geosc 20, 1970

Click on the thumbs to open: (thanks to Joe Gerencher and to Russ & Linda Dutcher for the photos)

 

 

Alumni Field Camp 1965 Photos
       
Larry expounding on the XC trip
Larry Lattman talking on the XC trip
Larry Lattman lecturing
Sadik, Fred, and Peg  XC trip
Skip, Paul, Eva Tucker, and Larry. Eva was a then-new assistant prof at Penn State Behrend.  on the XC trip
Breaking camp in the early morning in Texas  XC trip
Breaking camp in the early morning  XC trip
Breaking camp, early morning, perhaps in Oklahoma  XC trip
Closeup of the previous photo. Russ Dutcher has his foot on the bench, wife Pat seated. Kids are Rick & Jan Dutcher. Jack Crelling at far right.  XC trip
Group somewhere in New Mexico  XC trip
Closeup of the group photo, XC trip  L to r: ??, John Bauer, Sadik Bakar Jawad, ??, Evan Schuster, Joe Watson (kneeling), Paul Diehl, Bill Stuart, David Schieck, ??, ??, Peg, Jay Byerly, Ali Al-Rubaiyi, Joe Gerencher, Perry Rahn, ??
US Borax Company mine at 1300 ft level in Carlsbad, NM. It was a sylvite mine.  XC trip
Jack Crelling at a stream-incised alluvial floodplain  XC trip
somewhere on the cross-country trip
Fred Swanson near a vertical dike at Spanish Forks, Colorado  XC trip
Jack Crelling explaining coking of coal xenoliths in a magmatic sill, Spanish Peaks area, Colorado. It was raining heavily at the time.  XC trip
Joe Gerencher at Rocky Mtn Natl Park, Colorado  XC trip
Group viewing mountains, location uncertain  XC trip
same photo as the top of the page but with Perry Rahn and Russ Dutcher at upper left  Credit: Joseph J Gerencher, Jr.
same photo as the top of the page but with Russ and Barry at upper left  Credit: Barry Voight
Slide area at Mammoth Hot Springs
Barry Voight in volcanics
Paul Diehl at Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone
Slumped highway at Quake Lake, near Hebgen Lake, Montana
Perry Rahn at the fault scarp (right side up) near Quake Lake
Sadik Bakar Jawad on the Beartooth Plateau during a mapping exercise
Group at a viewing platform
Clark's Fork Canyon furrow
Pete Foose leads a group at Clark's Fork Canyon
Tuck Moorshead in the Elk Basin mapping project, MT/WY
Russ Dutcher captures a rattlesnake with a board at Elk Basin
Russ Dutcher apparently trying to capture the rattlesnake
Looking for outcrop, apparently
Landslide at Shell Canyon
Joe Gerencher on the porch of the PSU men's dorm at YBRA
Cattle wandering through the east end of YBRA in early morning
Along the Mississippi River. The old yellow-orange van that appears in several of the photos was named "ferro-hippus" by the group.  XC trip Peg at an exposure of loess in a stream valley near the Mississippi River.  XC trip soil auger in action  Probably on the XC trip Larry Lattman explains at a roadcut  on the XC trip
unknown location (Absarokas?)
Devil's Tower, SD, on the return trip to Penn State. Jay Byerly is on the picnic table.

 

 

 

 

 

 

1966 Penn State Geosciences Field Camp in the Lamar River Valley

Examining the Lamar Valley volcanics in Yellowstone. Thanks to Russ & Linda Dutcher for the image.  A closeup of the people is below.

Field Camp 1966

Students
In 1966 the Geological Sciences Major was changed to include options in Geophysics, Geochemistry-Mineralogy-Petrology, and Geology.  Geology and G-M-P required Geol 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic terms and summer Geol 472, Field Geology.  Thanks to Charles Faust and Dave Owens for the 1966 names.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Richard S Barrett  
Charles R Faust (PhD76)  
Ronald J Wahala  
Michael T (Mike) Roberts (MS68, PhD74)  
David W Owens  
Frank J Iafrate  
Robert H (Bob) Leeper, Jr.  
David C Lindahl  

 

Faculty
   Russ Dutcher, Duff Gold

Where They Stayed
    YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana

Main Projects
  
Elk Basin, Beartooth front, Stillwater, Little Bear Creek, Rosebud, and a Yellowstone trip

In 1966, because of a small number of students, the Princeton-YBRA Field School was combined with the Penn State Field School into a single curriculum of instruction under Russ Dutcher.  Dave Owens remembers that "it was all one class -- we all piled into the same vans together, went on the same itinerary together, did the same exercises together.  The students were mostly Penn Staters, but several students from other universities were there too.  Rice sounds familiar.  I drove back East with a geology student from a small PA college--believe it was Bucknell."

In 1966 Russ Dutcher also began duties as YBRA Camp Manager, with the title formally bestowed in or just before 1972.  He has continued service at YBRA in many capacities until the present day.

Peter D Tillman writes: "I'm an alum of the YBRA field camp in (I'm pretty sure) 1966. I can recall students from Princeton, Penn State, Dartmouth, William & Mary, and one Rice guy (me) in the class.  I definitely recall Russ Dutcher teaching. We had a lot of fun, and learned a lot of geology. Very nice group, students & faculty both.
     I was the driver of MOOSE, one of the ancient Chevy carryalls we used. I recall the truck dying on a weekend -- it needed a distributor part, which we were able to scrounge from an abandoned Chevy pickup I'd noticed in a field on the outskirts of Red Lodge. Lubricated by 25c. glasses of Great Falls Select from the Senate Bar....
     Thanks for the website!  Cheers -- Pete Tillman, BS (Rice) 1968, MS (UNC-CH) 1976, Consulting Geologist, Arizona and New Mexico"

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images: Thanks to Bob Leeper and Dave Owens for identifying people.

 

Alumni Field Camp 1966 Photos
 
Closeup of the people in the picture at the top of the page, Lamar Valley, Yellowstone  Dave Owens 2nd from left, 4th from left (partially hidden) probably David Lindahl, Bob Leeper 6th from left, Mike Roberts 7th from left

 

 
 

Heart Mountain, Sunlight Basin, Wyoming
Heart Mountain, Sunlight Basin, Wyoming Credit: Phil Norbeck

Field Camp 1967

Students
In 1967 the Geological Sciences Major included options in Geophysics, Geochemistry-Mineralogy-Petrology, and Geology.  Geology and G-M-P required Geol 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic terms and summer Geol 472, Field Geology.  Thanks to Terry Engelder for the names for 1967.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Richard Bloss  
Bruce Arthur Benton  
Janet Ebert  
J Terry Engelder  
Stephen Anthony (Steve) Krajewski, Jr. (MS72)  
Alan Marc Zuckerman  

 

Faculty
   Dick Parizek (cross-country trip), Duff Gold, Russ Dutcher, Barry Voight & Rob Scholten (Yellowstone trip)

TA
   Mel Podwysocki (MS68, PhD74)

Where They Stayed
  YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana

From the YBRA Annual Meeting Minutes of July 2, 1967, courtesy of Russ & Linda Dutcher: "Dutcher reported that the five week Penn State Field Course consists of 15 students, including 2 women.  R. Dutcher and Barry Voight from Penn State are faculty for this course."

Main Projects
   Line Creek, Elk Basin, Clark's Fork, Rattlesnake Mountain, Beartooth front

Terry Engelder remembers that they also took a "trip through Yellowstone and into southwest Idaho (led by) Barry Voight and Rob Scholten.  I have been fly fishing once in my life and that was with Barry Voight's rod on the Madison River during the trip through Yellowstone and into southwest Idaho."

Duff remembers that on an excursion to the New World Mining District in the Cooke City area, there was an avalanche.  All roads out were blocked.

Barry Voight remembers that "I took the 1967 class to the Yellowstone/Tetons/Hebgen earthquake areas. Also took them to visit Scholten in the field in SW Montana, where RS almost got in a fist fight with a contractor named McCrosson (I think) who threw his clothes on the wet floor at the local swimming pool. I remember we had a water polo game there."
 

 Students mapping in the Beartooths, 1968 Penn State Geosciences Field Camp

Bob Brown (M.S. 1971) and Bernie Foerster (M.S. 1970) mapping at Little Bear Creek, Beartooth Range, Montana.  Bob and Bernie were graduate students at the field school.  Thanks to Russ & Linda Dutcher for the image.

Field Camp 1968

Students
In 1968 the Geological Sciences Major included options in Geophysics, Geochemistry-Mineralogy-Petrology, and Geology.  Geology and G-M-P required Geol 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic terms and summer Geol 472, Field Geology.  Thanks to Karen Wenrich for the names for 1968.  Karen adds that a male and a female student from Rice University were brought in to increase the number of participants.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Robert L (Bob) Brown (M.S. 1971)  
Bernard Foerster (M.S. 1970)  
Rit Gruber (grad student)  
John H Grimes  
Boies Hall  
Wade M Harmon  
Richard A (Rich) Olsen  
James K (Jim) Otton (PhD77)  
Richard W (Rick) Switzer  
Earl R Verbeek (PhD75)  
Karen J Wenrich (MS71, PhD75)  
Joey Rosen  
Joe Tomich  
Kyle Yoder  

 


Faculty 

Roger Cuffey, Dick Parizek & Bob Schmalz (cross-country), Duff GoldRuss Dutcher

Where They Stayed

YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana

Main Projects

Line Creek, Elk Basin, Clark's Fork, Rattlesnake Mountain, Beartooth Front

 

Another picture and remembrances about the 1968 Penn State Field Camp.

Boies, Earl and Wade at 1968 Field Camp
Every field camp ends.  Often they end in the Deike parking lot.  Boies, Earl, and Wade wait to be picked up. Credit: Karen Wenrich

Comments on the 1968 Penn State Geosciences Field Camp

Dave Eggler remembers that he took the group to outcrops in the Colorado Front Range for a couple of days.  "I got my PhD at CU in 1967 and had started a post-doc at Penn State in E F Osborn's experimental petrology lab.  But I returned to Boulder in the summer to have some fun and do some field work with Ed Larson in the Flattops wilderness north of Glenwood Springs.  I met the group just west of Golden.  I'd never actually been to the Precambrian outcrops that we visited as we drove west in in Clear Creek Canyon, but I knew the general geology, and my CU advisor, Bill Braddock, suggested the stops.  After that we turned north.  The picture with the till is just south of Winter Park. Everyone's leaning on my white Datsun station wagon.  We camped overnight at Grand Lake, west of Rocky Mtn National Park.  Next day we drove through Rocky Mtn Natl Park and then west of Fort Collins.  I'd mapped that country with the USGS.  I remember talking with Bob Schmalz, who was riding with me, about every outcrop we passed.  I was supposed to talk about a few outcrops in my thesis area, the Virginia Dale ring-dike complex, on the Colorado-Wyoming border.  But the group was running late, so we stood in the outer ring and I talked about five minutes.  Then they headed north into Wyoming, and I returned to Boulder."

From the YBRA Annual Meeting Minutes, courtesy of Russ & Linda Dutcher: "Penn State would have 15 students -- 13 from Penn State and 2 from Rice.  It would be taught by Gold and Dutcher."

Rick Switzer, president and CEO of Altima Resources Ltd. of Vancouver, B.C., writes that "I often think of those cross-country days sleeping with the chiggers in Kansas and the 80 mph posted speed limit which I believe we were able to exceed.  There are many other indelible memories as I in fact made two cross-country trips and was at the YBRA for two summers: one for field camp and the other posing as working for Dr. Dutcher for a summer education program for earth science high school teachers.  I am delighted to be able link up after so many years.  Please pass on my regards to alumni you have been able to contact.  It would be a pleasure to share some old stories and photographs.... Long story short, I have had a great career in the oil and gas industry coming from working for Texaco out of New Orleans (after PSU) to Calgary, Alberta to work for Amoco on the Grand Banks offshore program in the early seventies.  A couple other highlights are that I worked for industry icon T. Boone Pickens at Mesa prior to being a cofounder of an exploration company in Calgary.  From there I have done consulting and moved up the food chain with public companies.  I like what I do, however I miss the old days when the rigs were wood and the men were made of iron.
     [In regard to the picture at Indiana Dunes] my kids (I started late -- two girls -- 14 and 16, and a son 24) were wondering why everyone appeared to be listening and I was playing in the sand.  I think that's what the professors also wondered from time to time....  In the Spanish Peaks -- I can't remember whether that was '68 or '69 -- one of our alumni grunted at a nearby buffalo, and that's when I learned first hand just how fast they can charge!
     One time Boise Hall and I had a few too many at Wally's Red Rug (or Red something).  That's when we went to the next bar, where I was punched out big time by a very large cowboy who didn't like skinny kids from the east.... Then the police came, and I was led to the police car, in which my partner in the back, once they opened the door, was a German shepherd, who attempted to eat me.  Somehow we were let go or escaped or the constabulary thought I had had enough.  I do remember a black eye for a few days!  I think that was about the end of any drinking days for me."

Earl Verbeek confirms that "Rick was correct.  Wally's Red Rug was the bar that we frequented (all too often) in Red Lodge....  ...One of my other memories is of cases of Coors beer being brought back to State College so we students could experience the golden fluid of the West.  Coors could not be bought in PA beer distributors back then, of course -- it had to be 'imported,' and Russ Dutcher treated us to that.  How strange to think that in later years I lived within 0.5 mile of that brewery."

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images: (thanks to Russ & Linda Dutcher for the Gene Williams and Little Bear Creek images, to Karen Wenrich for the others, and to Karen and Earl Verbeek for the identifications)

 

Alumni Field Camp 1968 Photos
       
Cowrey State Park, Kansas. Bob Schmalz examines lithologies.
Snowball fight at 10,000 ft on the west Spanish Peak, Colorado  L to r: Boies, Rich, Kyle, Jim, Rick (with camera), Joey R
Spanish Peaks and southern Rockies  Surrounding Bob Brown's car are, l to r: Bob Schmalz, Boies, Kyle, Rich, Rick, Joe T, Bob Brown, Bernie
Barbara and Bob Schmalz in camp
Stopping in till in the central Rockies near the continental divide  L to r: Duff, Rich, Jim, John (white T-shirt), Joe T, Earl. Dick Parizek between John & Joe, Bob Brown in plaid shirt, Bob Schmalz at far right
Central Rockies, Colorado
Closeup of people in the Central Rockies picture  L to r: Kyle, Joe T, ??, ??, Rick
Wind River Canyon, Wyoming  Earl, Bob Schmalz, John, Duff looking for beer
Gene Williams crossing a creek  This photo was labeled 1968 but may well be from another year.
Karen Wenrich & Earl Verbeek at Little Bear Creek, Beartooth Plateau, Montana
closeup of Karen and Earl
Towne Point near Red Lodge, in the Beartooth Front mapping area  L to r: ??, Rit Gruber, Earl, Boies, Wade
Travertine hot springs deposit, Mammoth, Yellowstone. Duff Gold on top
Craters of the Moon, Idaho  Standing: Jim, Earl, Duff Gold, guy from Rice, Wade
Earl and Boies hoisting scoria blocks at Craters
Campground. Earl, Rit (foregnd), Jim, Russ Dutcher (napping), Joe T
Favorite pastime on the cross-country trip. Joe T, Boies Hall, Jim Otton Van Hise's Rock, Baraboo, WI. John?, Boies, Dick Parizek Dodge City, Kansas. Earl, Kyle, Barbara Schmalz (foreground). Back of them: Joey R, Rich, Boies Not-so-exciting Kansas. Joe T, Dick Parizek, Jim
Jackson Lake and the Grand Tetons.  L to r: Bob Brown, Joe T, Kyle, Bernie (blue shirt), guy from Rice, Wade, Boies (00), Earl, John (red coat)



  

 

Field Camp 1969

Some of the group at the Thom Library, YBRA. Sitting, l to r: Nancy "Tumbleweed" Mariella from Rice, Dick Beardsley, Joe Jellick, Fred Batschelet, unidentified, Cal McKee. Kneeling in middle: Larry Bennett. Standing, l to r: Ken Walters, Mike Arden, Art Thorn, Keith Wilson. Thanks to Russ & Linda Dutcher for the image.

Field Camp 1969

Students
In 1969 the Geological Sciences Major included options in Geophysics, Geochemistry-Mineralogy-Petrology, and Geology.  Geology and G-M-P required Geol 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic terms and summer Geol 472, Field Geology.  Thanks to Dick Beardsley, Karen Wenrich, David Herman, Linton Wildrick, and Joe Head for identifying students in the photographs.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Michael P Arden  
Fred Batschelet  
Richard W (Dick) Beardsley  
Lawrence S (Larry) Bennett  
George B Burgess  
Bill Fuchs  
Joe Head  
Joseph R (Joe) Jellick  
David E Herman  
John W (Jack) Hess (PhD74)  
Robert M Lanning  
Nancy Mariella (Rice University, BA 1970)  
John W McCormick  
Calvin J McKee  
Arthur B Thorn, III  
Ken Walters  
Linton L Wildrick  
Keith Wilson  

 

 

Faculty
    Roger Cuffey (cross-country field trip, which went to California and Washington), Duff Gold, Russ Dutcher

TA
 
   Geoffrey B (Geoff) Newton (PhD, 1970)

Where They Stayed
    YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana

Main Projects
    Elk Basin, Clark's Fork, Rattlesnake Mountain, Beartooth front

 

Comments on the 1969 Penn State Geosciences Field Camp

Relaxing on the back porch of Fanshawe Lodge, YBRA

Relaxing on the back porch of Fanshawe Lodge, YBRA.  Fred Batschelet standing in the right foreground.  Photo courtesy Joe Head.

Dick Beardsley calls field camp "the most delightful time in my geologic life; it will make me proud to be part of the fossil record along with the rest of the group."

David Herman explains that "I was a geophysics major until just before the camp.  I switched to geological sciences in part so I could attend the camp.  I drove one of the vans, and I do recall making a few turns without waiting for the van behind.  On a couple of occasions Professor Dutcher missed the turn because I did not wait for him.  He was not very happy with me, rightfully so, and I was pretty embarrassed.  We had a great trip and it was one of the greatest experiences of my life.  We watched the first lunar landing... on a black and white TV in Red Lodge.  While I did not pursue a career in Geology or the sciences, the education I received at Penn State and the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences was outstanding.  Professors Dutcher and Gold were terrific."

Linton Wildrick writes that the trip "was my first time west of the Rockies. Soon after I moved to Seattle for grad school and have been in Washington State ever since. I have been back to Red Lodge once, having driven through with my wife and kids about 1990.  Goodness, how memory fails.  I recognize many faces but not many names.  We were at YBRA with kids from Rice U. and Princeton, so some of them may be in the Thom Lodge photo.   I barely recognized myself and Dave in the Yellowstone photo -- I still have that type haircut, though not quite so puffy as the old Afro style and now mostly gray.  The guy wearing the white hat, two places to my left, I think is Joe Head, who was a long distance runner back before 'Marathoner' became a common term.  I remember jogging with him once from Red Lodge; I had to hitchhike up the dirt road to YBRA from the main highway, while he kept right on going."

Death Valley Trail MarathonJoe HeadJoe Head is still running long-distance.  The photo to right shows him in 2008 when he returned to Death Valley [he was a field assistant there in 1967] to celebrate turning 60 by running the Death Valley Trails Marathon. The picture was taken at the top of Red Pass [5280'] twelve miles into the race, just before he had the thrill of running downhill for 14 miles, dropping over a mile in elevation in the process.  He is now a Physician's Assistant for an Internal Medicine practice in the foothills of the Blue Ridge mountains about 35 miles east of Asheville, NC.  "From sandstones and siltstones to gallstones and kidney stones!  I've always enjoyed the two photos of Dr. Dutcher [on the 1969 page].  Along the final drive up to Red Lodge just before the start of the summer season, we encountered some snow 'at higher elevations.'  I don't recall whose idea it was, but the whole caravan stopped, and we had a snowball fight right on the spot.  Unfortunately one of the snowballs shattered the windshield of the vehicle I was riding in.  After it happened everyone breathed a collective sigh of relief when it was discovered that Dr. Dutcher had thrown the guilty snowball.  We had him make another snowball, then pose beside the damaged vehicle.  Also in that shot, beside Dr. Cuffey, are students Bob Lanning, George Burgess and John McCormick.
     At the time Dr. Dutcher was my academic advisor, he had a framed sketch hanging on the wall  behind his desk.  We had a grad student in the Department that was a gifted artist.  He often would make pen and ink sketches with geological themes.  The sketch in Dr. Dutcher's office showed a very intimidating geology professor standing beside a fledgling student pointing out over a vast mountainous panorama and simply saying, 'Map it!'  I was thinking of that sketch when I snapped this photo of our group the first day we saw Elk Basin.
     There usually was no TV in the Lodge at YBRA. Because Duff Gold was assigned to receive some of the moon rocks, there was big interest in the first lunar landing. The 'powers that be' went into Red Lodge and rented a TV, then set it up in the Lodge. Our regular course work was suspended for a couple of days and we just hung out around the TV set. I still remember going outside that first night after the Apollo 11 lunar module had landed, gazing up at the moon, and marveling that men were actually there even as I looked at it. I deliberately got my camera out and took a picture of the moon before going to sleep that night."

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images: (thanks to Russ & Linda Dutcher and to Joe Head for the images) Some of the students in the photos were from the Princeton group that was at YBRA.

 

Alumni Field Camp 1969 Photos
       
Clarks Fork Canyon, with Mike Arden working, as always
Map It! The group first encounters Elk Basin, led by Russ Dutcher. See the remarks by Joe Head on the 1969 comments webpage.  L to R: Jack Hess, Mike Arden, Dick Beardsley, Russ Dutche
YBRA Lodge, the moment that Neil Armstrong first set foot on the moon
The moon with men on it for the first time, YBRA
Duff Gold's two daughters at Hebgen Lake
The gang at Hebgen Lake.  Duff Gold's daughters are down by the water's edge. Bob Lanning is on the roof in a red jacket and wearing a white cowboy hat. Nancy Mariella [Rice University] is the girl sitting on the railing.
Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone  Robbie Gold at the far right
Waiting for Old Faithful, Yellowstone  (l to r) David Herman, Linton Wildrick, Bill Fuchs, Joe Head with the white hat, Larry Bennett. John McCormick second from right, Keith Wilson on far right.
Group at the Royal Gorge Group at Clay Butte Closeup of the Clay Butte group  Bob Lanning at far left, Joe Jellick in the pink sweater, Cal McKee directly behind him, John McCormick second from right in the red jacket. Drs. Cuffey and Dutcher about to pose after Russ Dutcher shattered the window of a vehicle during a snowball fight, Beartooths.  Also in the photo are (L to R) Bob Lanning, George Burgess, and John McCormick
Petrified Tree, Yellowstone  George Burgess at left with brown hat, Bob Lanning second from right, Keith Wilson fifth from right (on fence), Linda Flueckinger Dutcher in blue blouse
Top of the World Bar, July 12, Beartooth Pass, 10,800 ft
On the Indiana Turnpike, trip home  Larry Bennett in center, Mike Arden on right
 

 

 Group photo of the 1970 Penn State Geosciences Field Camp

Group photo. Thanks to Russ & Linda Dutcher for this image and the accompanying photo in the photogallery below, and to Jeff Peffer and Jim Shaulis for the identifications.  Standing, l to r: Dan Stephens (white T-shirt), Dan Smith (with glasses, behind Dan), Dave Keck (beside Dan), Jack Conrad (black coat), Jeff Peffer, unidentified, Bill Bruck (pencils in pocket), John Gunnett (yellow shirt), Rob Rahsman, Ron Hicks, Doug Hill, Jim Warg.  Sitting or kneeling, l to r: Jim Shultz, Rick Roulin, unidentified (kneeling behind), Jim Shaulis, Russ Dutcher, Mansell Jones, Rick Miller.

Field Camp 1970

Students
In 1970 the Geological Sciences Major included options in Geophysics, Geochemistry-Mineralogy-Petrology, and Geology.  Geology and G-M-P required Geol 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic terms and summer Geol 472, Field Geology.  In 1970 an optional pre-camp cross-country excursion was formalized as Geol 471.  Thanks to Jeff Peffer and Jim Shaulis for the names.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
William F Bruck  
Jack Conrad  
John W Gunnett  
Ronald E Hicks  
Douglass G Hill, Jr.  
Mansell Jones  
David A Keck  
Richard W (Rick) Miller  
Jeffrey R (Jeff) Peffer  
Robert G Rahsman, II  
Richard M Roulin  
James R Shaulis  
James A Shultz  
Daniel D Smith  
Daniel B (Dan) Stephens  
Jim Warg  
Stanley M Woodring  

Faculty (thanks to Jeff Peffer)

   Roger Cuffey (cross-country field trip), Duff Gold, Russ Dutcher

Where They Stayed
    YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana

Main Projects (thanks to Jeff Peffer)
   Beartooth Front (main project), Elk Basin, Stillwater chromite mine

 

Comments on the 1970 Penn State Geosciences Field Camp

Jeff Peffer on the 1970 schedule: "I believe the schedule for the 1970 field camp was altered slightly to allow more time for the final independent mapping of the Beartooth Front.  The Local Photo Exercise on July 6th was field mapping of the basal Cambrian units (Flathead Fm, Woosey Fm & Meagher Fm.) in the Little Bear Creek area, up on the Beartooth Block in Park County, WY.  This mapping was on a photo base map.  The time allotted to the Stillwater Complex was for looking at this LMI and mapping structural features at the chromite mine.  Barry Voight was along on the Yellowstone/Tetons trip.  The Bighorn Basin Trip was mapping of Elk Basin.  The Independent Mapping was the main project: mapping the Beartooth Front."

Jeff on Roger Cuffey and the cross-country trip: "I can't imagine a more capable and better-natured professor than Roger Cuffey, ideally suited to take an odd mixture (varying from motley to clean-cut) of geology students across the country in 1970.  On the way to field camp we acquired a good appreciation not only for the Geology of North America, but also for the American heartland.  There are two Roger Cuffey stories about small towns in the Midwest that frequently come to mind when I think about that summer's cross-country field trip.

     On one occasion, he took the crew of students to a small restaurant for breakfast in a small Midwestern town (I believe it was somewhere in Kansas).  We overwhelmed the restaurant staff with the size of our crew.  While we could hear the high school band practicing on Main Street, our bunch volunteered to serve as waiters/waitresses.  We served ourselves and others in the small-town restaurant. I can still remember members of our crew walking around the restaurant with coffee pots in their hands, filling up coffee cups.  It was a fun and memorable meal.

     Later in the trip, we rolled into another Midwestern town after a long, hot day.  I don't think we were headed for a camping site with showers, so Dr. Cuffey had us pull up to the town's swimming pool.  He got out and talked to the pool's staff, and we were invited to take a swim at no charge.  Next, the odd crew of PSU Geology students are swimming and having another fun time with the folks from another small Midwestern town.  Like the breakfast a few days before, it was a memorable time."

Jeff on a lucky find on the cross-country trip: "During the cross-country trip to Field Camp in 1970, one of our vehicles had a flat tire in Southwest Utah.  While setting up to fix the flat, I picked up some rocks along the side of the road to block the front tires so we could fix the flat.  Fortunately, one of these was a large clouded agate.  After field camp, I cut this clouded agate into a large triangular prism and polished it.  For decades this clouded agate has been on my desk as one of my favorite paper weights."

And Jeff tells the story of the snake in the john: "My field partner and I were mapping about two (2) miles to the east of the YBRA Camp when a rattlesnake literally crossed our path.  There was another crew nearby, one member of which had wanted a rattlesnake skin as a trophy, so we called them over.  Now it's the four (4) PSU Geology students versus the rattlesnake. The poor thing got pinned down with a stick and literally lost his head, as one of the group was packing a knife.   Rather than carry the dead snake around for the rest of the day, we interrupted mapping and carried it back to Camp.  We went into the bathrooms just upslope of Fanshawe Lodge, so that the bearer of the dead snake could clean it up.  Dr. Dutcher was sitting in one of the stalls while the dead snake was getting cleaned up.  He was sitting in the stall for quite some time.  I guess dealing with a bunch of undergraduate Geology students at field camp can be a constipating experience.  A discussion ensued about tossing the snake around his feet while he was in the stall.  I left the bathroom, as I couldn't witness the deed.  I'm not certain that the prank happened, but I'm fairly sure that it did.  I believe that the poor dead snake got flung around Dr. Dutcher's feet while he was in the stall, and he reportedly never flinched when it happened." [In 2008 Russ Dutcher recalled several snake stories over the years, but not this one.  He suggests that the story may be apocryphal.  After reading Russ' comment, Jeff agrees that the incident probably didn't happen.  He adds that the snake skin should be mounted on a wall in Texas and that Dave Keck was the bearer of the dead snake.]

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images: (thanks to Jeff Peffer for the images, and to Dan Stephens for the gas pump picture)

 

Alumni Field Camp 1970 Photos
       
Same group photo as at the top of the page, but with Duff Gold instead of Russ Dutcher. Rick Miller is now standing second from the right.
Schedule, from Jeff Peffer  Note the rm & bd charge!
schedule p. 2, with equipment needed
XC trip on the Great Plains. Roger Cuffey talking to Jim Shaulis (white T-shirt) and, to Roger's right, Rick Miller.
Roadcut on the XC trip
XC trip, goofing around in the Rockies
Roger filling a vehicle on the XC trip. Note the price!
Garden of the Gods, Colorado.
Beartooth Front, looking west. Fanshawe Lodge in the foreground

 

 

  

 

 Field Camp 1971


Fanshawe Lodge, YBRA. Back row, l to r: Dan Murray, Bob Lenhart, Claude Bolze. Front row: Fred Peter, Chris Langton, Sandy Mino, Kathy Dyer, Steve Johnson (holding Albert Ogden), Larry Smyers (bandana), Tom Nicholson.  To Steve's left are Jackie and Duff Gold and children, and behind Duff Ray Wells. Thanks to Tom Nicholson for the identifications.

Field Camp 1971

Students
In 1971 the Geological Sciences Major included options in Geophysics, Geochemistry-Mineralogy-Petrology, and Geology.  Geology and G-M-P required Geol 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic terms and summer Geol 472, Field Geology.  A pre-camp cross-country excursion was available as Geol 471.  Most of these names are from the database of 1972 Geological Sciences alumni that, hopefully, is a proxy for 1971 field camp, although some may have attended a year earlier or a year later.  Some of these alumni, in addition, may have been geophysics option, so would not have attended field camp.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Kenneth R Ainsworth  
Walter F Ebaugh (MS73)  
Jeffrey L Ewald  
Kimball E Goddard  
Stephen A Johnson  
Christine A Langton  
John W Mentz  
Robert J Lenhart  
Cynthia J Makarczyk  
Dan L Murray  
Thomas J Nicholson  
Albert E Ogden  
Robert S Pekarik  
Fred S Peter, Jr.  
Kathy Dyer Peter  
Larry F Smyers  
Sandra Mino Todd  
Joseph S Tomalavage  
Ray E Wells  
Claude E Bolze  

Faculty
   Roger Cuffey (3-week cross-country field trip), Duff Gold, Barry Voight

Where They Stayed
    YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana

Main Projects
  
Elk Basin, Beartooth front, Heart Mountain detachment, Stillwater project, chrome mine

The YBRA Annual Meeting Minutes, courtesy of Russ & Linda Dutcher: "The Field Course dates were July 7- August 15 and would have an estimated 24 students.  At the YBRA meeting 11/2/71, 'D. Gold reported that Penn State University has decided that the YBRA facilities will be the base for their field course operation on a continuing basis, and in addition that PSU would make a financial commitment to YBRA'."

 

Recollections of the 1971 Penn State Geosciences Field Camp

Bill Pierce of the USGS talks at Silvergate, Heart Mountain
Bill Pierce of the USGS talks at Silvergate, Heart Mountain

Memorable quote
   Walt Ebaugh: "It was surely the best.  I learned almost everything I know about geology that summer."

The van mirror incident. Barry Voight: "It was on this trip that a remarkable and frightening incident occurred.  We were driving, as I recall, south on the highway along the Madison River. I can't remember where we were coming from, as I don't think we went to Dillon that year.  Anyway we were in a couple of Dept Chevy carryalls.  Steve Johnson was driving the van I was in. Another Chevy van was coming the opposite way, and both vans were not far off the centerline. The side mirrors stuck out rather far on those vans. Anyway, the mirrors from the two vans struck at a relative speed of 120 mph.  The mirrors shattered and a spray of glass ran down the side of the car.  I suppose the back windows were closed, and my memory is vague, but I think Steve caught some of this on the side of his head and arm. He may have been wearing sunglasses, protecting his eyes. It shook all of us at the time as I recall, as people could have been blinded, and the driver might have lost total control of the van.
     We patched up his arm and kept moving.  We stopped at the Hebgen Earthquake area shortly afterwards. Steve is in the photos with a bandaged arm (under the collapsed outhouse, for instance)."

Barry also remembers that "Albert Ogden was interested in caving, so one weekend we drove to the Bighorns to go down a famous cave there, rappelling into a glory hole; nice cave, loaded with gypsum crystals."

Duff remembers the "flying, wing-flapping Suburbans" and the "year of the cowboy shootouts" (with Bruntons)

Ray Wells also remembers the mirror incident: "Yes, 1971 was a memorable summer.
     Steve Johnson was driving, elbow out the window; I think I was riding shotgun or back righthand side. It was a hot afternoon, all the windows were open, and most everyone was asleep. All of a sudden, POW! Glass everywhere.  Tom Nicholson was in the back seat and was covered with glass fragments, and Steve's forearm was cut in a couple of places. Only Steve got cut, as I recall. Our side mirror hit the side mirror of an oncoming camper, I think.  The mirrors had to be at the same height, so I don't think it was a big truck. Steve would know.
     Lots of good stories from that summer. I still have some good pictures of the caving expedition to Bighorn Caverns, where I recall we hooked our rappel rope to the axle of the Suburban above the pit entrance."

Tom Nicholson: "I was at YBRA in the summer of 1971 and am in two of your photographs.  In the first photo I am walking with Steve Johnson (he is on the right with the wild yellow hair) and I am on the left in a red t-shirt.  Steve was very funny and kept us laughing all summer....  I can identify virtually everyone in the group photo but probably could not recognize any of them today.  Thanks so much for posting the photographs.  I really miss those wonderful days."

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images:

 

Alumni Field Camp 1971 Photos
       
Albert Ogden at Red Lodge
White Mtn, Heart Mtn area
Sunlight Basin, looking toward Dead Indian Hill
Sunlight Basin, site of the Heart Mtn detachment  credit: Barry Voight
Mr. Brown in Cooke City -- Rommel, leader of the Africa corps, points to Cairo
Silvergate (Heart Mtn), with Bill Pierce
Bill Pierce (USGS) at Silver Gate, Heart Mtn area
Students at Hebgen Quake area: Tom Nicholson (left) and Steve Johnson (see story above)
smashed outhouse, but note Steve Johnson's arm beneath
bear in campground
Bighorn Mtns 
Beartooth lookout 
Elk Basin
Elk Basin

 

 



  

 

 Field Camp 1972

Group at Top of the World "Open Bar," Beartooth Pass. Kneeling, l to r: Rich Leishman, Woody Lutz, Chuck Malick, Dave Houseknecht, John Miller, Bill Schweller.  Standing, l to r: Art Montana, Joe Drahuschak, Jesse Costolo, John Hill, Lance Anderson, Dave Froehlich, Barry Voight, Fred Schriefer, John Roth, Bob Hershey, Mel Podwysocki, Skip Colflesh, Bill Franz, Larry Meyers, Mary Karandosovski McGuire (behind Mark's hat), Mark Jacobson, Brian Beard. Thanks to Hank Reif for the photo and identifications.

Field Camp 1972

Students
In 1972 the Geological Sciences Major included options in Geophysics, Geochemistry-Mineralogy-Petrology, and Geology.  Geology and G-M-P required Geol 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic terms and summer Geol 472, Field Geology.  A pre-camp cross-country excursion was available as Geol 471. Thanks to Hank Reif for the names of those attending.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Lance C Anderson  
Brian Beard  
Skip Colflesh  
(Jesse) Houston Costolo, III  
Joseph M (Joe) Drahuschak, Jr.  
Bill Franz  
David J (Dave) Froehlich  
Robert M (Bob) Hershey  
John H Hill  
David W (Dave) Houseknecht  
Mark Jacobson  
Mary Karandosovski McGuire  
Richard G (Rich) Leishman  
Sherwood S (Woody) Lutz  
Charles A (Chuck) Malick  
Larry Meyers  
John J Miller, Jr.  
Henry E (Hank) Reif, Jr.  
Robert W Reynolds  
John E Roth  
Fred E Schriefer  
William J (Bill) Schweller  
W T Williams  

 

Faculty (thanks to Hank Rief)
   Deane Smith (cross-country), Barry Voight, Art (Boettcher) Montana, Derrill Kerrick (Dillon project)

TA
   Mel Podwysocki (MS68, PhD74)

Where They Stayed
    YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana

Main Projects
   Elk Basin, Beartooth front,
Heart Mountain detachment, Dillon metamorphics in the Ruby Range

From the YBRA Annual Meeting Minutes, courtesy of Russ & Linda Dutcher: "Penn State will have 26 students in camp off and on for 5 weeks beginning July 11.  Their group will be led by Art Boettcher with 4 other faculty members."

1972 Group YBRA Field Camp
YBRA, July 17.  Kneeling: Mel Podwysocki, Patti Podwysocki, Rich Leishman, Chuck Malick, Hank Reif, Dave Froelich, Skip Colflesh, Jesse Costolo. Standing: John Miller, Joe Drahuschak, Fred Schriefer, ?, Bill Franz, Bob Hershey, Dave Houseknecht, Larry Meyers, John Hill, Mary Karadosovki McGuire, John Roth, Mark Jacobson, Lance Anderson. Thanks to Hank Reif for the photo.
 

Recollections About the 1972 Penn State Geosciences Field Camp

Hank Reif writes that the group photo was "taken July 14, 1972 at Beartooth Pass when we stumbled on the "Top Of The World Bar" sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce of Red Lodge, Montana. Many of us stepped away to take our own picture....  Our Cross Country and Summer Field Camp had a diversity of people -- sophomores, juniors, graduate students, faculty, and visitors."

Skip Colflesh remembers...  "Dr. Boettcher was rushing us across a mapping site high up in Rattlesnake Canyon.  I finally got near him and just as I did, there was a cracking sound and I jumped to another level as a few tons of rock slid down the slope from under my feet.  You [Barry Voight] were higher up slope to my left and as the dust cleared, we heard you yelling and saw you jumping up and down with apparent joy!  You told me at camp that you had gotten a photo of the rock slide, just as I was landing.
     Later I got caught on a ledge at Cathedral Cliffs, trying to get a sample of the basalt sill.
  We had found basalt sills that were dated and changed the way the area was interpreted.  I ended up getting off the slope on my own, and Barry said it was a terrific climb."

Art Montana and Barry Voight remember an injury: "On the 4th of July, it began to snow.  The students were working near Ruby Creek on the Range Front.  In running for cover, one tumbled over a 15-foot cliff.  We carried him to Russ Dutcher's Land Rover in a makeshift stretcher and drove to camp. We then commandeered the Red Lodge "ambulance," which was nothing but a station wagon, driven by Joanie Beitel's father, to take us to Billings. We had the student on an IV all the way on the high-speed drive, having to hold the bottle out of the rear window to keep it elevated.
     The docs wouldn't operate without his parents' permission, but the situation became critical, and they went ahead and removed his ruptured spleen. We couldn't reach his parents in Wilkes-Barre, so I called the sheriff, and he tracked him down, although the operation was underway by then.  His parents flew out and took him home.
     During all that, we were wearing green doctors shirts, because our shirts had been used to make a stretcher by running poles up the sleeves.  The shirts also gave us access to the student's room as we wished.  In fact, we were addressed as "Doctor" (which we were, sort of) by some of the staff." [Skip Colflesh has informed us that the student was Brian Beard.]

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge: (thanks to Hank Reif and Skip Colflesh for the photos)

 

Alumni Field Camp 1972 Photos
       
Horizontal rocks. Must be on the trip out. 
swimming
Field Camp Alumni 1972
mine tour? 
petrified wood 
Campgrounds on the XC trip. Thanks to Skip. 
Shell Canyon, Wyoming 
Top of the World Bar, Beartooth Highway 
Top of the world  Same photo as top of the page, different scan
Snow at YBRA 
more snow at YBRA 
Stillwater, Montana 
Packed in the Tetons 
Mary McGuire on the right
around the campfire 
bear in Yellowstone 
somewhere in Arizona?
 

 Field Camp 1973

Field Camp 1973

Students
In 1973 the Geological Sciences Major included options in Geophysics, Geochemistry-Mineralogy-Petrology, and Geology.  Geology and G-M-P required Geol 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic terms and summer Geol 472, Field Geology.  A pre-camp cross-country excursion was available as Geol 471.  Thanks to Art Montana and Paul Zell for the names of students attending in 1973.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Robert H Birk  
Earl H Detra  
Reuel F Emery  
Donald Fend  
Robert E Hike  
Edward Kaczanowicz  
Lawrence M (Larry) Kelley  
Garry M Kramchak  
George W Kranich  
Raymond J (Ray) McGlew, III  
Jon R Moyer  
Robert J Nichols  
Carl Palmer  
Robert Reynolds  
David Richers  
Russell (Russ) Ritenour  
Ronald L Schmiermund (MS 77)  
James S Snyder  
Richard Sterzen  
James Stevens  
John Switek  
Charles W (Chuck) Yurchick  
Michael R (Mike) Zamell  
Paul D Zell  

 

Faculty
     Deane Smith (cross-country, including Canada), Art (Boettcher) Montana, Duff Gold, Barry Voight, Derrill Kerrick (Dillon exercise)

TA
   Earl Verbeek (PhD75)

Where They Stayed
   YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana

Main Projects (thanks to Paul Zell, who kept the entire itinerary!)
   Line Creek, Elk Basin, Clark's Fork Canyon, Stillwater, Beartooth front, Rattlesnake Canyon, Little Bear Creek, Heart Mtn detachment, Yellowstone-Tetons trip, Dillon metamorphics in the Ruby Range

Some Recollections of the 1973 Field Camp

Some Recollections of the 1973 Field Camp

The cross country trip included the Muskegon, Michigan waste disposal project, Baraboo, the Duluth Complex, taconite mines, Calgary, Banff, Sullivan Mine, and Butte.

Paul Zell recalls that before crossing the border into Canada, "I can still remember Duff telling us ahead of time  'I know some of you use marijuana, just make sure you don't have any of it when we cross the border into Canada.'  For some reason, the Department hasn't run its field camp field trips into Canada since."  Duff remembers that in fact the group was searched for several hours at the border.

Earl Detra adds on the crossing: "Ah, yes, the border incident.  It did happen.  We spent most of an evening there being searched.  We all thought it was kind of funny except for a few of the perpetrators who knew what was going on.  Then it got real serious when the agents started searching the microscopes.   As a consequence our schedule was upset and we missed an appointment the next day."

Earl, commenting on the picture of the lake near Kenora:  "Yes, we were swimming in the lake.  Probably not advisable after sitting in vehicles for two weeks.  After eating lunch, Duff pulled a Tarzan act and dove into the lake and started swimming for the far shore.  Not wanting to be shown up, we all followed.  About half way across one swimmer came down with some pretty severe cramps and needed a tow."

Paul remembers "a great time in Canada after the border incident, especially at the hot spring near Banff.  A minor incident occurred in Calgary.  One morning we left camp and drove to the Geological Survey of Canada office.  After we got there, we had to send Deane Smith back to pick up his daughter at the campground.  She was assigned to the faculty van, but sometimes rode with the geology students.  Deane's excuse was 'I thought she was with you guys.' "

Ray McGlew remembers "a large cloud of smoke at the last campsite before we re-entered the U.S.  Some of the campers were using the last of the stuff stored in the microscopes that had not been searched previously."

Further thoughts from Earl: "I remember the Heart Mountain project.  We all dreaded it when Barry Voight pulled out the binocs.  He was sure to find something up on that ridge a few hundred feet above us that we just had to go see.  I also remember that we couldn't tour the Sunshine Mine because of the disaster there the year before.  The Sunshine Mine is/was a well-known silver producer in the Silver Valley in northern Idaho.  They had a mine fire in 1972.  I think some 68 miners were killed."  [Art Montana, a former underground miner, states that in fact 91 miners were killed.]

Barry Voight remembers a tuna fish incident: "I remember once with Boettcher we stopped for groceries in Cody before driving into Sunlight Basin and doing a multiple day camping/mapping exercise up in Dead Indian Creek.  In the grocery store, Art asked me whether I had ever heard of a particular brand of tuna fish he was contemplating buying for his dinner.  Yes, I told him, I'd heard of it.  It was a very good brand.  So he put a couple of cans in his cart and kept going.
     Later that day we started hiking in, and as usual Art was pushing somewhat harder than the students could comfortably go.  I could keep up with him OK, so we got to a campsite and had set up camp before a lot of the students arrived.  The path was clear enough, so there was no chance of their getting lost; it was just a question of time, crossing creeks and keeping up.  Anyway, over the campfires, groups were cooking dinner and Art was a little ahead of the rest, opening his tuna and making some kind of casserole.  When he was in the middle of his meal, a couple of students passed by the fire and noticed the labeling on the cans.  'Hey, Dr. Boettcher, how's your dinner?' they smirked.  'Is Nine-Lives really that good?'  It made their day." 

Ray remembered this incident also: "When we were deep in the woods at Heart Mountain [Art] was concerned about the tuna he bought at the last stop because it was a bit discolored.  It turns out that it was tuna cat food, which he ate anyway." 

Barry also remembers an encounter in Dillon during the metamorphics project: "In Dillon we ran into a character named Steve Malone who ran the Moose Bar, under 'Moose Rooms.' Anyway, Steve liked us but was just out of prison, having shot a customer for pulling the plug on the jukebox. He looked like Johnny Ringo, dressed in black with a silver studded belt, and a narrow moustache. If he bought you a whiskey, you drank it with a smile."

Art Montana recalls: "I was in charge of the 1973 camp, which lasted from July 3 to August 10. Deane Smith, Duff Gold, & Earl Verbeek arrived on the 3rd with the cross-country crew.  Two students were indeed caught with marijuana as that caravan crossed into Canada near Fort Frances, Ontario.
     One student, Chuck Yurchick, fell and was hit in the head by a falling rock while we were measuring the section in Clarks Fork Canyon. I took him to a specialist in Billings (Dr. Lewis Robinson), and Duff Gold flew with him to Pittsburgh on July 15th.
     Barry Voight showed up on the 21st day of camp (July 24) and took us to the Heart Mountain area. Kerrick arrived on the night of August 3rd to help with mapping in the Ruby Range. He went home on the 8th.
     On July 25, Barry and I took the students to Dead Indian Meadows and then up Pat O'Hara Mtn (long hike). The next morning, I hiked out, drove highways 120 & 208 to Red Lodge, picked up everyone's mail and then shopped for their grocery requests (mostly beer & canned goods). My pack on the hike back in to Dead Indian Meadows must have weighed a ton, but I knew that the students would appreciate my efforts.
     While we were working out of Colter Bay on July 30th, mapping the Gros Ventre slide and volcanic rocks in Yellowstone, a LARGE tree blew down across the two tents that housed the women. Fortunately, we were in the field at the time, or it would have been a disaster."

And Chuck Yurchick replies: "I am e-mailing you to say I really like the Alumni Field Camp site. It brings back a lot of good memories. Just wanted to let  you know that I did suffer a nasty concussion in Clark's Fork Canyon. I remember everything that happened that day. The ride to the Red Lodge hospital was an adventure. I saw two of everything during the 50+ miles of the trip.
     I remember the Fort Francis crossing. Our vehicle went through and we were ordering pizza, waiting for the others. Then we were called back and our vehicle and our persons were thoroughly searched! Never did get to eat the pizza! Ha! Ha!.  Also remember that Dr. Smith was like a little kid in a candy store when we collected jasper from a tailings pile in Soudan, Minnesota."

Ray McGlew sent this email after the 2008 reunion: "Returning to Penn State... made me realize what an important part of my past the department has been.  Although I only practiced geology for 11 years in the oil industry, the training and experience has helped me as I've worked in many other domains.  The experience of the many field trips (local trips as part of coursework, informal trips with the GeoSci club, and of course the two cross-country trips, first with Charlie Thornton and then with Duff, as well as Field Camp) added to my world-view not only concerning the geosciences, but also the softer side including meeting people from around the country.  So... many thanks to you for giving me a great start in my adult life.  I hope I can pay it forward to another generation!

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images:

 

Alumni Field Camp 1973 Photos
       
Van Hise's Rock, Wisconsin
Carleton, Minnesota
Virginia Park, Duluth, Minnesota
South of Kenora, Ontario  note swimmers in the water
Sulphur Mtn, Alberta
West of Calgary
Lake Louise
Athabasca Glacier, Alberta
Cross-country trip page 1  Thanks to Paul Zell
Cross-country trip page 2
Field camp schedule  Thanks to Paul Zell
Field camp schedule  Thanks to Paul Zell

 

 

Penn State 1974 Field Camp near Bartlesville, Oklahoma
Puzzled geologists in the Permian Basin near Bartlesville. Thanks to Joe Donovan for the photo and identifications.

Field Camp 1974

Students
In 1974 the Geological Sciences Major included options in Geophysics, Geochemistry-Mineralogy-Petrology, and Geology.  Geology and G-M-P required Geol 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic terms and summer Geol 472, Field Geology.  A pre-camp cross-country excursion was available as Geol 471.  Most of these names are from the database of 1975 Geological Sciences alumni that, hopefully, is a proxy for 1974 field camp, although some may have attended a year earlier or a year later.  Some of these alumni, in addition, may have been geophysics option, so would not have attended field camp.  Thanks to Nicholas Susak and Mike Canich for additional names.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Ed Boyle  
Roger Berger  
Ruth M Brennesholtz  
Jeffrey A Bruneau  
Rick Campbell  
Michael Canich (MS 76)  
Joe Donovan  
Dave Field  
James D Fritz  
William Jay Hoover  
Randy P Jones  
Jim T Kovach  
Michael E Moore  
Robert C Popovich  
Jayne Rava  
Archie Richardson  
R Randolph Say  
Jim Schad  
Vincent A Scovazzo  
Steven G Singer  
Nicholas J Susak  
Richard L Unger  
Debbie vanVleet  
James C Walter  
Arlene G Weiner  
Jack A Winkelman  
William E Wertz  

 Faculty (thanks to Nicholas Susak)

   Roger Cuffey and Charles Thornton (cross-country  trip), Duff Gold, Rob Scholten, Art Rose (Stillwater), Wayne Burnham, Art (Boettcher) Montana

Where they stayed (thanks to Nicholas Susak)
   YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana; Little Sheep Creek Campground, Lima, Montana; Western Montana College, Dillon

Main projects (thanks to Nicholas Susak and Art Montana)
   Elk Basin, Beartooth front, air photo mapping of the Lima area, Dillon metamorphics (Ruby Range), Stillwater, Precambrian basement in the Christensen Quad near Dillon

 

Joe Donovan Recalls the Cross-Country Trip in 1974

Joe Donovan Recalls the Cross-Country Trip in 1974
Penn State Geosciences Field Camp

Itinerary of field trip (this is from memory...):

1.  Stop 1: Skytop!!

2.  Cincinnati Arch fossil assemblages -- off I-70 in Ohio/Indiana somewhereJoe Donovan 1974 Field Camp

3.  Mississippian karst in Missouri; collapse sinkhole exposure

4.  Bartlesville OK area -- Permian sediments

5.  Kansas tour of bryzoans and Roger Cuffey's dissertation areas

6.  Mass arrest at dusk by KHP on I-70 12 miles east of Ft. Hays.  The KHP eastbound clocked the pace car going 85 westbound.  I'll never forget the sight of the bubble gum machines flashing as he nosedived across the median.....

7. Court appearance in Fort Hays by Cuffey and the Fort Hays Eight.  The rest of the group toured the old Sternberg Museum and looked at Cretaceous fish.

8. Colorado Front Range at Colorado Springs.  Garden of the Gods.  

9. Royal Gorge.  Front Range Geology at Canon City and along I-25

10. Volcanics and dikes from Pueblo -> Walsenburg

11. Day off in Spanish Peaks area

12. Start from Walsenburg to Durango on US 160.  Great Sand Dunes National Monument.  Rio Grande Rift

13. Alamosa.  Creede Caldera.  Continental Divide

14. Pagosa Springs.  Durango.  Four Corners geology.  Shiprock.  Mesa Verde.

15. One of the best Mexican restaurants in North America at Cortez, Colorado. 

16. Grand Canyon South Rim.  Return back to Utah

17. Arches.  Moab.  Mesozoic Stratigraphy.  Up to I-70 at Crescent Junction

18. Price and Helper, Utah.  Coal Mining in Jurassic and Cretaceous

19. Wasatch Front Range.  Earthquake hazards.  Bingham pit

20.  Drive around Great Salt lake to south.  Visit salt-flat and oolite deposits (Charles Thornton group: collects some ooid sand for drying flowers).  Visit Morton Salt operation

21.  Cross western Utah on I-70.  Enter Nevada.  Visit geothermal property at Beowawe.  Humboldt Sink.  Camp in Reno.  Pyramid Lake tufa mounds

22.  Over the top past Lake Tahoe. 

23.  Trinity Alps.  Susanville, CA.  The Gold Rush legacy.

24. East from Susanville on CA 44.  View of structural junction between Cascades, Great Basin, and Lassen Peak volcanics.  Distant view to SW of Lassen.

25.  Continue west on CA 299.  Cross Jurassic ophiolite between Redding and Eureka.  Camp near Eureka.

26.  Day off in Redwoods.  I went with Bruneau to Patrick's Point State Park on coast.  Got some fabulous photos -- all in B-W negatives (still have those and some prints at the house...)

27. Are you still with me?

28.  Crater lake, 2 days after the road was opened

29. Oregon Cascades tour (C P Thornton).  The Seven Sisters.  John Day, Oregon (Tertiary sediments).  Shield volcano topography.  Some recent flows. Columnar jointing.  Flow stratigraphy.  Recent Cascade eruptions. 

30.  Snake River Flood basalts.  Cross Idaho to I-84, take US20 to Craters of the Moon.  Day tour. 

31.  Cross over to West Yellowstone, camp.  Enter park at west entrance.  Tours of Upper Geyser basin, Norris basin.  I think we
camped at Geyser basin.  Grand Canyon of YR.  Specimen Ridge. Travertine pools at Mammoth (Gardiner).  It was empty at this time of year (still May).  Saw a buffalo herd in northeast of park.

32.  Leave Park by northeast entrance (Cooke City --> Red Lodge).  Highway had just been opened.  I think we just drove over to Red Lodge. Spectacular drive in early June of course!  I remember the Heart Mountain exercise, but I think Duff did that with us later on our Beartooth Plateau field trip. 

Whew.  That's all I can remember.  I saw what Walt said about field camp.  The XC trip was just as intense and perhaps more enduring.  Like field camp, many of the things one knows and understands about geology date back to this trip, in a photograph still in one's mind.  I have revisited perhaps 50% of the stops on the trip and am looking forward to revisiting  the other half.   I think what the camp did for you was showed you the backyard too quickly to really see everything, but it allowed you to tuck it all away for future reference.  It was why I first thought of going out west for my first job.  In hindsight, it is amazing how Roger and CPT came up with this plan, and how carefully crafted it was.  One could not put any price on the value of this experience.  It was the most productive summer of my career, with the possible exception of the 2nd year of my dissertation fieldwork.

I know I still have the maps in the office.  It would be fun to put together a Google earth itinerary of the field trip. 

From the YBRA Annual Meeting Minutes, courtesy of Russ & Linda Dutcher: "25 students are attending."

Nicholas Susak says there were at least two other students -- Archie and "Contour" Al -- and that Wayne Burnham (Department Chair) led the convoy home.  Actually, Art Montana also went back with the group.

Click on the thumbnails to view the images: (Thanks to Joe Donovan and Dave Field for the photos, all of which are on the cross-country trip.)

 

Alumni Field Camp 1974 Photos
       
Roger Cuffey's Speed Wagon
Geologists temporarily coocoo for bryozoans
Gassing up in Missouri
Roger Berger, Vince Scarvazzo, Arlene Weiner in Missouri
Jeff Bruneau at an outcrop in Kansas
The Plains
hike in the Spanish Peaks
closeup of chilled group in the Spanish peaks photo. Archie and Debbie vanVleet at the right.
Hogback of Dakota Sandstone near Canon City, Colorado
Closeup of people at the Dakota Sandstone hogback
Arches National Monument
Roger Cuffey expounds at Arches
The Bingham pit, near SLC. Note the old mining style -- steep pit walls and innumerable benches for rail cars.
Ooid shoals at the Great Salt Lake
Crater Lake snowdrifts
Jayne Rava by a snowdrift at Crater Lake
Charles Thornton in a lava field, Oregon
Al at Craters of the Moon, Idaho
Erratic on Specimen Ridge, Yellowstone
Thermopolis
Roger Cuffey lecturing in Kansas; Arlene Weiner next to Roger Granites in the Trinity Alps, CA Charlie Thornton at a gruss outcrop, Trinity Alps. Nick Susak in the dapper hat. Climbing up the Spanish Peaks
Resting on the Spanish Peaks hike Camping at Walsenberg, Colorado (Spanish Peaks.) Debbie Van Vleet and Archie Richardson folding their tent. Exploring Mesa Verde Coal stratigraphy at Price/Helper Utah. Mike Canich on the right and Jeff Bruneau on the left with the hat.
More coal, stratigraphy, Price/Helper Great Salt Lake Hot spring at Beowawe Geothermal Field, Nevada. Student in the purple hat is an undergrad, "Critter." Beowawe hot spring.
Roger Cuffey in the green hat, Charlie Thornton in the straw hat, Nick Susak in the dapper hat, Joe Donovan hamming it up in the center, Nick Scavazzo behind Joe. Patrick Point near Eureka, CA, at the Pacific Ocean. Archie Richardson and Debbie Van Vleet in the foreground.      

 

 

 

 Field Camp 1975


The Teton Wilderness group before their 100-mile hike. Front: ?, Wayne Narr, Bob Dickson, Rick ____. Rear: Mike Homiak, Carl Carson, Jerry Kuzior, Jim Ewart, Randy Wood, Paul Archer, Randy Maud, Barry Voight, Eric Von Lunen, Steve Mellon. Credit: Barry Voight

Field Camp 1975

Students
In 1975 the Geological Sciences Major included options in Geophysics, Geochemistry-Mineralogy-Petrology, and Geology.  Geology and G-M-P required Geol 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic terms and summer Geol 472, Field Geology.  A pre-camp cross-country excursion was available as Geol 471.  Most of these names are from the database of 1976 Geological Sciences alumni that, hopefully, is a proxy for 1975 field camp, although some may have attended a year earlier or a year later.  Some of these alumni, in addition, may have been geophysics option, so would not have attended field camp.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Frederick J Allen  
Carl J Carlson  
Paul L Archer  
Joseph M Babinetz  
William K Behrens  
Capt. Frederick Y Borden, III  
Charles M Boyer, II  
Scott  B Cline  
Alan S Cuddy  
Robert K Dickson  
James A (Jim) Ewart, Jr. (MS85)  
Barry L Fisher  
Robert R Fullerton, Jr.  
Wayne E Gerberick  
Michael Homiak  
Gay A Howell Deamer  
Jerry L Kuzior  
David M Jenkins  
Jane E Jenness (XC only)  
B Keith Kaneda  
Leona C Kobus  
Randall L (Randy) Maud  
Steven A (Steve) Mellon  
M Craig Miller  
Mark A Miller  
Robert D Muzzi, Jr.  
Wayne M Narr  
Joan M (Schweinsberger) Richarde  
David R Robinson  
Randolph W (Randy) Scott  
Joseph M Tarantino  
Eric Von Lunen  
Catherine M Woehr  
Randy M Wood  
Ramona Weakland  

 

Faculty
   Charles Thornton (cross-country volcanology trip), Duff Gold, Deane Smith, Barry Voight, Derrill Kerrick

TA
   Barry Scheetz

Where They Stayed
   YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana and Northwest Community College, Powell, Wyoming (group split); U of U (for the Alta metamorphics project)

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Beartooth front, Stillwater, Heart Mountain detachment, group then split between Teton Wilderness in Wyoming and Alta metamorphics in Utah. 

From the YBRA Annual Meeting Minutes, courtesy of Russ & Linda Dutcher: "31 students expected with 33 expected next year."

Field Camp 1975
Jim Ewart's tale of the Teton Wilderness Area Project

Jim Ewart - Field Camp 1975Jim Ewart in February 2006 writes about the Teton Wilderness trip, sometimes referred to as the "death march":

     "After a time mapping White Mountain, the majority of the camp went with Derrill Kerrick to what I heard were pretty cushy digs at a campus near Alta for more mapping of metamorphic rocks. The remaining twelve of us marched off into the Teton Wilderness Area [which lies east of the park] with Barry, making the group number a lucky thirteen. However, we didn't learn where we were going or how we were to get there until the evening before we set off; Barry told us only to buy 11 days worth of nonperishable food in Jackson Hole earlier in the day. Of course, this also meant that we didn't know what was to happen until after the vans had left with the others. (The sole of one of my boots had detached by this point so I also decided to buy a new pair of boots while in town.)

     I was with Barry when he picked up some mail in Jackson Hole. He seemed particularly irritated with a letter from Wayne Burnham and then declared that the Department Chairman had doubled the liability insurance when he heard where we were going and how we were to get there.

     Before describing the trip I should say that Barry had enlisted our group prior to the start of field camp and had warned us that his session would involve extended backpacking and would be physically demanding. So we knew about that and had appropriate gear. Well... most of us did... one fellow had a boy scout pack with an external frame that was not kind to his back.

     The first morning we drove to a lodge [Togwotee Lodge] and descended a rather long trail down to a tributary of the Snake River [the Buffalo Fork]. In the course of the trip we would cross the continental divide and the headwaters of the Yellowstone River. The entire trip involved hiking approximately 100 miles. Barry had outlined the trip with us on the map as we set off. He had pointed out the locations of two ranger stations and what was to be done if someone or, particularly, if Barry was injured during the course of the trip. A second, backup map was given to one of the more experienced of us (not me) should Barry's copy get lost. At one point on the descent, Barry decided that the switchbacks were taking too long so we took an off-trail "short cut". I recall this involved scrambling over a lot of blow-down and much cussing.

     We finally rejoined the trail and proceeded up-river through a very dry bottom dotted with sagebrush and not much overhead cover. The dry soil, churned by the passage of packhorses, rose in puffs of dust as we trudged along in the hot sun. We were already tired from the off trail adventure, though it wasn't yet noon. I was dragging at the back of the line, which was to become my station for the entire journey because my feet were blistering. It was then that I noticed an odd looking, amorphous cloud wafting toward me through the line of hikers. The cloud turned out to be mosquitoes, and they were very hungry. I recall wiping my arms and leaving behind disturbing amounts of blood -- as much from the marchers in front as from me. The mosquitoes became our constant companions, leaving us only once that I recall; that would be late in afternoon of the following day while we crossed the divide in a hail of water and ice.

     The first night, though, was very pleasant and a welcome relief for all of us. We camped in woods at the edge of a meadow being used by some horse packers. We had a nice fire going and were enjoying some of the more perishable (and heavier) food. At one point we heard a rustling in the darkness beyond the edge of our vision. We could make out the shape of a large beast moving about and assumed one of the packers' horses had gotten loose of its hobble. Our mistake became obvious when the head of a moose loomed out of the darkness, peering at us. Its curiosity satisfied, the moose disappeared into the night and that was the last we saw of it.

     The next morning my feet seemed to have swollen. They no longer fit very well in my boots, which were still size 9.5, though soggy (and cold) from having trudged several times across the stream the previous day. The morning of the second day was uneventful. I was having difficulty keeping up, but found that I could manage if I didn't stop walking when the others took rest breaks. This became my routine for the rest of the trip. It began to cloud and rain softly after lunch. As we began our ascent of the switchbacks toward the Continental Divide at Two Oceans Pass, Barry told everyone to have warm clothes, and such rain gear as we had, ready and to not delay in putting them on if the weather took a bad turn. This was good advice, because the rain steadily increased in intensity and changed to sleet and then hail as we approached and crossed the 10,000+ foot-high divide. I should mention that the trails, unlike eastern trails, were relatively easy, having been designed for pack trains. That is, except for the fords.

     We came to the most difficult of the fords as night descended on the Yellowstone side of the divide. In the dark we faced the Yellowstone, swollen by the summer melt to over-waist depth. By the time I got there, a rope had been strung from a tree on the far bank to one fellow anchoring it on my side. Most of the guys were already on the far bank and a couple were stationed in the river helping the stragglers across. Most of us had only one change of clothes, so we stripped to our skivvies in the vain hope of keeping something dry and waded into the river. The packs we removed and handed overhead in monkey-brigade fashion, to avoid having them partially submerged by the rushing water. We had worked out the scheme of using a rope for support in a previous deep ford; this tactic proved a key factor in none of us going for a night swim in that cold water. We camped at the nearest reasonable spot, which was in sight of the place we had forded. Before long a fire was going and nearby trees were festooned with ropes from which were hung thirteen pairs of socks, pants, shirts, and various undergarments. It was a cold, wet night, but we were all relieved that the day had ended and no one was otherwise much the worse for it.

     The next day was great -- more or less flat walking downstream along the Yellowstone to the area we where we would camp for three days to do some geology. The sun came out and along the way we were treated to glorious views of a giant glacial valley and its hanging water falls. We stopped hiking early to camp near a cobble-strewn bank of the river. Barry passed out some extra fishing gear and we all went fishing for a few hours. Enough were caught to feed us all. That evening we treated ourselves to golden trout fried in a cast iron pan one of the horse packers had left hanging on a tree. Sitting on the bank watching the moonlit Yellowstone wash by, while eating that fish, is one of my fondest memories of the trip.

     Soon after the fish was consumed, we began to notice an odd metallic sound coming from the brush just outside of camp. After a brief hunt for the source of the sound we discovered Bob (the experienced one) huddled around something he obviously wanted to keep to himself. It was a metal bowl in which he had been stirring with his metal spoon this glop that turned out to be instant pudding (Jello green pistachio instant pudding). Bob was convinced to share some of his delicacy with us and it was generally agreed that it was the best desert we had ever tasted. Bob, it seems, had devoted a surprising portion of his precious pack space to this wonderful stuff. (I don't know about the others, but for many years thereafter I never failed to take Jello instant pudding, and always some pistachio, on camping trips.)

     Over the next three days we engaged mapping exercises that consisted mostly of measuring volcanic sections. Barry indicated to us that this area was being mapped by a friend of his from the USGS, Bob Crandall. However, Bob accessed the area by helicopter and couldn't spend much time on the ground. So, Barry assured us that our work would contribute greatly to this effort. I'm not sure our work was as useful as Barry suggested it might be, but it sounded like a reasonable excuse for the effort expended in reaching the place.

     One morning during our stay in the area we heard a bellow coming from the vicinity of Barry's tent: "An A in the course for anyone who has prunes." Wayne Narr and I searched our packs, because we knew that we had something like prunes. They were figs, which I dutifully presented to Barry. (A couple of months later I learned that both Wayne and I got an A for field camp, though I'm certain it had nothing to do with the figs.) The figs had been one of the brighter food selections Wayne and I had made for the trip. Most of the guys had scrounged what they could from the markets in Jackson Hole, because we couldn't afford the freeze-dried goodies that were available at the camping supply places. One of the less successful selections we made was this stuff that had recently hit the market - hamburger helper. Neither of us knew what it was, but it was obviously dry (therefore light) and from its name we figured it must be something like hamburger. We discovered that while it is possible to boil hamburger helper into some kind of porridge, its taste leaves something to be desired in the absence of hamburger.

     The march back out of the Teton Wilderness was less eventful. We accomplished it in one less day, though. The last day was a forced march of about 25 miles. I recall that we were making good time and at one point Barry offered us the option of pushing for the trailhead or camping through the evening. Everyone, except me, voted to push on. I didn't want to because my feet were slowing me down. Well, the vote decided it and we forged ahead. Barry asked Bob to lag behind with me to make sure that I made it. As it turned out we arrived at the valley of the mosquitoes well before dinnertime. Barry was waiting there with a few of the others so we could end the journey together. The mosquitoes were still biting, but by this time we didn't pay much attention. They had ceased raising welts.

     We made it back to the lodge around four or five in the afternoon. There was a bar in the lodge and Barry took us right in and bought a round of beer for us all. No one at the bar seemed to take undo notice of us, though I'm not sure why. It must have looked (and smelled) like a scene out of Gunsmoke as the cowhands were coming to town. During the journey we had washed, sort of, but not with much conviction, and most of us were wearing clothes that had been changed perhaps once in the past week. I don't remember the brand of the beer, but I am certain it was the best tasting I have ever encountered. While we enjoyed the beer, Barry convinced the owner to open up the kitchen early for dinner. We all sat down to a full meal and then repaired to a dormitory setup in the attic of the place to wash and take a nap. After sleeping for about an hour or two every one of us went back to the dinning room and ate a second full meal. I think that second chicken fried steak was just as good as the first one. The second pie was pretty good too.

     In retrospect, I don't think any of us that made the trip thought of it as the 'death march.'  That was a term coined by others. It has been 30 years since that summer of 1975, and it was an adventure I well remember."

[addendum after reading Steve's piece] Scree skiing! I heartily joined in that bit of fun, which was probably why the soles of my boots were flapping in the breeze not long after White Mountain. I think it was Randy Woods who helped me get some mule skin on my feet during lunch that first day of the march. We hadn't stopped moving long enough to do it before then. By that time, though, the blisters had risen. So we cut donut holes in the patches of mule skin, which helped a little. My feet were toughened from field camp, but no match for the stiff leather of those logger's boots -- not one of the wiser purchases I've made.

Steve's story reminded me of a few things I'd forgotten, like the grizzly bear and the powdered tequila (I think I got a taste of the stuff the night of the trout fry. Thanks Steve).

Like Steve, I had a few after-field camp adventures. I went back to White Mountain to help Charlie Faust (then with the USGS) and his partner Daffodil (a dog, whom Charlie referred to as Dafferdowndilly) with his mapping of that area. Late one afternoon, we left White Mountain and went to Cathedral Cliffs to collect some basalt samples from the Heart Mtn. Slide detachment zone. Charlie (who was more intelligent than I) stayed at the car after directing me to climb up through a breach in the 50 ft+ high lower escarpment. Above this was a slope of tuff that led up to the detachment zone. I got up there well enough and got my prize, but on the way back across the slope the thin cover of pebble-sized scree slipped from beneath my feet. I quickly found myself sliding down the slope toward the cliff of basalt columns below. I splayed my arms and legs, but this only slowed my slide enough to give me time to think about it. I realized that I was either going to stop this or it would likely be the end of me. Fortunately, I still had my rock hammer in my hand and was able to stop the slide by digging its spade end into the soft rock with as much force as I could muster. Once I got my self seated upright and turned around, I was rewarded with the most spectacular and beautiful sight I think I've ever had. The sun was low in the sky and was shedding a gorgeous golden light over the valley and the scattered patches of cloud that had moved in below me. The clouds cast dark shadows and were shedding rain and lightning on the ground beneath. It was dark by the time I got back to the car and met Charlie and his dog. I don't recall what happened to that rock.

Field Camp 1975
Steve Mellon's thoughts on the Teton Wilderness trip and his succeeding career

Steve Mellon - Field Camp 1975I was on the death march. We mapped the Wapati Formation, as I remember it. Actually, I would not refer to it as a "death march." I rather enjoyed it and have done a similar hike many times since. I thought we had a nice tight team, got some mapping done, and everyone made it back safe and sound! It is a very pleasurable memory and something I will never forget!

Tell Barry I said Hi! Ask him about tequila behind the rocks! He thought I was crazy for packing it in and the empty out--oh yeah we told everyone it was powdered tequila!

The fella with the boy scout back pack in Jim’s description went with me after the 10-day trip to work at Johns Manville, the Stillwater company, at Brass Monkey Camp. He left Brass Monkey before I did. I stayed until I had to go back to make the fall classes. Another field camp member, Randy Scott, worked on a sampling crew with me. And Bob Fullerton made four field campers working at Brass Monkey.

I remember all the events Jim describes, and I enjoyed it all. The horse thing was on the trail, and Randy Wood, my tent partner, and I could tell they were following us. They came right at us, and we jumped 40 feet when they broke onto the trail. I was more in the middle to front of the line as I remember it.

Randy and I in one photo are clowning around on a log we had to walk over a creek (big, cold and fast-moving). Yeah we were wet, and my tent partner twisted his ankle on the first day, but we stayed up with the pack. Jim must have been without mule skin?? I remember the fish fry and I remember mapping and looking from a ridge during lunch (PB&J) down on a thick huckleberry patch -- and then the berries moved! A grizzly bear! We ended lunch, moved down a scree slope and back to camp early!

Randy Wood was also the main guy who ran down scree slopes on White Mountain [on the Heart Mountain project] at the end of each day. He never fell, and we called it scree skiing. See who remembers that deal! I remember crossing the Yellowstone; one guy slipped and almost lost his pack. I remember that two folks were staged downstream to grab any packs or folks. I remember sponge baths in creeks and the river that were very cold; we splashed, lathered up and jumped back in. Rough duty, but we had fun too!

Does anyone remember asking Barry what the large hunks of meat were on the sharpened pine limbs? After we were in more than a day, we saw 5-6 of them along our trail. Barry says -- Bear traps to keep bears in here because they put the distempered bears from Yellowstone here. Course he was testing our metal!

What a team we were after that trip. In 1975 we worked hard, played hard, and had the experience of a lifetime! I think it prepared me for life as a field geologist, that and my opportunity to work at Stillwater. One opportunity lead to another etc. Not sure you know the Stillwater story... Duff offered everyone an opportunity to go to Stillwater after field camp. Only three accepted. Everyone wanted to get back to finish out the summer before it was over. Some of us were in love with the mountains, however, and saw an opportunity beyond comparison -- a chance to do geology, walk in the mountains every day, get paid, and fed all you could eat. I think I lasted the longest and really did not want to leave. I could tell you many stories that happened while I was at Brass Monkey Camp! Pink snow, stranded OVN by chopper, folks almost cut by chopper blades for dumb moves, down drafts and see you in AM, walking blasting caps off the skid of the chopper onto shear rock ledge, tying the 3rd cap on, blasting outcrop, fishing in isolated ponds, off days-camp parties, etc. I got to do a lot of neat projects -- adit mapping (Fog Pond), adit sampling, winky drilling and core logging, outcrop mapping and sample blasting.

This experience led to my next opportunity with Phelps Dodge as an exploration geologist. My curriculum at PSU and field camp/Stillwater experience impressed PD, so I advanced ahead of folks with MS degrees. I impressed them with my interpretation and classification of saprolite in the Piedmont. I could actually see through sap and classify rock type etc. which had a 90% hit ratio when petro reports came back. Duff and Charlie Thornton had lot to do with this! That then got me into grad school [South Dakota School of Mines] even though I was a "marginal" student.

In grad school I had a paid mapping thesis, with Union Carbide, on a skarn. I had lots of money for geochem, petro, maps, printing, photos, etc. Union Carbide wanted a deposit, and I wanted a thesis.

Then that lead to AMAX and exploration work. I worked for them at 3 mines for another 6 years. Then the industry took a downturn, and I switched to environmental work, building tailings and construction dams.  Then in 1994/5 I permitted the only stand-alone in-situ copper mine operational in both the US and the world, to this point, for BHP (Magma Copper). We permitted what was said not to be do-able! I think Barry's determination and rock mechanics courses had something to do with that.

Without Field Camp, Barry's toughening course, and Duff's opportunity for me to work at Stillwater, I would definitely have been behind the eight ball. Duff and Barry opened doors that would have been closed for me!

PS.. the rigorous curriculum at PSU paid off many times over... make folks take the calculus, physics, and chem load that we had to take in the 1970's – it really helped me in grad school and in industry!

Additional remarks by Barry Voight on the 1975 trip

Barry Voight - Field Camp 1975These guys have great memories and/or really good field notebooks. I remember pretty much all of it, including the tinny sounds in the bushes that turned into a pistachio-coated spoon and the challenging Yellowstone fording. Pistachio thus became a regular import into the Iceland project in late 1970s-1980s. The take-off and return spot for the trek was Togwotee Lodge, on the road heading east from Jackson Hole. The trout were cutthroats. Like Jim, I remember our first tall beer in the Lodge, at the end of that long dusty and sweaty day, as the best I ever had.

     Incidentally the drinking age in Wyoming was 17. Otherwise of course, these lads could not have had alcoholic beverages. Or Steve's magic powder, the freeze-dried cactus fluff destined to make a million for the inventor. Or be ready for enlistment at Parris Island.

     I'm guessing I didn't teach the full field camp that year, but came out to take over from Duff to do the last 3 weeks or so, i.e. Heart Mountain area project (White Mtn etc), and then lead the whole group through Yellowstone, Hebgen earthquake area, then Jackson Hole, before splitting and wrapping it up with our little trek.

     On this trip (or another a year or so before?) the PSU group was joined by Bart Jenks and his wife. Bart taught Mech Eng at PSU and was on crutches or wheelchair because of polio as a kid, but they were doing a camping trip through the west and were with us at White Mtn, Jackson Hole too, when we split up. Impressive to see him get around in the field; inspiring really. Bart worked with me on a mechanical model of the Heart Mtn movement.

Joan Schweinsberger Richarde on the 1975 Alta Experience and a Volcanology Field Trip

Joan Richarde - Field Camp 1975I just found the wonderful archive of Field Camp memories....  Thank you for your work on it!  I was one of the students in Summer of 1975.  The 1974 field camp group had the second part of field camp in Dillon, Montana (after YBRA, Red Lodge) but I think there was a scheduling conflict at Dillon, so Derrill Kerrick & Barry Voight made other plans.  For our field camp, we split into two groups after Red Lodge.  The group pictured for 1975 chose the Teton Wilderness experience with Dr. Voight.  The other group, including myself, drove to Salt Lake City with Dr. Kerrick, to be the first PSU field camp to study the contact metamorphism up at Alta.  Once I knew what we'd be studying up at Alta, there was no question which option I'd take!  For me Alta was the perfect culmination of field camp... studying everything I loved most -- igneous & metamorphic petrology.  It was the perfect textbook example of the P-T changes in mineralogy through the sediment layers that the intrusion intersected.

That same year, Dr. C.P. Thornton gave a graduate course in Volcanology (Spring 1975), followed by a special field trip looking at igneous & volcanic features in Colorado, Arizona, Southern Utah, Death Valley, & New Mexico. That trip was the most fun & exciting learning experience of my education at Penn State.  Only 2 undergrads were admitted to the class and field trip.  They were Bob Dickson & myself, Joan Schweinsberger.  Because the end of the trip with Dr. Thornton was after the Field Camp group was already on the cross-country trip, Bob & I were dropped off in Kansas City to take a bus up to Minnesota (Duluth I think), to join the Field Camp group enroute. 

Looking at the years of pictures at YBRA brought back so many memories.  I thought we had taken a photo of the whole group on the porch just like the 1991 picture, but perhaps it got lost along the way.  Again thanks for the archive!

In my professional life, I go by the name Joan Richarde since 1984.  I moved to Missoula, Montana in '82, having fallen in love with the West on those two field trips late spring & summer 1975.  I'd love to have my email address added to the
list for Field Camp 1975.  If another Red Lodge reunion is ever planned, please let me know...

All the best,
Joan Richarde
Montana Public Radio, www.mtpr.org

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the pictures: (thanks to Steve Mellon, Barry Voight, Wayne Narr, Gay Deamer, and Duff Gold for the images)

 

Alumni Field Camp 1975 Photos
       
DuPage IL landfill
DuPage IL landfill
Scott Cline is on the higher step
Randy Maud, Bob Fullerton, and Jerry Kuzior
front: ?, Randy Wood, Steve, Ramona, Joe Tarentino
Bob Fullerton in the center
Ramona and Barry Voight in the center, Joan next to yellow shirt, Carl Carlson on the right
Minnesota
Homestake Mine  Steve Mellon at left, Carl Carlson in grey hat at lower left
Mt Rushmore  Steve, Craig Miller, Jerry Kuzior, Mike Homiak, Carl Carlson, Jim Ewart(?)
Mt Rushmore  Steve, Randy Wood, Ramona, Gay, Joan, Jim Ewart
Wind River Canyon
Big Horn Mtns
Jerry Kuzior or Wayne Narr on the left
Bighorn Basin road trip, Randy W
Craig Miller, Bighorn Basin
Wind River Canyon
In the Hebgen Lake quake the boulder at lower right smashed the outhouse.
Randy Scott in the yellow cap, Bob Fullerton facing the camera
Snowball fight, Beartooth Plateau
Snowball fight, Beartooth Plateau "zebra rock" at the Stillwater complex  Barry Scheetz at left, Duff Gold in blue shirt, Wayne Narr behind Duff, Bob Dickson below Duff, Steve and Mike Homiak to the right of Bob, Randy Scott at top right with yellow cap, Joe Babinetz shirtless with a hammer, Randy Wood in the back using his hand lens, Deane Smith in right background Steve Mellon and Mike Homiak at the Stillwater Starting the wilderness hike
setting out on the Teton Wilderness trip Teton wilderness hike Carl & Jim waiting to cross on a log Jim falling off log, after crossing the stream. Steve and Randy M on bank
Eric crossing snowfields Teton trip. Steve, ?, Eric near the continental divide At the continental divide. Randy M, Randy W, Eric, Carl
halfway on the Teton trip, Continental Divide Group at the continental divide At the continental divide Crossing a snowfield
Jim Ewart behind in the snow rest stop Short rest Randy Wood and Steve crossing stream on a log
Weathering the storm Drying out, Steve & Randy W wet camp on the Wilderness trip Group at the Yellowstone River
preparing for a ford crossing the Yellowstone River, Wilderness trip fording the Yellowstone fording the river
fording the Yellowstone fording the Yellowstone Jim Ewart fording the river fording the Yellowstone
Steve Mellon crossing the Yellowstone Randy Wood Barry Voight in camp
Bob Dickson in camp Jerry Kuzior in camp Eric von Lunen in camp Jim Ewart in camp
Mike Homiak in camp Paul Archer in camp Ralph(?)  in camp Rick in camp
Steve (Sam) in camp Carl Carson in camp Randy Wood in camp Barry Voight in camp
Paul Archer & Barry Camp scene Mike cleaning up The one that got away
A watched pot never boils cutthroat trout dinner Steve after the Wilderness trip Camp
after the Teton trip Same picture, different shadows after the Teton trip

 

 

 

 

 Field Camp 1976. Group in the Badlands.

Group in the Badlands. Gene Williams in middle, blue shirt.  Jane Jenness in red shirt & red backpack.

Field Camp 1976

Students
In 1976 the Geological Sciences Major included options in Geophysics, Geochemistry-Mineralogy, and Geology.  Geology and G&M required Geol 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic terms and summer Geol 472, Field Geology.  A pre-camp cross-country excursion was available as GSc 471.  Most of these names are from the database of 1977 Geological Sciences alumni that, hopefully, is a proxy for 1976 field camp, although some may have attended a year earlier or a year later.  Some of these alumni, in addition, may have been geophysics option, so would not have attended field camp.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
James P Ackerman  
James H (Jim) Anspach  
Mildred Schlain Barylski  
Charles M Bowers  
George N Breit  
Michael P Brose  
Robert M Carland  
Kenneth Carter  
Robert M Carland  
Colm Chomicky  
Neil F Cooper  
Alan T Costello  
Richard H Craft  
Ronald M Cupich  
David M Demshur  
Donald L Dietz  
Dennis P Dunn  
Randy S Ewasko  
Kenneth S Fantone  
Edward J Fry  
Donald S Greenfield, Jr.  
Peter W Hartshorn  
Douglas R Hartzell  
Stephen J Harvan  
Keith D Hatch  
Glen W Hendry  
Janet S Herman (PhD 82)  
William S Hoffman  
Anne P Hynes  
Jane E Jenness  
Kevin T Johnson  
William F Kardosh  
Orrin Leshner  
W Gregory Love  
Richard M Medziuch  
Gayle R Miller  
Susan M Narbut  
Robert R Oliver  
A Michael Pelletier  
Eugene W Pine  
Christopher R Ralph  
Carole Rock  
Richard L Simon  
Jeffrey A Sitler  
Christiaan F Staargaard  
Kathleen Anderson Stager  
William (Bill) Stefan  
Robert J Strecker  
Charles J (Charlie) Tapper  
Bradley W Thomas  
Leonard C Weltman  

 

Faculty
  
Duff Gold, Derrill Kerrick, Gene Williams, Rob Scholten, Hiroshi Ohmoto

TAs
  

Where They Stayed
   YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana and Northwest Community College, Powell, Wyoming (group split); U of U, Salt Lake City

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Beartooth Front, Stillwater, Rosebud, Alta overthrust, Alta stock, Alta skarns

Some recollections of Neil Cooper about the 1976 camp

The 1976 field camp was my last hurrah before graduation in August of 76.  One of my memories is of getting a speeding ticket in Red Lodge (I was one of the official drivers) with a van full of slightly inebriated (never) geology students.  I paid the Montana State Trooper on the spot. 

My very best memory is of going down in a lead-zinc mine outside Park City, Utah with Dr. Ohmoto.  We signed the visitors log and were given an embossed brass tag to put in our coveralls. It matched the number near our signature.  When we asked what this was for, we were told, "in case your body is burned beyond recognition".  That was a great tour!!!

Professor Gene Williams on Field Camps in Utah in the 1970s

You asked me to give you some thoughts about my experiences at our Geology Summer Camp held in Alta, Utah, Gene Williamswhere I was an instructor for several years in the mid 1970s.  It is a sobering thought to know that our students there, so young and vibrant, apprehensive at being in the field for the first time in such forbidding terranes, are now well into their professional careers.  I cannot remember all their faces or their names, but I can still see them, with their packs and picks, boarding the vans in the morning in the parking lot of the Alta Peruvian Lodge for the trip down Little Cottonwood Canyon to the field area along the Watch Front above Salt Lake City.  For them, as well as for their teachers, the moment of truth has finally arrived.  For after years of sitting in classroom and laboratory, the student finally gets to face the rocks alone, and will find out how well he or she was instructed and has learned, and whether or not he or she has the capacity to apply such knowledge -- in effect, if he or she has the makings of a geologist.  I would hope that experience at Alta provided a solid base for future progress, because the geology of that area was most inspiring and wide-ranging.  I have no way of knowing how well they fared, for I have heard from very few.

     Now I see, between the partings in the dark clouds of the past, high on the Wasatch Front, small clusters of our students in the process of making their maps.  When I approach one of the parties, after much climbing, one of its members comes forward to meet me.  He is their leader, not because a vote was taken, but probably because he just took charge naturally.  He is not necessarily the brightest or the most aggressive, but somehow had the ability to command, just the way leaders emerged when I was in the military.  He had to report the progress of the work, answer my questions, and hear any criticism I might offer.  Dividing the students into field parties, although necessary, made it difficult to evaluate the final reports submitted by each student, because so much of the work was a joint effort.  I don't think we ever solved this difficulty in grading the final reports.

     Peering once again through the mists of the past, I see myself in the basement of the Alta Peruvian Lodge, making drawings on large sheets of brown wrapping paper.  Ah!!  Now it's all coming back.... I am transcribing my field notes and diagrams to be put on exhibit that evening.  They represent the results of observations I had made when I was out visiting the field parties.  It demonstrated to the students the kind of observations an experience field geologist would make, and thus set a kind of standard for the next day's work.  In effect, the diagrams said, this is what you should have seen today so that you may see more tomorrow.  I tried to do this for all the parties I visited so no one party had the advantage.

     The clouds part once again, and I see a small, balding man in the process of giving a lecture in the dining room of Gene Williamsthe Alta Peruvian.  The subject is a report of the U.S. Geological Survey entitled "Lake Bonneville" by G K Gilbert.  The lecturer is Dr. Larry Lattman, a Professor of Geomorphology at Penn State, and the subject the history of a Pleistocene lake which once occupied a much larger area surrounding the present Great Salt Lake.  The next day we will travel to the valley to examine the evidence.  For the history of the lake presented by Gilbert is one of the great classical papers in American geology.  In addition to providing the student with relevant technical aspects of a subject, it would be desirable if one could illustrate, by example, something which would represent the best of its kind as a way of providing inspiration.  Thus the students heard one of the most brilliant lecturers in geology speaking about one of America's greatest geologists and how he worked out the history of Lake Bonneville.  It is not necessary that everybody be good, but that there be an example of it somewhere.  That was a day, some forty years ago, near Salt Lake City, Utah, where that excellence was both seen and heard.  This was a rare treat, not only for the students but for all the faculty as well.

Left: Gene Williams examining the Wasatch Fault

     During my thirty years on the faculty at Penn State, I participated, in varying degrees, in Penn State Geology Field Camps.  They all had something to offer, but I felt that Alta was the most exciting, not only for excellence of exposure and varietie of problems and history, but also because few, if any, of the faculty were familiar with the geology of the region.  So we had to learn along with the students.  If effect, we had to teach by example.  Standing at the outcrop, facing students and colleagues, one had to "speak plain French."  If one could not, they would find you out, and you would lose your influence, to be taken over by another.  So there were natural leaders among faculty, just as there were among students.  It was for the director of the camp to find this out and to use the staff accordingly.  The camp director at Alta, Derrill Kerrick, was excellent in this regard.

     And now, one final thought.  Living in such close quarters with students and colleagues, one quickly learns about their personal and professional strengths and weaknesses, as well as your own, which is probably more important.  I will give just one example.  Sometime, during my stay at Alta, the camp was visited by Wayne Burnham, the Geoscience Department Head.  I was surprised to see him, because I felt that he did not have a high regard for field geology, inasmuch as his field was experimental geochemistry.  Well, I was wrong, very wrong.  The next day, I was even more surprised when he visited us in the field.  I was in the process of visiting one of the field parties mapping faulted alluvial fans high along the front of the Wasatch Range when I saw, far down the valley, a figure climbing up toward us.  As he approached, I saw that it was Wayne, huffing and puffing and obviously not in the best of shape.  He said to continue on with what we were doing; he would just observe.  But after a short while he asked a few pertinent questions and made some critical observations.  He had traveled some thousands of miles not just to review our efforts at the camp but to participate and to contribute.  Now, I'm really surprised and embarrassed because I realized that in all the years I had known Wayne, I had judged him to be a narrow specialist, and here he was talking about tectonics and sedimentation, my two specialties.  For years you can pass your colleagues in the hall or see them in the conference room and really know little about them, a condition that can be corrected by a few days in the field.  If I were a chair of a geology department, I think I might require all members to teach Summer Camp at least once, if only for getting them to know and appreciate their colleagues.

     Although the lengthening years now cast longer shadows on my memories of our summer camp at Alta, I feel that what I have related here is, for the most part, accurate and will remain one of the most pleasing periods of my teaching career, made possible by willing and able students, even though I cannot recall them all individually.  It was, indeed, "a time to remember."

                                                                ---- Gene

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images:

 

Alumni Field Camp 1976 Photos
       
Minnesota lava flow near Lake Superior
Thunderbird Mine, Minnesota
Homestake Mine, South Dakota
Mike Harvan feeds gophers at Devils Tower
Boysen Dam, Wyoming
Snowball fight in the Bighorns
Beartooth highway
Centennial Basin, Montana
Dupage County, IL landfill Barbican, Wisconsin Barbican, Wisconsin Thompson Beach, Lake Superior

 

 

 

 

 

Field Camp 1977
Field camp group in Albion Basin. Lee DiStefano with dark hair, no shirt, front center-left; Mark Pawlewicz in the orange hat; Jay W Jones IV green shirt with white trim on the right (thanks to Pierre Zippi & Mark Pawlewicz for the IDs)

Field Camp 1977

Students
In 1977 the Geological Sciences Major included options in Geophysics, Geochemistry-Mineralogy, and Geology.  Geology and G&M required GSc 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic terms and summer GSc 472, Field Geology.  A pre-camp cross-country excursion was available as GSc 471.  Most of these names are from the database of 1978 Geosciences alumni that, hopefully, is a proxy for 1977 field camp, although some may have attended a year earlier or a year later.  Some of these alumni, in addition, may have been geophysics option, so would not have attended field camp.  Thanks to Pierre Zippi and Mark Pawlewicz for additional names.

    

Attendee List
Name Contact
Kevin J Breen (MS 82)  
Robert G Brewer  
Vincent P Caggia, Jr.  
Lee DiStefano  
Steven B Easton  
William R Gerber  
Philip S Getty  
Joel R Greer  
Laurie A Gregory-Frost  
Keith C Hackley  
Karen Merz Jacobson  
Jay W Jones IV  
Dennis J Maiorino  
James S Marshall  
Michael L McCarthy  
Richard J McKeever  
Joseph T McNally  
Bradley J Meese  
John S Mellow  
Christopher P Misitano  
Beth A Moore  
Michael P Morgan  
Mark J Pawlewicz  
Lawrence J Pekot  
Frank N Repplier  
Carol Lukoff Schrenkel  
Donald E Schroder  
Larry E Shanabrook  
Robert B Sidlowe  
Mark A Smolley  
Joseph D (Joe) Taglieri  
Edward W Tomko  
Michael N Veloski  
Mark G Wallace  
James L Warren  
Mark E Weis  
Thomas R Wood  
Pierre A Zippi  

 

Faculty
   Deane Smith (cross-country),
Duff Gold, Derrill Kerrick, Gene Williams, Rob Scholten

TAs
  

Where They Stayed (thanks to Mark Weis and Pierre Zippi)
   Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah

Major Projects
   Wasatch Front Quaternary geology, Alta overthrust, Alta stock, Alta skarns

 

Stories from Pierre Zippi about Penn State Field Camp 1977

There are some classic stories from '77. One, on the way out, where we (Mark Pawlewicz was the driver) forgot a guy (nice quiet guy) in some dusty little town after a shopping (drinking?) trip. We drove back to the camp. The next morning someone noticed he was missing. We drove back to town that morning and found him sleeping on a bench in front of a closed store. He was really mad, but he told a hilarious story about trying to stay warm with a mangy little stray dog -- the only other living thing in town that night. Contact Pawlewicz; he can tell the story better and probably remembers the forgotten one's name.

Schroder came within an inch of a horrible death after he set loose a landslide of boulders and scree (after we were repeatedly told to keep off the slope).  He was chased down the slope by a boulder three times his size.  Every time the oblong boulder made a revolution, it would catch him in the back of the legs, looking like it was going to pull him under. We took him to a regional hospital in (Eau Claire?) Wisconsin where he was stitched-up.

I have a few other stories, but they are probably not suitable for the website. One about....

Additional Comments by Mark Pawlewicz about Penn State Field Camp 1977

Pierre's story -- he remembers well but missed a small detail.  The missing camper was Joe Taglieri.  He helped me with
driving that year; we did the cross country trip also.  The missed connection was in the Black Hills.  We had gone in town to see Rushmore.  Joe wanted to get a shower, or maybe it was both a shower and laundry.  We would have been happy for either.  He was my partner on the first exercise, mapping the Wasatch front.
  I did indeed forget to pick him up, but then no one else noticed he was missing!  His story about the evening on a bench was quite funny -- it was in the telling.  He had the whole town to himself.

In your group picture at Albion basin, that is me in the orange hat and no shirt.  In the parking lot group photo, Frank Repplier sits on the far left and Kim Thomas (only on cross country trip) is sitting on the blacktop several people to the right.  Deane Smith (in the khakis) is on the far right.  He was only in camp on the cross country portion.  He loved the pegmatites in the Black Hills!

 

 

Professor Gene Williams on Field Camps in Utah in the 1970s

You asked me to give you some thoughts about my experiences at our Geology Summer Camp held in Alta, Utah, Professor Gene Williams - Field Camp 1977where I was an instructor for several years in the mid 1970s.  It is a sobering thought to know that our students there, so young and vibrant, apprehensive at being in the field for the first time in such forbidding terranes, are now well into their professional careers.  I cannot remember all their faces or their names, but I can still see them, with their packs and picks, boarding the vans in the morning in the parking lot of the Alta Peruvian Lodge for the trip down Little Cottonwood Canyon to the field area along the Watch Front above Salt Lake City.  For them, as well as for their teachers, the moment of truth has finally arrived.  For after years of sitting in classroom and laboratory, the student finally gets to face the rocks alone, and will find out how well he or she was instructed and has learned, and whether or not he or she has the capacity to apply such knowledge -- in effect, if he or she has the makings of a geologist.  I would hope that experience at Alta provided a solid base for future progress, because the geology of that area was most inspiring and wide-ranging.  I have no way of knowing how well they fared, for I have heard from very few.

     Now I see, between the partings in the dark clouds of the past, high on the Wasatch Front, small clusters of our students in the process of making their maps.  When I approach one of the parties, after much climbing, one of its members comes forward to meet me.  He is their leader, not because a vote was taken, but probably because he just took charge naturally.  He is not necessarily the brightest or the most aggressive, but somehow had the ability to command, just the way leaders emerged when I was in the military.  He had to report the progress of the work, answer my questions, and hear any criticism I might offer.  Dividing the students into field parties, although necessary, made it difficult to evaluate the final reports submitted by each student, because so much of the work was a joint effort.  I don't think we ever solved this difficulty in grading the final reports.

     Peering once again through the mists of the past, I see myself in the basement of the Alta Peruvian Lodge, making drawings on large sheets of brown wrapping paper.  Ah!!  Now it's all coming back.... I am transcribing my field notes and diagrams to be put on exhibit that evening.  They represent the results of observations I had made when I was out visiting the field parties.  It demonstrated to the students the kind of observations an experience field geologist would make, and thus set a kind of standard for the next day's work.  In effect, the diagrams said, this is what you should have seen today so that you may see more tomorrow.  I tried to do this for all the parties I visited so no one party had the advantage.

     The clouds part once again, and I see a small, balding man in the process of giving a lecture in the dining room of Gene Williams examining the Wasatch Faultthe Alta Peruvian.  The subject is a report of the U.S. Geological Survey entitled "Lake Bonneville" by G K Gilbert.  The lecturer is Dr. Larry Lattman, a Professor of Geomorphology at Penn State, and the subject the history of a Pleistocene lake which once occupied a much larger area surrounding the present Great Salt Lake.  The next day we will travel to the valley to examine the evidence.  For the history of the lake presented by Gilbert is one of the great classical papers in American geology.  In addition to providing the student with relevant technical aspects of a subject, it would be desirable if one could illustrate, by example, something which would represent the best of its kind as a way of providing inspiration.  Thus the students heard one of the most brilliant lecturers in geology speaking about one of America's greatest geologists and how he worked out the history of Lake Bonneville.  It is not necessary that everybody be good, but that there be an example of it somewhere.  That was a day, some forty years ago, near Salt Lake City, Utah, where that excellence was both seen and heard.  This was a rare treat, not only for the students but for all the faculty as well.

Left: Gene Williams examining the Wasatch Fault

     During my thirty years on the faculty at Penn State, I participated, in varying degrees, in Penn State Geology Field Camps.  They all had something to offer, but I felt that Alta was the most exciting, not only for excellence of exposure and varietie of problems and history, but also because few, if any, of the faculty were familiar with the geology of the region.  So we had to learn along with the students.  If effect, we had to teach by example.  Standing at the outcrop, facing students and colleagues, one had to "speak plain French."  If one could not, they would find you out, and you would lose your influence, to be taken over by another.  So there were natural leaders among faculty, just as there were among students.  It was for the director of the camp to find this out and to use the staff accordingly.  The camp director at Alta, Derrill Kerrick, was excellent in this regard.

     And now, one final thought.  Living in such close quarters with students and colleagues, one quickly learns about their personal and professional strengths and weaknesses, as well as your own, which is probably more important.  I will give just one example.  Sometime, during my stay at Alta, the camp was visited by Wayne Burnham, the Geoscience Department Head.  I was surprised to see him, because I felt that he did not have a high regard for field geology, inasmuch as his field was experimental geochemistry.  Well, I was wrong, very wrong.  The next day, I was even more surprised when he visited us in the field.  I was in the process of visiting one of the field parties mapping faulted alluvial fans high along the front of the Wasatch Range when I saw, far down the valley, a figure climbing up toward us.  As he approached, I saw that it was Wayne, huffing and puffing and obviously not in the best of shape.  He said to continue on with what we were doing; he would just observe.  But after a short while he asked a few pertinent questions and made some critical observations.  He had traveled some thousands of miles not just to review our efforts at the camp but to participate and to contribute.  Now, I'm really surprised and embarrassed because I realized that in all the years I had known Wayne, I had judged him to be a narrow specialist, and here he was talking about tectonics and sedimentation, my two specialties.  For years you can pass your colleagues in the hall or see them in the conference room and really know little about them, a condition that can be corrected by a few days in the field.  If I were a chair of a geology department, I think I might require all members to teach Summer Camp at least once, if only for getting them to know and appreciate their colleagues.

     Although the lengthening years now cast longer shadows on my memories of our summer camp at Alta, I feel that what I have related here is, for the most part, accurate and will remain one of the most pleasing periods of my teaching career, made possible by willing and able students, even though I cannot recall them all individually.  It was, indeed, "a time to remember."

                                                                ---- Gene

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images:

 

Alumni Field Camp 1977 Photos
       
Derrill Kerrick teaches in the SLC foothills
Derrill Kerrick & Gene Williams lecture at the Utah Survey in SLC
Derrill Kerrick & Gene Williams lecture in SLC
Dotty Duck & the Kerricks, Catherine Pass, Alta
Albion Basin, Alta
Williams & Kerrick photograph from the top of Snowbird

 

 

 

 Cross-country group at Dinosaur National Monument.

Cross-country group at Dinosaur National Monument. Far back: Stan Fielding, ?, Dan Chess, ?, Dean Schaefer; Middle: Ezat Heydari, ?, Glenn Lovitz, Dave Miller, John Hendler, Gloria DePaolis, Kate Chess, Toni Winslow, Eve Erskine, Sharon Leblanc, Teddy Hurliman Kreitz, Ruth Mazella; Front: Debbie Thompson, Carl H Taylor, John Weaver, Dick Craig, Danny Duck, James Fink, Dave Giffin. Credit: Kate & Dan Chess. IDs: Kate, Dan, Dave Giffin, Carl H Taylor

Field Camp 1978

Students
In 1978 the Geological Sciences Major included options in Geophysics, Geochemistry-Mineralogy, and Geology.  Geology and G&M required GSc 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic terms and summer GSc 472, Field Geology.  A pre-camp cross-country excursion was available as GSc 471.  Some of these names are from Kate and Dan Chess, supplemented by names from the database of 1979 Geosciences alumni that, hopefully, is a proxy for 1978 field camp.  There are more names than people at the camp, perhaps because some attended a year earlier or a year later.  Some of these alumni, in addition, may have been geophysics option, so would not have attended field camp.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
David E Bench  
Michael P Binder  
David B Bodnar  
Marsha Spencer Bollinger  
Lynn S Charuk  
Catherine (Kate) Connell Chess  
Daniel L Chess  
Gloria A DePaolis  
Paul S Dysart  
Evangeline V Erskine  
Patrick A (Pat) Fenderson  
Stanley J Fielding  
James C Fink  
David E (Dave) Giffin  
W Thomas (Tom) Goerold (MS80)  
Barbara L Hajel  
Ezat Heydari  
Douglas P Heller  
John W Hendler, Jr.  
Jeffrey L Hoffman  
Janet C Kappmeyer  
Timothy W (Kip) Kipp  
Theodora (Teddy) Hurliman Kreitz  
Joseph J Lee, Jr.  
Glenn Lovitz  
Ruth A Mazzella  
David Miller  
Sharon Leblanc Moate  
Cindie Lynch Mullen  
Timothy B Mullen  
Terance A O'Reilly  
Richard W Perry  
Dean A Schaefer  
Paul Sliva  
Darlene Mueser Smalley  
Richard C Smalley  
Carl H Taylor  
Debora B (Debbie) Thompson  
Nancy H Uziemblo  
Julian D Warner  
John M Weaver  
Toni Michele Winslow  

 

Faculty (thanks to Kate and Dan Chess and Paul Sliva for information on this year)
  
Gene Williams, Derrill Kerrick, Duff Gold, Art Rose (Allen White from LaTrobe Univ was along on the trip out)

TAs
   Dick (Rachel) Craig

Where They Stayed
   Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah

Major Projects
   Wasatch Front Quaternary geology, Alta overthrust, Black Rocks volcanic field, Alta stock, Alta skarns

Some Recollections about the 1978 Field Camp
Kate and Dan Chess

Dan Chess - 1978 Field CampWe did our west-bound cross-country trip through Illinois --- glacier geomorph (first night); through Nebraska and Colorado (second night); stopped at the USGS office in Denver, Red Rocks amphitheater west of Denver, Big Thompson Canyon (this was 3 years after the big flash flood), Rocky Mountain National park (third night); then hiked to the glacier in RMNP and toured the park, stopped at Craig Colorado (fourth night); drove thru Dinosaur Monument then Park City to Alta. Our fearless grad student TA was Dick Craig who survived the cross-country trip both out and back.

     The second night we missed a turn and instead of camping in a state park, we ended up pulling off the road and pitching our tents on grazing land. We all managed to miss the cow pies, but a few unlucky folks pitched their tents on ant mounds(!). So we awoke about an hour later to lots of yelling and swatting. A few ant bite victims slept in the van.....

     Dean drove our van thru Rocky Mountain National Park along the winding roadway with steep drop-offs. It was hot (no AC), so we had windows down. A huge insect flew in the window and landed on the ceiling right over Dean. The whole crew tried to figure out how to get this thing to fly away so it wouldn't land on Dean (who might just drive off the cliff). We tried to convince him to pull over, but since we'd just started this leg of the trip. and we were the last van, he wouldn't. Finally, one clever person asked for the map of Nebraska. John was riding shotgun and passed the map back in the van. The unusual request got Dean to pull over at the next opportunity (and make a few colorful comments about "we're in Colorado, so why do you want the @#$%^ map of Nebraska!"). Dean nearly jumped out of the van when he saw the creature. As soon as the van stopped, the map was used to crush the insect. There were bug guts/limbs flying everywhere!  From then on, "hand me the map of Nebraska" was used as a warning phrase (we still use it -- our daughter knows this story!)

     The first part of field camp was on the Wasatch Front and was taught by Gene Williams and Derrill Kerrick. The second half at the Albion Basin was taught by Duff Gold and Art Rose.  The first project we did (and I have some photos) was mapping the fault-displaced glacial sediments along the Wasatch. Then we did the work across from the Peruvian, and then the work around the stock, including the skarns.  We had a trip to the Black Rocks volcanic area, and we also visited the Bingham Canyon copper mine. At Black Rocks we're the group that was nearly thrown out of the Campground.... we were a lot noisier than the Boy Scouts.

     During the first few days of the Wasatch mapping exercise, most of the students ran out of water very early in the day because we weren't used to the >90 deg. temps/desert environment. One group got really dehydrated one day, so we ignored the "rule" and knocked on a door in the development to ask for water. We ended up with cookies and lemonade --- from a geology professor's wife (oops). Needless to say we were ratted on, and the whole camp got a lecture.

     In addition to Derrill's "lost" story, another "lost" story happened when we switched areas. One morning someone drove the professors to SLC airport, and they left at the same time the vans did. Gloria DePaolis was the driver of the Super Crustum (takeoff on the vehicle brand name Super Custom -- but the crew was the rowdiest... hence the nickname). Gloria was the last driver in the queue that morning and when she got to a key turn, she continued to follow the vehicle with the professors, not the vans going to the field location. She thus earned her own song -- a version of GLORIA ("she drives the wrong waaay"). We sang this with great gusto at every opportunity ( including years later!).

     On the first trip up the mountain at Alta, Terry picked up an unexploded shell (from the avalanche guns) and showed it to me [Kate].  I told him to carefully put it right back on the ground... and explained what it was! Terry hadn't notice the sign explaining what they were. We marked the location on our maps and reported it later that day. We were the first to discover one.  We thought it was wild to have an icon for bombs on our map legend. Later in the summer we were formally introduced to the "grey fox" who ran the gun (and detonated the shell we found). His real name escapes me...

     The Peruvian was terrible the year we were there. It was better sleeping in the campground! The food was a constant complaint. The cook was a real character, one of these scary guys. He really couldn't cook but took offense at every comment about the food. About halfway through the camp someone drove to SLC and bought a bunch of "real food" including Captain Crunch, etc. Duff throught that was really funny.  The cook was NOT amused, however. At the end of camp a whole group ganged up and threw the cook into the pool! We did call it the "Peruvian Slodge," and even decorated the sign out front with an extra S (see the photo).

     I [Kate] didn't go back with the crew, so I'm not sure what the stops were eastbound. I stayed for the IOGOD conference at Snowbird and took Greyhound back, with 3 boxes of rocks as luggage!

Professor Gene Williams on Field Camps in Utah in the 1970s

You asked me to give you some thoughts about my experiences at our Geology Summer Camp held in Alta, Utah, Gene Williamswhere I was an instructor for several years in the mid 1970s.  It is a sobering thought to know that our students there, so young and vibrant, apprehensive at being in the field for the first time in such forbidding terranes, are now well into their professional careers.  I cannot remember all their faces or their names, but I can still see them, with their packs and picks, boarding the vans in the morning in the parking lot of the Alta Peruvian Lodge for the trip down Little Cottonwood Canyon to the field area along the Watch Front above Salt Lake City.  For them, as well as for their teachers, the moment of truth has finally arrived.  For after years of sitting in classroom and laboratory, the student finally gets to face the rocks alone, and will find out how well he or she was instructed and has learned, and whether or not he or she has the capacity to apply such knowledge -- in effect, if he or she has the makings of a geologist.  I would hope that experience at Alta provided a solid base for future progress, because the geology of that area was most inspiring and wide-ranging.  I have no way of knowing how well they fared, for I have heard from very few.

     Now I see, between the partings in the dark clouds of the past, high on the Wasatch Front, small clusters of our students in the process of making their maps.  When I approach one of the parties, after much climbing, one of its members comes forward to meet me.  He is their leader, not because a vote was taken, but probably because he just took charge naturally.  He is not necessarily the brightest or the most aggressive, but somehow had the ability to command, just the way leaders emerged when I was in the military.  He had to report the progress of the work, answer my questions, and hear any criticism I might offer.  Dividing the students into field parties, although necessary, made it difficult to evaluate the final reports submitted by each student, because so much of the work was a joint effort.  I don't think we ever solved this difficulty in grading the final reports.

     Peering once again through the mists of the past, I see myself in the basement of the Alta Peruvian Lodge, making drawings on large sheets of brown wrapping paper.  Ah!!  Now it's all coming back.... I am transcribing my field notes and diagrams to be put on exhibit that evening.  They represent the results of observations I had made when I was out visiting the field parties.  It demonstrated to the students the kind of observations an experience field geologist would make, and thus set a kind of standard for the next day's work.  In effect, the diagrams said, this is what you should have seen today so that you may see more tomorrow.  I tried to do this for all the parties I visited so no one party had the advantage.

     The clouds part once again, and I see a small, balding man in the process of giving a lecture in the dining room of Gene Williamsthe Alta Peruvian.  The subject is a report of the U.S. Geological Survey entitled "Lake Bonneville" by G K Gilbert.  The lecturer is Dr. Larry Lattman, a Professor of Geomorphology at Penn State, and the subject the history of a Pleistocene lake which once occupied a much larger area surrounding the present Great Salt Lake.  The next day we will travel to the valley to examine the evidence.  For the history of the lake presented by Gilbert is one of the great classical papers in American geology.  In addition to providing the student with relevant technical aspects of a subject, it would be desirable if one could illustrate, by example, something which would represent the best of its kind as a way of providing inspiration.  Thus the students heard one of the most brilliant lecturers in geology speaking about one of America's greatest geologists and how he worked out the history of Lake Bonneville.  It is not necessary that everybody be good, but that there be an example of it somewhere.  That was a day, some forty years ago, near Salt Lake City, Utah, where that excellence was both seen and heard.  This was a rare treat, not only for the students but for all the faculty as well.

Left: Gene Williams examining the Wasatch Fault

     During my thirty years on the faculty at Penn State, I participated, in varying degrees, in Penn State Geology Field Camps.  They all had something to offer, but I felt that Alta was the most exciting, not only for excellence of exposure and varietie of problems and history, but also because few, if any, of the faculty were familiar with the geology of the region.  So we had to learn along with the students.  If effect, we had to teach by example.  Standing at the outcrop, facing students and colleagues, one had to "speak plain French."  If one could not, they would find you out, and you would lose your influence, to be taken over by another.  So there were natural leaders among faculty, just as there were among students.  It was for the director of the camp to find this out and to use the staff accordingly.  The camp director at Alta, Derrill Kerrick, was excellent in this regard.

     And now, one final thought.  Living in such close quarters with students and colleagues, one quickly learns about their personal and professional strengths and weaknesses, as well as your own, which is probably more important.  I will give just one example.  Sometime, during my stay at Alta, the camp was visited by Wayne Burnham, the Geoscience Department Head.  I was surprised to see him, because I felt that he did not have a high regard for field geology, inasmuch as his field was experimental geochemistry.  Well, I was wrong, very wrong.  The next day, I was even more surprised when he visited us in the field.  I was in the process of visiting one of the field parties mapping faulted alluvial fans high along the front of the Wasatch Range when I saw, far down the valley, a figure climbing up toward us.  As he approached, I saw that it was Wayne, huffing and puffing and obviously not in the best of shape.  He said to continue on with what we were doing; he would just observe.  But after a short while he asked a few pertinent questions and made some critical observations.  He had traveled some thousands of miles not just to review our efforts at the camp but to participate and to contribute.  Now, I'm really surprised and embarrassed because I realized that in all the years I had known Wayne, I had judged him to be a narrow specialist, and here he was talking about tectonics and sedimentation, my two specialties.  For years you can pass your colleagues in the hall or see them in the conference room and really know little about them, a condition that can be corrected by a few days in the field.  If I were a chair of a geology department, I think I might require all members to teach Summer Camp at least once, if only for getting them to know and appreciate their colleagues.

     Although the lengthening years now cast longer shadows on my memories of our summer camp at Alta, I feel that what I have related here is, for the most part, accurate and will remain one of the most pleasing periods of my teaching career, made possible by willing and able students, even though I cannot recall them all individually.  It was, indeed, "a time to remember."

                                                                ---- Gene

1978 Penn State Geosciences Field Camp
 

Derrill Kerrick - 1978 Field CampDerrill Kerrick remembers that in 1978 the students were not happy with the food or the quality of the facilities at the Alta Peruvian Lodge.  They took to calling it the Alta Peruvian Slodge (see photo and the recollections of Kate and Dan Chess).  At the end of camp they sabotaged the plumbing system with toilet paper, a system that teetered on the edge of functionality in the best of circumstances.

He also remembers that two students, while mapping on the Alta stock isograds project, lost track of where they were, both on the map and on the ground.  They crossed over the ridge between Alta and Snowbird and, by now WAY out of the area, headed down toward Heber City.  They somehow ended up in Provo, to which Dick Craig drove and picked them up.

Some additional remarks on the Peruvian over the years
David Eggler

     As Derrill and Kate and Dan Chess say in the accompanying pieces, in 1978 the students were not happy with the food or the quality of the facilities at the Alta Peruvian Lodge.

     The field school did not return to the Peruvian until 1981. By then, the facility architecture had changed considerably, much closer to its present configuration.  The school subsequently used the Peruvian, except for 1987, through 2000.  After 2000, the Peruvian essentially suspended all summer activities.  I stayed at the Peruvian from 1984 through 2000, except in 1987 when we stayed in the Alta Lodge up the road.  The food ranged from pretty good to very good.  For the most part, the cooks were professionals, although we had to deal with our share of summering ski bums.  And the "endless fruit salads" -- there would be a reception, conference, or wedding at the resort, after which we'd get the excellent leftovers.  The leftovers lasted for a meal or two, but the fruit salad would be put in the refrigerator and added to for days and days afterwards, appearing nightly at our meal.  On the other hand, for several years, the Peruvian had a Sunday brunch.  For a slight premium, we could dine with the "real people" on linen tablecloths, with piano music in the background, on an excellent brunch buffet.  And on Sunday evenings, although we had to barbecue them ourselves, we'd have burgers and steaks.  I have heard rumors that in years past field camp would foot the bill for a keg on weekends.

     Alumni from various eras will remember the cast of characters at the resort, including RT, Ed, and Jerry, although sometime in the 1990s the staff became much more "corporate."  The characters started with the owner, John Cahir.  He would appear occasionally in his Porsche, in his earlier years accompanied by young women and in later years talking up marathons and biking.  He also would occasionally treat the faculty, in earlier years, to dinners at his restaurant near the foot of the canyon, La Caille, with its resident peacocks.  Those dinners were, unfortunately, before my time.

     The physical facility improved over the years, particularly in the 1990s, when the resort used more professional construction people and fewer summering ski bums.  The plumbing system, which dated from the time that a pair of wooden, three-story barracks buildings were hauled up the canyon from the shuttered Bushnell Hospital at Brigham, was reworked several times, although some of the hot/cold faucets were still reversed.  The Alta Peruvian is today an excellent and relatively inexpensive place to stay for skiing in some of the most wonderful snow on Earth

 

 
       
       
 

 

 

 

Click on the images to enlarge: (thanks to Kate and Dan Chess for the photos)

 

Alumni Field Camp 1978 Photos
       
The T-shirt, designed by Dave Giffin, shows the mountains behind the Peruvian from the opposite hillslope.
Somewhere in Illinois on the cross-country trip. Ruth (green shirt), Dan and Danny Duck in foreground
Lecture at Red Rocks (Denver). Gloria (facing camera), Eve (yellow slicker) and Dan (blue shirt)
Dick Craig lectures in Rocky Mtn Natl Park
Stan and Dave in snow, Rocky Mtn Natl Park camp Eve at a bonfire, FishLake Natl Forest Stan in Dinosaur Natl Monument
Teddy, Tom (facing camera), and Stan hiking in Dinosaur Natl Monument Stopping at a Philips Petroleum pipeline Sulfur pit in southern Utah Picnic at Milford, Utah. Paul Sliva (cowboy hat), Dan, Mark Smolley (red shirt) and Toni at right
A tower of geoscientists at Milford Three towers at Milford. Derrill at bottom left of the human tower Teddy at Lake Mary, Alta-Brighton area Students at Lake Mary, Alta-Brighton area
Tim and Cindy Muller (center two) at Lake Mary Derrill goes into the pool at the Alta Peruvian Derrill and the cook in the pool at the Alta Peruvian (see the Chess narrative) The Alta Peruvian Slodge (see the Chess narrative and look carefully for the "S")

 

 

 Field Camp 1979. Stockdale kimberlite pipe, Kansas.

Stockdale kimberlite pipe, Kansas

Field Camp 1979

Students
In 1979 the Geological Sciences degree was changed to Geosciences, and options became the general option, biogeology, and geophysics.  The general option and biogeology required Geosc 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic year and summer Geosc 472, Field Geology.  A pre-camp cross-country excursion was available as GSc 471.  Most of these names are from the database of 1980 Geosciences alumni that, hopefully, is a proxy for 1979 field camp, although some may have attended a year earlier.  Some of these alumni, in addition, may have been geophysics option, so would not have attended field camp.  Thanks to Martin Farley for additional names.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Michael F Barilar  
Candyce (Candy) L Beck-Brake  
Robert A Brozdowski  
George E Bureau  
Robert E Eberley  
Martin B Farley (PhD87)  
Jonathan H FitzGerald  
Ronald J Forlina  
Herbert E Fry  
Dixie A Hambrick  
Paul W Hare  
Gary A Hummel  
Stephen R Jurewicz  
Robert M Kandratavich  
Cynthia L Kramer  
Thomas M Leaf  
Frederick H (Fritz) Main, Jr.  
Barbara A Mangieri  
Donna Reynolds Matthews  
David H (Dave) McCarren  
Joel G McKinnon  
Scott C O'Brien  
Daniel Pettit  
Michael R (Mike) Reading  
Thomas C Simonton  
David L Sonnenfeld  
Don Voigt (MS83)  
Barbara J Wanamaker  
Paul W Zimmerman  
Christopher F (Chris) Brake  
David Miller  
Lawrence C (Larry) Murdoch  
William R Snook  
Joe Campisi  
Dennis C O'Neill  

 

Faculty (thanks to Martin Farley for information on this year)
   Duff Gold, Rudy Slingerland, Gene Williams, Charles Thornton, Derrill Kerrick

TAs
   Larry Garmezy

Where They Stayed
   Rustler Lodge, Alta, Utah -- the one and only season at the Rustler

Major Projects
   Parleys Canyon, Salt Lake area geomorphology, Alta overthrust, Black Rocks volcanics, Alta stock

Martin Farley remembers "We visited the Stockdale kimberlite outside Manhattan, Kansas, when night was falling, as the photo you've posted shows....  The field camp exercises were all in the Salt Lake area. I specifically recall that the Parleys Canyon exercise required crossing I-80. Having been through Salt Lake City fairly regularly in the last 15 years, I can say that you couldn't cross I-80 on foot now as we did then (leaving aside whether it was prudent to do so even then). I also remember, not fondly, the moraine climb."

Dave McCarren: "Many memories of those trips.  I took the field trip in '79 and  graduated in '79.  Mike Reading did also.  We were both in ROTC and those summer requirements prevented us from taking the trip in the junior summer.   I don't get much of an opportunity to talk about Geology anymore, although I do have a couple friends in the Geology Department here at the University of Delaware that I occasionally get to interact with.   After 20 years in the Navy, with 13 as a Naval Oceanographer, my time is mostly spent making sure our biotech researchers can get their projects moving."

Professor Gene Williams on Field Camps in Utah in the 1970s

You asked me to give you some thoughts about my experiences at our Geology Summer Camp held in Alta, Utah, Gene Williamswhere I was an instructor for several years in the mid 1970s.  It is a sobering thought to know that our students there, so young and vibrant, apprehensive at being in the field for the first time in such forbidding terranes, are now well into their professional careers.  I cannot remember all their faces or their names, but I can still see them, with their packs and picks, boarding the vans in the morning in the parking lot of the Alta Peruvian Lodge for the trip down Little Cottonwood Canyon to the field area along the Watch Front above Salt Lake City.  For them, as well as for their teachers, the moment of truth has finally arrived.  For after years of sitting in classroom and laboratory, the student finally gets to face the rocks alone, and will find out how well he or she was instructed and has learned, and whether or not he or she has the capacity to apply such knowledge -- in effect, if he or she has the makings of a geologist.  I would hope that experience at Alta provided a solid base for future progress, because the geology of that area was most inspiring and wide-ranging.  I have no way of knowing how well they fared, for I have heard from very few.

     Now I see, between the partings in the dark clouds of the past, high on the Wasatch Front, small clusters of our students in the process of making their maps.  When I approach one of the parties, after much climbing, one of its members comes forward to meet me.  He is their leader, not because a vote was taken, but probably because he just took charge naturally.  He is not necessarily the brightest or the most aggressive, but somehow had the ability to command, just the way leaders emerged when I was in the military.  He had to report the progress of the work, answer my questions, and hear any criticism I might offer.  Dividing the students into field parties, although necessary, made it difficult to evaluate the final reports submitted by each student, because so much of the work was a joint effort.  I don't think we ever solved this difficulty in grading the final reports.

     Peering once again through the mists of the past, I see myself in the basement of the Alta Peruvian Lodge, making drawings on large sheets of brown wrapping paper.  Ah!!  Now it's all coming back.... I am transcribing my field notes and diagrams to be put on exhibit that evening.  They represent the results of observations I had made when I was out visiting the field parties.  It demonstrated to the students the kind of observations an experience field geologist would make, and thus set a kind of standard for the next day's work.  In effect, the diagrams said, this is what you should have seen today so that you may see more tomorrow.  I tried to do this for all the parties I visited so no one party had the advantage.

     The clouds part once again, and I see a small, balding man in the process of giving a lecture in the dining room of Gene Williamsthe Alta Peruvian.  The subject is a report of the U.S. Geological Survey entitled "Lake Bonneville" by G K Gilbert.  The lecturer is Dr. Larry Lattman, a Professor of Geomorphology at Penn State, and the subject the history of a Pleistocene lake which once occupied a much larger area surrounding the present Great Salt Lake.  The next day we will travel to the valley to examine the evidence.  For the history of the lake presented by Gilbert is one of the great classical papers in American geology.  In addition to providing the student with relevant technical aspects of a subject, it would be desirable if one could illustrate, by example, something which would represent the best of its kind as a way of providing inspiration.  Thus the students heard one of the most brilliant lecturers in geology speaking about one of America's greatest geologists and how he worked out the history of Lake Bonneville.  It is not necessary that everybody be good, but that there be an example of it somewhere.  That was a day, some forty years ago, near Salt Lake City, Utah, where that excellence was both seen and heard.  This was a rare treat, not only for the students but for all the faculty as well.

Left: Gene Williams examining the Wasatch Fault

     During my thirty years on the faculty at Penn State, I participated, in varying degrees, in Penn State Geology Field Camps.  They all had something to offer, but I felt that Alta was the most exciting, not only for excellence of exposure and varietie of problems and history, but also because few, if any, of the faculty were familiar with the geology of the region.  So we had to learn along with the students.  If effect, we had to teach by example.  Standing at the outcrop, facing students and colleagues, one had to "speak plain French."  If one could not, they would find you out, and you would lose your influence, to be taken over by another.  So there were natural leaders among faculty, just as there were among students.  It was for the director of the camp to find this out and to use the staff accordingly.  The camp director at Alta, Derrill Kerrick, was excellent in this regard.

     And now, one final thought.  Living in such close quarters with students and colleagues, one quickly learns about their personal and professional strengths and weaknesses, as well as your own, which is probably more important.  I will give just one example.  Sometime, during my stay at Alta, the camp was visited by Wayne Burnham, the Geoscience Department Head.  I was surprised to see him, because I felt that he did not have a high regard for field geology, inasmuch as his field was experimental geochemistry.  Well, I was wrong, very wrong.  The next day, I was even more surprised when he visited us in the field.  I was in the process of visiting one of the field parties mapping faulted alluvial fans high along the front of the Wasatch Range when I saw, far down the valley, a figure climbing up toward us.  As he approached, I saw that it was Wayne, huffing and puffing and obviously not in the best of shape.  He said to continue on with what we were doing; he would just observe.  But after a short while he asked a few pertinent questions and made some critical observations.  He had traveled some thousands of miles not just to review our efforts at the camp but to participate and to contribute.  Now, I'm really surprised and embarrassed because I realized that in all the years I had known Wayne, I had judged him to be a narrow specialist, and here he was talking about tectonics and sedimentation, my two specialties.  For years you can pass your colleagues in the hall or see them in the conference room and really know little about them, a condition that can be corrected by a few days in the field.  If I were a chair of a geology department, I think I might require all members to teach Summer Camp at least once, if only for getting them to know and appreciate their colleagues.

     Although the lengthening years now cast longer shadows on my memories of our summer camp at Alta, I feel that what I have related here is, for the most part, accurate and will remain one of the most pleasing periods of my teaching career, made possible by willing and able students, even though I cannot recall them all individually.  It was, indeed, "a time to remember."

                                                                ---- Gene

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images:

 

Alumni Field Camp 1979 Photos
       
Two Buttes, Colorado
Cripple Creek, Colorado
Collecting from waste pile, Cripple Creek
Cripple Creek, Colorado
Near the Cripple Creek road Rustler today

 

 

 

 

 

 Field Camp 1980

Field trip "kitchen group" partners, probably Daniel's Pass overlook southeast of Heber City, Utah. 23 June 1980Left to right: Kelly Bortle, Julianne Turko, Kirk Hardy, Wynne Walker, Mark Stalter, Margaret Hoffman, and Mike Pozenbanchuk. Photo courtesy of Kirk Hardy.

Click here for a photo at Stockdale Kimberlite, Kansas that shows much of the group

Field Camp 1980

Students
In 1980 options for the Geosciences degree were the general option, biogeology, and geophysics.  The general option and biogeology required Geosc 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic year and summer Geosc 472, Field Geology.  A pre-camp cross-country excursion was available as GSc 471.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Jeffrey Allen  
Margaret Ashbrook  
Charles Baron  
Ronald Bilotti  
Kelly Bortle  
Lisa Bratton  
Eric Brown  
Michael Burns  
Jeffrey Buzonas  
Frank Carolas  
Adam Crist  
Bruce Crocker  
Peter DeBarber  
Duane Dopkin  
James Dorian  
Ron Eberly  
Stephen Field  
Thomas Fitzpatrick  
Kirk Hardy  
Paul Heidgerd  
Margaret Hoffman  
Lawrence Holgate  
David Kistner  
Joseph Kordzi  
James Lehrman  
Brian Lipsitz  
Jeffrey List  
Ruth Mallette  
Joel Mazer  
William McCloskey  
Gordon McCurry  
Barton McManus  
Edward Mikucki  
Sarah Miller (Univ Maine)  
Bruce Nichols  
Thomas Panian  
Michael Pozenbanchuk  
Ivan Puplidy  
Donna Reynolds  
Joel Richman  
James Rutledge  
Joseph Sita  
Rodney Slota  
Vincent Sortman  
Mark Stalter  
Kim Touysinhthiphonexay (MS82, PhD87)  
Julianne Turko  
Mark Ulrich  
Steve VanKouteren  
Donald Varner  
Wynne Walker  
Michael Walsh  
Nikki White  
Edward Wilcosky  
David Witter  
Kenneth Young  
Alexander Zdzinski  

 

Faculty

    Tom Gardner, Duff Gold, Derrill Kerrick, Rudy Slingerland

TAs
   Don Voigt (MS83), John Stamm (MS81), Doug Tietbohl (MS81)

Where They Stayed
   Van Cott Apartments, U of U, Salt Lake City

Major Projects
   Parleys Canyon, Salt Lake area geomorphology, Alta overthrust, Black Rocks volcanics, Alta stock

Michael Pozenbanchuk writes that "My career now involves nothing about geology, but I am still in science and engineering [with Shell Global Solutions] and still use a lot of what I learned way back then."  We were saddened to learn that Mike died in 2008 in Houston.

Kirk Hardy writes that "Looking back on field camp almost 33 years later, I realize what an important role that John, Don, Doug, Tom, Derrill, Rudy, Duff, and my field partners played in inspiring what became a lifelong passion for geology as a career and the Rockies as a home. So, here’s a belated but heartfelt “Thank you!” to John, Don, Doug, Tom, Derrill, Rudy, Duff, Ruth Mallette, Kelly Bortle, Julianne Turko, Margaret Hoffman, Wynne Walker, Mark Stalter, Mike Pozebanchuk, and Ron Eberly—especially Duff and John—for the geology adventure of a lifetime, and the confidence and inspiration to become a proud Penn State geologist."  Kirk has been working for an environmental geology consulting firm in Laramie, Wyoming since 1993.

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge more images: (thanks to Kirk Hardy for most of these and for captioning them)

 

Alumni Field Camp 1980 Photos
       
1980 T-shirt. Design by John Stamm.
Indiana Dunes State Park, south shore of Lake Michigan, near Tremont, Indiana, 15 June 1980.
Indiana Dunes State Park, south shore of Lake Michigan, near Tremont, Indiana, 15 June 1980.  Note MANY blue vans!
Graham Cave State Park, near Danville, Missouri, 16 June 1980.
Historic Front Street, Dodge City, Kansas, 17 June 1980. Stockdale kimberlite, Kansas Stockdale kimberlite Stockdale kimberlite
Tom Gardner ponders soil at Stockdale On the climb to the summit of Two Buttes, Two Buttes Reservoir State Fishing Area, near Two Buttes, Colorado, 18 June 1980. Commodore Mine workings on the Creede Caldera rim, 19 June 1980. The rocks are ash-flow deposits from the main volcanic vent, 26-30 m.y. old. Commodore Mine
camp Wallowing in the drums sands along the Green River near Split Mtn Gorge, Dinosaur National Monument, near Vernal, Utah, 22 June 1980.  Left to right: Ron Eberly, Mark Stalter, Daver Kistner, Kirk Hardy, Jim Lehrman, Tom Panian, and unknown. View west from the Flagstaff arete, Wasatch Mtns above Alta, Utah, 9 July 1980. Pumice Hole Mine, Mineral Mtns, near Milford, Utah, 17 July 1980.
Bingham Canyon open pit mine, Bingham Canyon, Oquirrh Range, outside Salt Lake City, 23 July 1980.  Interesting historical photo. Today the pit walls are much steeper, just short of a failure slope, and the benches aresteeper and more widely-spaced because ore is moved by truck, not railroad cars. The Albion Basin, Wasatch Mtns above Salt Lake City, 30 July 1980. This was the setting for the 3rd through 6th mapping exercises. View south toward Mount Olympus in the Wasatch Mtns from Van Cott Apartments, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, 4 August 1980.  The camp stayed at the Van Cott while mapping near Salt Lake City.

 

 

 

 

 

 Field Camp 1981. Blizzard at Earthquake Lake, Montana.

Blizzard at Earthquake Lake, Montana

Field Camp 1981

Students
In 1981 options for the Geosciences degree were the general option, biogeology, and geophysics.  The general option and biogeology required Geosc 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic year and summer Geosc 472, Field Geology.  A pre-camp cross-country excursion was available as GSc 471.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Tim Acker  
David Bisko  
Richard Borden  
Sean Coveney  
Randy Deardorff  
Edward Dihrberg  
Sharon Gabel  
Kathleen Garland  
Dru Germanoski  
Duane Heckman  
Karl Keim  
Larry Kodosky  
Karl Lindenmuth  
Bill Mader  
Vasilios Mandros  
Steven Markgraf  
Rob McDowell  
Howard McIlvreid  
Michael Morgart  
Tom Neefe  
Brian Pearce  
Steven Poli  
Martin Portik  
Terry Reilly  
Stephen Salyards  
Keven Sech  
Todd Skogg  
Carl Smajda  
Chris Smith  
Eric Sonnenthal  
Richard Spiese  
Mike Sukop  
Thomas Swerzenski  
Nancy Vanocker  
Howard Wheeler  
James White  
Terence Wolf  
Brian Young  

Faculty

   Duff Gold, Tom Gardner, Derrill Kerrick, Rudy Slingerland

TAs
   Yen Touysinhthiphonexay (MS81), Sarah Miller, Larry Lew (PhD85)

Where They Stayed
   Northwest Community College, Powell, Wyoming; U of U, Salt Lake City; Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Salt Lake area surficial deposits, Alta overthrust, Alta stock

Field Camp Class of 1981

Comments and Weblinks from the Field Camp Class of 1981

 

Marty Portik: "I just stumbled upon the alumni pages for field camp; I got a huge kick out of them.   I went in 1981 and always had great memories, including the snowstorm at Yellowstone.  I also got a big laugh over one of the other pictures -- the one at Craters of the Moon.  That's me holding the boulder up over my head.  I vaguely remember that picture being taken but not who took it.  I'm not a geologist anymore (since the great oilfield layoffs in 1983).  I am a construction manager for a large engineering firm and earned a 2nd BS in civil engineering from Drexel University in 2002 and am now a licensed P.E. in Pennsylvania."

Jim White: "The Field Trip Alumni page is great.  Brings back many memories (all good!).  I am currently President, Quantum Geophysical in Houston.... I was recently President & CEO, Trace Energy Services, Ltd. in Calgary until we were bought in 2005 and prior to that I was with Western Geophysical (now WesternGeco) for over 25 years.  As some would know, I worked on seismic field crews over the summer months of my college years and have continued on."

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images: (thanks to Howard Wheeler for many of these)

 

Alumni Field Camp 1981 Photos
       
Scenic view at Field Camp 1981
Van Hise's Rock, Wisconsin
Badlands
Mt Rushmore
 Scenic view at Field Camp 1981 Blizzard at Hebgen Lake blizzard at Hebgen Lake Yellowstone Falls
 Scenic view at Field Camp 1981 The "delta S" group (the Lew-Garland van) at the Gros Ventre landslide And the delta S van more of the entropy van
 Student from field camp 1981 Tetons Marty Portik at Craters of the Moon At a mall, SLC area
 Scenic view at Field Camp 1981 Group in Little Cottonwood canyon, including Tom Gardner Larry Lew and friends near Duff's bench, Alta singing at Alta
 Student from field camp 1981 typical Alta Peruvian room morning on the Alta overthrust project playtime at the Alta Peruvian
 Scenic view at Field Camp 1981  Scenic view at Field Camp 1981  Student from field camp 1981  Scenic view at Field Camp 1981
Student from field camp 1981 Scenic view at Field Camp 1981 Scenic view at Field Camp 1981
Scenic view at Field Camp 1981 Scenic view at Field Camp 1981 Scenic view of the sky at Field Camp 1981 Student from field camp 1981
Students from field camp 1981 Scenic view at Field Camp 1981
Scenic view at Field Camp 1981 Students from field camp 1981 Scenic view at Field Camp 1981 Student from field camp 1981
Scenic view at Field Camp 1981 Scenic view at Field Camp 1981 Scenic view at Field Camp 1981
Scenic view at Field Camp 1981 Scenic view at Field Camp 1981 Student from field camp 1981 Scenic view at Field Camp 1981
Wildlife visit during Field Camp Scenic view at Field Camp 1981 Students from field camp 1981 Scenic view at Field Camp 1981
Scenic view at Field Camp 1981      

 

 

 

 

 

 Field Camp 1982. Group at the Tetons.

Group at the Tetons (note Toms's lectures pad at the rear). Credit: Duff Gold

Field Camp 1982

Students
In 1982 options for the Geosciences degree were the general option, biogeology, and geophysics.  The general option and biogeology required Geosc 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic year and summer Geosc 472, Field Geology.  Tim Demko says that the pre-camp cross-country excursion, GSc 471, was not available, but that the students did it anyway without credit!

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Ellen Abramson (Johns Hopkins)  
Dike Andre  
Scott Barnes  
Jim Bowers  
Thomas Boyd  
Mike Conrad  
John Cousins  
Doug Cordelli  
Brett Coryell  
Ken Cruikshank  
Tim Demko  
John Dougherty  
Kim Fasching  
Donna Fisher  
Bert Forster  
Richardo Garcia  
John Gilliland (Cal State Sonoma)  
Dave Hartman  
Michael Herring  
Bryan Hoke  
Ed Juddo  
Robert Lux  
Teresa Marva  
Nancy Mancuso  
David Mooney  
Maureen Navin  
Matthew Noblet  
Ken Peace  
Margery Perko  
Andrew Phelps  
James Poli  
Chris Ravotti  
John Ritter  
Joe Sadlik  
Greg Schafer  
Scott Shaw  
Diane Smith  
Susan Spangler (Univ of Delaware)  
Jeff Swane  
Nils Thompson  
Michael Weber  
Charles Whipkey  
Brian Yeich  

 

Faculty (thanks to Tim Demko)
   Duff Gold, Tom Gardner, Derrill Kerrick, Charles Thornton.  Rudy Slingerland was supposed to participate, but he had broken his right foot.

TAs
   Jamie Connolly, Brian Dade, Kim Touysinhthiphonexay (MS82, PhD87), Alex Nitkiewicz

Where They Stayed
   Northwest Community College, Powell, Wyoming; U of U, Salt Lake City; Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Wasatch strip map, Alta overthrust, Alta stock. Tim Demko says that "instead of the SLC surficial deposits map, we did a bedrock mapping  exercise in the foothills of the Wasatch Mountains (or crawling on my hands and knees through scrub oak, as I remember it).... The Alta glacial mapping project was cancelled due to the immense snowpack that year."

Comments from the Penn State Field Camp Class of 1982

Kim Fasching - 1982 Field CampKim Fasching: "Oh how the years have flown by.  I took your petrology final on my 21st birthday and just knew I was going to die before I had a chance to be legal downtown....  I mudlogged for a while in Wyoming after graduation, then continued with an ed. degree at U of Wyoming and have been happily teaching 8th grade physical science for 17 years in California.  Thanks for the site and the good memories it brought back."

Kim Fasching
Science Teacher, Wells Middle School
 

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the pictures: (thanks to Tim Demko for many of these)

 

Alumni Field Camp 1982 Photos
       
T-shirt
DuPage County, Illinois landfill
Van Hise's Rock
Van Hise's Rock, Wisconsin
Ken Peace in the Wisconsin Dells Rob Lux in the Wisconsin Dells Iowa rest stop Kim T in a van
Duluth, Minnesota Duluth Gabbro area Minnesota taconite Donna Fisher views the Mesabi Range
Badlands Badlands, SD Andy Phelps in the Badlands Jeff Swane and Tom Boyd in the Badlands
Sunset in the Badlands Homestake Mine Black Hills pegmatite Sketching at Devils Tower. Penn State Archives
Parade of vans in the Bighorns Sheridan Lake, WY Dead Indian Hill Silvergate (Heart Mtn detachment)
Silvergate (Heart Mtn detachment) Clarks Fork Canyon Clarks Fork Canyon Tom Gardner at Clarks Fork Canyon
Beartooth Butte Lake Hebgen Lake More stone throwing at Hebgen Lake Earthquake slide area, Hebgen
West Yellowstone camp Tetons Gros Ventre landslide Super Ellen at Craters of the Moon
Measurements on Wasatch Fault, SLC area. Penn State Archives Little Cottonwood Canyon leisure at the Alta Peruvian

 

 

 

 

 

 Field Camp 1983. Group at Yellowstone Falls.

Group at Yellowstone Falls

Field Camp 1983

Students
In 1983 options for the Geosciences degree were the general option, biogeology, and geophysics.  The general option and biogeology required Geosc 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic year and summer Geosc 472, Field Geology.  A pre-camp cross-country excursion was available as GSc 471.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Daniel Beaber  
Douglas Boyer  
Mark Burrell  
Ronald Carper, Jr.  
Jeffrey Clark  
Karen Clemens  
Amy Clifton  
Cathleen Collins  
John Coyne  
Brian Cully  
Glenn Duffield  
Peter Evans  
Mark Hainsey  
Rob Jacobs  
Karen Kraynack  
Robert Leet  
Susan Letner  
Michelle Lorah  
Jay Lynch  
Raymond Miller  
Gerald O'Neill  
Gil Oudijk  
Jeffrey Painter  
John Peter  
Thomas Rutherford  
Joanne Salerno  
Alan Salvadori  
Theresa Sanders  
Jeffrey Schell  
Kathryn Schultz  
Tracy Joe Seibert  
Daniel Sheftick  
Lauren Marie Showak  
Corey Smith  
Robert Sobocinski  
Hugh Swearman  
Stephen (Steve) Urbanik  
Anthony Vellios  
Michael Waltz  
Scott Wendler  
Robert Wojciak  
Robert Zelley  

 

Faculty
   Duff Gold, Charles Thornton, Tom Gardner, Rudy Slingerland, Derrill Kerrick

TAs
   Roland Sauermann, Bob Brozdowskiz

Where They Stayed
   Northwest Community College, Powell, Wyoming; U of U, Salt Lake City; Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Wasatch strip map, Salt Lake area surficial deposits, Alta overthrust, Alta stock

Rob Leet Revisits Alta in December, 2013

Rob Leet - 1983 Field Camp

After graduating from PSU in 1984, Rob obtained a PhD from the University of Washington in 1991.  He is presently (2014) a Senior Environmental Geologist with GeoEngineers in Seattle.  Alta Ale - 1983 Field Camp

He revisited Alta in 2013.  He writes: "In late December 2013, I returned to the Little Cottonwood Canyon for the first time since my original visit with the PSU field school crew 30 years ago.  This time I wasn’t there to map the geology, but rather to experience the legendary Utah powder with my family (wife Sue, daughter Donna [20], and son Rob [19]).  It hadn’t snowed for a week by the time we arrived on the 26th, so we didn’t get to experience knee-deep powder as I had hoped.  Nonetheless, it was great to take in the splendor of the familiar north canyon wall in the late afternoon sun from the ski slopes of Alta and Snowbird.  Flying downhill on skis is certainly a more efficient way to cover the canyon’s vast acreage than hiking up and down the rocky slopes carrying a rock hammer, triplet, and field book!  A highlight for me was walking the halls of the Alta Peruvian Lodge once again, re-living great memories from the Summer of 1983 and realizing how little the lodge has changed.  I felt a sentimental bond with the canyon, and I dream of returning again someday in hopes of floating effortlessly through heaps of dry, fluffy snow."

He included images of the Alta Peruvian sign (little changed in 30 years) and a vintage Alta Ale.



 

Alta Peruvian Lodge - 1987 Field Camp

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images:

 

Alumni Field Camp 1983 Photos
       
Lead, South Dakota
Homestake Mine
Devils Tower
Wyodak coal mine
Wyodak, drying out Thermopolis Thermopolis Hot Spring Line Creek exercise
Elk Basin mapping Bob Brozdowski at an Elk Basin fault Dead Indian Hill Tower Falls, Yellowstone
Yellowstone outcrop traversing a pit crater at Craters of the Moon Craters of the Moon  Michelle Lorah & John Peter Rudy lectures on Bonneville lake sediments at SLC
Rudy lectures on Bonneville lake sediments at SLC Lecturing on glacial geology, amid snowy outcrops Alta overthrust project

 

 

 

 

 

 1984 Penn State Geosciences Field Camp group

Group at Yellowstone Falls

Field Camp 1984

Students
In 1984 options for the Geosciences degree were the general option, biogeology, and geophysics.  The general option and biogeology required Geosc 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic year and summer Geosc 472, Field Geology.  A pre-camp cross-country excursion was available as GSc 471.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Alan Ahrens  
Richard Aschenbrenner  
Carl Baniszewski  
Lou Bartek  
Kenneth Bower, Jr.  
Keith Carlson  
Andy Czebieniak  
John Dellaport  
Thomas Dolak  
Michael Dowger  
Tom Ei  
Jeffrey Evers  
Richard Hazenstab  
Robert Hinkley  
Kurt Homnick  
Steve Jabo  
Jerry Kashatus  
Karen Kishbaugh  
Dagmar Kohl  
Robert Lausch  
Sharon Locke  
Curt Lure  
Robert Morrell  
Danny Parker  
Teresa Royek  
Don Shields  
Gary Starr  
Carrie Stock Bartek  
Matt Stover  
Peter Volpinari  
David Wenman  
Cheryl Wentzell  

 

Faculty
   Duff Gold, Charlie Thornton, Dave Eggler, Tom Gardner, Rudy Slingerland

TAs
   Chris Shuman, Kathy Garland, Suzanne Weedman, Beverly Blakeney

Where They Stayed
   Northwest Community College, Powell, Wyoming; Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah; Monroe Hot Springs, Utah

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Salt Lake area surficial deposits, Gun Club quarry, Marysvale volcanics, Alta overthrust, Alta stock

Dave Eggler remembers a few things about 1984

Dave Eggler - 1984 Field CampThe first Penn State field camp I taught was in 1984, and for the shortest period.  I was there for a couple days of the overthrust project and for the stock project.  I made a map of the overthrust area, from the USGS map, that I used for 20 years, and which Don Fisher is presumably still using.  I actually mapped the country rocks areas north and south of the stock, along with the students, and I used that map for 20 years, augmented a little from time to time as I gained a new insight.  I developed some lecture sketches for the stock project from the Kerrick and Moore paper -- a cartoon of the stock and isograds and triangular CMS diagrams for the various facies through the isograds.  I used those diagrams for 20 years both in field camp and back home for Geosc 430 and, upon its demise, Geosc 201.

The area north of the stock had always been mapped on an aerial photo.  Not a stereopair, but one areal photo.  This, to me, is a crazy idea.  With stereo, you can see every peaklet and valley.  Without stereo, the only way to locate yourself is to find a tree or tree-less meadow on the photo that might be the one you are sitting in.  The "Big Ten" field camp mapped the area south of the stock that way for many years.  To help the students, a series of stations had been established and linked by plane table survey.  These station numbers or letters were re-spray-painted each year on rocks. They went from A to Z and maybe 1 to 12.  Fortunately or unfortunately, the pile of photos was left behind in State College that summer.  So a supply of topo maps was hastily constructed.  Charlie Thornton more-or-less located each station on the map from an existing photo.  In retrospect, he did an excellent job.  Chris Shuman and I then climbed up scree slopes and pinnacles to spray paint while Charlie stood below and directed us.  I kept on spraying stations for a few years, then gradually decreased the number of stations as I increased the size of the area mapped, and eventually just marked a few of them with orange surveyors tape, because painting didn't seem very ecologically friendly.  Plus one year the Forest Service was wondering why some nut was spray painting their forest.  There's probably still a little faded orange tape clinging to a scrubby tree by station T, located at the top of the rocky pitch on the way up to Twin Lakes pass.

     We climbed into the northern area from the campground road, a pretty good chug early in the morning.  I usually led, going at the pace I had used since working in the forest service while in college -- not too fast but never stopping.  Lou Bartek was a football player, and football players don't do slow and steady.  He finally said, "The heck with it," and charged ahead, then paused, and charged again.  We of course arrived about the same time.

     This was the only time that my family accompanied me to field camp.  The kids were nine and seven.  We had slowly driven our way across the country, stopping in the usual places like the Black Hills and Yellowstone.  We also stayed two days in Martinsdale, Montana in the Martinsdale Hotel while I collected some additional samples for Frank Dudas, a PhD student.  Martinsdale is a very small town, and the hotel wasn't actually open at that time.  But I had stayed there with Frank a year previously, so I prevailed on the owner, and she said OK.  My wife did some cooking and front desk work because the owner wasn't around much.  She also got to talking to some of the Indians, who could fish where no one else could at the reservoir.  So we had magnificent trout one night.  Afterwards the kids were in jail (the old lockup cages sitting on the main street), while we were across the street drinking with the locals in the bar.

     At the Peruvian there were so many students that some had to stay in The Fort, an appendage out in front of the Lodge built in part to absorb the brunt of any avalanches that roared down from the slope to the north and in part to house ski instructors and employees in the winter.  In the rest of my years at the Peruvian, there were fewer students and no overflow into The Fort.  The Fort decor was minimal and the ambience on the low side of "cheap college housing."  One time we couldn't find the kids.  After a prolonged search, one of the students said they were in The Fort.  My wife was horrified.  "My babies, alone in The Fort with crazy college kids!"  But they were, of course, fine, sitting in The Fort playing Uno with the college kids.  And doing rather well, actually.

     Snowbird has always had a program of summer concerts.  They are held now in a tent, but back then under a canopy on the plaza by the gondola.  We went to see the Utah Symphony in a pops concert during a heavy rainstorm.  Just as one of the pieces reached a crescendo, rain dripped onto some of the floodlights, which burst with a loud bang more-or-less in time with the tympani.

Click on the thumbnails to view the images:

 

Alumni Field Camp 1984 Photos
       
T-shirt, artwork by Keith Carlson
T-shirt back
T-shirt idea not used
T-shirt idea not used
T-shirt idea not used Lead, South Dakota Homestake Mine Homestake Mine
Group at field camp 1984 Devils Tower Shoshone River, Cody Tom lectures on Dead Indian Hill
Heart Mtn Cheryl at Heart Mtn near Evanston, Wyoming Duff relaxing at the Gun Club Quarry
Duff relaxing in the water

 

 


  

 

 Field Camp 1985

The group in the Bingham pit. Seated, l to r: Fidele, Mary, Jeff, Dave, Karen, Tom, Arthur. Kneeling: James S, Randy. Standing: Anthony, Gary (striped shirt), Mark, Lisa, Christopher (camera), Frank (blue hat), Marc, Andy (Nike), Brian (12), Dan (shiny buckle), Al, ?. Two guys in yellow hardhats in the last row, left, are Jim Taylor and Mike; the three others in that row can't be identified.  Credit: Frank Pazzaglia.  Thanks to Dan Black for some of the IDs.

Field Camp 1985

Students
In 1985 options for the Geosciences degree were the general option, biogeology, and geophysics.  The general option and biogeology required Geosc 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic year and summer Geosc 472, Field Geology.  A pre-camp cross-country excursion was available as GSc 471.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Ginette Abdo
Karen Bergmann  
Jeffrey (Jeff) Berta  
Daniel (Dan) Black  
Brian Breisinger  
Eric Brosius  
William (Bill) Brusse  
Andrew (Andy) Donnelly  
Randy Farmerie  
Fred Flint  
Mary Griffith  
Donald Hartshorn  
Gary Herbert  
Raymond Kassab  
Thomas Koch  
Arthur Lee  
Anthony Mancini  
Christopher Manga  
Deborah Mosconi  
Frank Pazzaglia  
Michael (Mike) Robertson  
Lisa Romankiew  
James Salyer  
Marc Saccarelli  
Mark Skrobacz  
James (Jim) Taylor  
Fidele Tchinda  
Paul Werner  

 

Faculty
   Duff Gold, Dave Eggler, Bill Duke, Tom Gardner

TAs
   Al Lacazette (who, as of 2008, is in Pittsburgh)

Where They Stayed
   Northwest Community College, Powell, Wyoming; Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah; Monroe Hot Springs, Utah

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Salt Lake area surficial deposits, Gun Club quarry, Marysvale volcanics, Alta overthrust, Alta stock

1985 Field Camp

Frank Pazzaglia's Memories About 1985 Field Camp

The 1985 summer field camp seemed to be plagued by endless vehicle problems, but a great group of students, staff, and faculty participated in a number of sanctioned and non-sanctioned activities that provided much comic relief.

     The vehicle problems began with a speeding ticket in Ohio on the first day out.  That was my van.  I was the driver.  I was just following Duff in his "blue-green mamba cruiser" station wagon.  He told me to slow down.  Problem was, when I did, we lost complete sight of the mamba cruiser wagon.  The radios were no help because the mamba cruiser wagon had an electrical short that prevented normal communication as we know it.  Next, in Wisconsin, Duff
Frank Pazzaglia - 1985 Field Campwas convinced that we had a bad batch of gas, because one of the vans (mine) and the mamba wagon kept cutting out at high speed.  He figured that gas filters were clogged.  So one of our in-house mechanics, Ray Kassab, took apart the gas lines of both vehicles and, using a pen, poked big holes in the gas filters.  That'll fix those filters for sure, we were certain.  Seemed to work for the mamba cruiser, but not for the van.  By South Dakota, its performance got so bad, we had to pull over and transfer everyone and everything to other vehicles, which headed on forward to the Badlands.  I stayed behind with the van, along with another one of our in-house mechanics, Mark Saccarelli.  Mark was convinced that the problem now was in the carburetor, because the big holes in the gas filters had spurted dirt throughout the gas line.  So he took the interior hood off the engine and had me begin driving down the highway as fast as the van could go.  At the same time, he took a rock hammer and "tapped" lightly on the pan of the carburetor, sure that this technique would help "blow" the dirt on through.  Unfortunately his tapping was a bit too strong, and he shattered the plastic pan, which then proceeded to spray gas all through the van and of course on the hot engine block.  That was way less than average.  Somehow, we pulled off the highway and avoided an explosion and fire. 

     This near-explosion was enough for Duff.  He forbade us to drive the van.  He went ahead to Kadoka, where a very helpful gas station attendant rebuilt the broken carburetor and returned it to the stranded van.  The van limped into the Badlands several hours later.  It was two days later, when Duff limped it into a Chrysler dealership in Rapid City, that the problem was discovered -- a clogged fuel filter way back on the gas line by the fuel tank.  Ray did not know about that one, so he could not use his trusty pen to blast a hole through it.

     That poor van was destined to suffer further.  A few days later, in the fog and rain near Cooke City, Montana, our TA, Al Lacazette (who is a story unto himself) backed the other 15 passenger van into the left, rear quarter panel Frank Pazzaglia - 1985 Field Campof the hobbled van.  That put a huge dent into it.  I've got a great picture of it in front of columnar jointed basalt at Yellowstone.  Al's description of the event to Duff was that he "touched-up" the van a bit.  Good choice of words.  Al certainly has a certain joy for life.  Everything from his multi-colored happy Converse sneakers to dining choices, one thing for certain is that you can't say that Al is a boring person.  He apparently does not care much for park rules and regulations, either.  In the driving rain, fog, and cold he climbed atop Soda Butte, in the northeast corner of Yellowstone Park, to stand on top like a modern-day Moses parting the seas.  You have to climb over the sign that says "no climbing" in order to do this.  Dr. Whu, our visiting Chinese professor, was very impressed by all of this so he climbed up too.  See the picture for proof of this.

     Never one to cry over spilled milk, Duff forged ahead, finally reaching our first base camp at Northwest Community College.  Powell had two great bars -- Grandpa-pa's and ???.  All that I remember is that one of the students, who will remain nameless, was lucky to get out of that town alive.  Mapping in Elk Basin was pretty uneventful, and "Turbo-Tommy" Gardner behaved himself for a change.  Funniest two things Tommy did the whole time were make friends and bum some smokes from a drunk Sioux in Scenic (see picture), and come up with great nicknames for everyone, the best of which was his nickname of Karen Bergmann.  That nickname will remain lost to history until we have Karen's OK to use it. 

     On to Utah -- Alta, Marysvale, then back to Alta.  Dave is right, Marysvale was really, really hot, which made staying at a hot spring not really maybe such a great idea.  But hey, who am I to argue with the staff.  Food was not good at this place, but it was calories.  There was a major run-in among cultures in Marysvale, because Jeff Berta, who does not take crap from anyone, was bunking with Fidele Tchinda, who was from the social elite in Cameroon and well, did not like to make his bed.  In fact, Fidele told Jeff that it might be a good idea if Jeff made his bed for him.  Not a good idea.  Fidele was feeling a bit under the weather in Marysvale, which might have led to his being a bit cranky.  We had to convince him that in standard English, your nose "runs" when you have a cold; it does not "leak".  Student maps were of variable quality in Marysvale, perhaps because some students chose to escape the heat by wading in the Sevier River, rather than mapping.  Good idea, except that it was a mixed-gender group that did the wading, and it was definitely a clothing-optional activity.  The names of the culprits have been withheld to protect the innocent.

     Alta mapping proceeded fine, with no major problems with the geology.  However, no matter how you slice it, it just is NOT a good idea to have a Mormon girls summer camp at the Alta Peruvian at the same time that geology boys are coming out of the field after being away from their significant others for a significant period of time.  To make matters worse, these girls brought along a trampoline.  Yes, that's right, a trampoline.  And they proceeded to jump up and down in their bathing suits on this damn trampoline while we were supposed to be drafting maps in the late afternoon and early evening.  Enough was enough after a while, and we decided to engage these young ladies in a friendly game of two-hand touch football.  The emphasis of the game quickly devolved into the whole "two-hand touch" thing, which forced Dave to break the game up after he too, inadvertently, found himself engaged in non-recommended touching.  Good job, Dave.  We were angry with you then for breaking the game up, but we are older, wiser, and not in jail because of you.

     The other very interesting thing to happen in Alta was that one group -- Fred Flint and Art Lee -- was a bit dysfunctional.  In fact, one day they ended up pretty well separated.  Fred started calling for Art when he got stuck on a cliff face, convinced that he could not lower himself down.  Art came to the rescue and also to the conclusion that Fred could not lower himself down.  So Art told him to "hang in there" and he ran for help.  He headed back to the lodge where he called for emergency help.  In no time at all, there were sirens blaring everywhere as fire trucks and EMTs and all kinds of helpful people showed up to get Fred down.  In the meantime, I am pretty certain Fred found a way to get down by himself.  Duff spent the rest of the evening trying to convince the rescue squads not to bill field camp for their appreciated, but unnecessary, efforts.

     Anyway, these are some of the amusing things I remember from camp in the summer of 1985.  Other campers from that year should add to, or correct, any inaccuracies I report.

Dave Eggler's Memories About 1985 Field Camp

Dave Eggler - 1985 Field CampI started teaching field camp in 1984, but I only did the stock exercise.  In 1985 I did Marysvale, part of the Alta overthrust exercise, and the Alta Stock.  I arrived in Salt Lake City by air and almost immediately left with the group for Marysvale.  Part of my luggage arrived after our departure, so Bill Brusse kindly loaned me his sneakers, which I wore for the exercise.  This was the hottest year of the many that I spent at Marysvale.  At the end of the last field day, I was ready to drink anything, including radiator water.  Fortunately, more palatable beverages were available fifteen miles away at camp in Monroe.  I remember wonderful scones and relishes served at Monroe, which obliterate any memory of the other food.  I also remember numerous vehicle breakdowns, to which Frank and his mechanical friends applied their considerable automotive skills.

     Frank's narrative reminds me of Arthur Lee and the many Arthur Lee stories.  One is that he was constantly losing his field book.  Once, on the overthrust project, I observed him wandering around without map, field book, or partner.  Some probing revealed that his partner and the map were at least in the vicinity.  He was reminded to stay with his partner.  His field book, it seems, had disappeared the previous day.  I asked when he had last seen it.  He had last seen it on the outcrop of Tintic-like Mineral Forks just below the Alta-Snowbird road (that outcrop now lies below a heliport).  I drove him there, and it took me only two minutes to find the field book, along with several pencils.  Another time I wanted to find Arthur.  Some classmates told me to check the Alta Lodge, which is up the road from the Peruvian where we stayed, and which no one should have had an occasion to visit.  The staff at the Alta Lodge knew Arthur very well: he came in every morning and leisurely had a coffee and pastry!  When confronted, Arthur said, oh yeah, he went in there to get more pencils. 

     A couple corrections on Frank's story of the high school girls.  I think it was a high school retreat, although the participants were probably Mormon.  I think it was both boys and girls, but who remembers the boys?

     I remember a very pleasant and lengthy brunch at The Rustler with the Brusses, and several spirited games of Trivial Pursuit in the Peruvian lounge area.  And I remember looking at Frank's pictures of Italian festivals and parades in his hometown in Pennsylvania and his enthusiasm for those traditions.  I know that continues today, as he revisits his hometown in Italy.  And of course we kidded him about his beloved Yankees, who weren't doing so well in those years.  I also remember that Andy Donnelly left immediately after camp for a family vacation in Pago Pago, which, according to him, is pronounced Pongo Pongo.  That engendered a certain number of jokes.

     I went back with the vans and the crew across the country to Pennsylvania for the first time in 1985.  I did this for 18 or 19 of the 20 years I did field camp.  Sometimes I thought it was my real role.  No side trips to Canada on my watch.  I remember a campaign of hand-lettered signs flashed at passing Nebraska football fans, in Nebraska, because Penn State had defeated Nebraska a couple of years previously (see the photo).  I also remember that Fidele examined every trinket in every convenience store every time we stopped for gas and had to be pushed out of every store and back into a van.  And, as for every year thereafter, I remember very little that happened between Missouri and Pennsylvania.

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge: (thanks to Frank Pazzaglia for most of the photos)

 

Alumni Field Camp 1985 Photos
       
Van Hise's Rock, Wisconsin
Barbican, Wisconsin
 
camp
Duff atop Heart Mtn More atop Heart Mtn Eric and Lisa atop Heart Mtn Tired after the Heart Mtn hike
Big Al and Dr Whu at Soda Butte Group at Soda Butte Dented van at Tower Falls Devils Tower
Earthquake Lake Warfield fossil fish quarry Gun Club Quarry, SLC Fidele at the Stillwater
Closeup of quarry photo Swimming in kettle lake closeup Mapping hard on the last day
Alta Peruvian Lodge, last evening trip home, making friends in Nebraska

 

 

 

 

 

 1986 Penn State Geosciences Field Camp group

Group at Fanshawe Lodge, YBRA.  Bottom row: Tom, John Repella, Dennis (WVU student), Duff. 2nd row: Rudy, Don, Tim, Phil. 3rd row: Laurie (behind Don), Bob Bristol (behind Phil). 4th row: Steve, Diane, Melissa. 5th row: Sonya, John Eckman, Becky. Top row: Steve, Drew, Bob Breakwell, Bob Rickard, Mark.  Credit: Rudy Slingerland. Thanks to Becky for the IDs.

Field Camp 1986

Students
In 1986 options for the Geosciences degree were the general option, biogeology, and geophysics.  The general option and biogeology required Geosc 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic year and summer Geosc 472, Field Geology.  A pre-camp cross-country excursion was available as GSc 471.

Attendee List
Name Contact
Robert Breakwell  
Robert Bristol  
Thomas Cumello  
Diane Dopkin  
John Eckman  
Drew Grove  
Rebecca (Becky) Jaquish Jones  
Timothy Kelly  
Laurie Kreps  
Stephen Levis  
Phillip McKalips  
John Repella  
Robert Rickard  
Dennis Roman  
Sonya Shah  
Steven Suder  
Donald Watkins  
Mark Wolfram  
Melissa Woycio  

 

 

Faculty
   Tom Gardner, Duff Gold, Dave Eggler, Rudy Slingerland

TAs
   Matt McMackin, Chris Shuman

Where They Stayed
   YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana; Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah; Monroe Hot Springs, Utah

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Rosebud, Salt Lake area surficial deposits, Gun Club quarry, Marysvale volcanics, Alta overthrust, Alta stock

1986 Field Camp

1986 Penn State Geosciences Field Camp

The Twister shown on the T-shirt really happened.  The vans had parked, as usual, below the steep east face of the cinder cone, with associated lava flows, on the eastern edge of the Black Rocks field in central Utah.  Without warning, a small dust devil or twister came from the west over the cinder cone and then over the vans.  Every loose paper in the vans was swept upward and eastward.  Then a rain of ash and cinders commenced.  Some students ran into the vans, some covered their heads with map cases and crouched, and others tried to stick their heads under the van wheel wells.  Afterwards an inch of ash and cinders had to be swept out of the vans.

Becky Jaquish Jones - 1986 Field CampBecky Jaquish Jones (June 2006): "Thanks so much for putting this website together.  I found out about this website from folks at work (Rob Lux, Steve Urbanik - field camp 1983 or so). There is quite a community of PSU geologists who have either passed through or still work at the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.  In fact, I am going to Gil Oudijk's wedding in Brazil next month.  If you remember Gil, I'm sure that you'll remember that there's a story to that!  Thanks again for the memories!"
     Becky adds (2007) that "I can definitely tell you that I worked much harder in the Geosciences program than I ever did getting my MBA [at Rutgers]. I also remember that one of the grad students, who went to Columbia for undergrad and was in some of my 400 level classes, couldn't believe how hard we had to work as undergraduates. At the time, I just looked at him like he was from Mars, not knowing any different from anywhere else (except for that summer camp that's called the YBRA Field Camp). We undergrads didn't realize how hard or comprehensive the program was at the time, because we had nothing to compare it to, but I can tell you that it was really good preparation for having to think your way through problems.  Thanks!"

Click on the images to enlarge: (thanks to Becky Jaquish Jones for most of these images, and most of the captions)

 

Alumni Field Camp 1986 Photos
       
T-shirt
T-shirt back
We ARE... Penn State!
Duff lectures at Van Hise's Rock
Don't jump. It's only field camp! Tom and Rudy look serious OK it's another waterfall -- where's the bar? boulders at Pipestone
Laurie, Steve, TC, Melissa, and GSci Joe at the Missouri River overlook. Melissa showing off her new hiking boots! Badlands Diane and TC experience a rare inch of rain in the Badlands.
When it rains in the Badlands, we "camp" in the Black Hills. Even the camera lens was wet   Duff & Tom at YBRA
Jackson Lake, Tetons. Could be John Repella doing the splashing. Dining out at the Alta Peruvian Duff's in the lead Phil's zoned out
Steve and TC in Alta Cannonball! at the Peruvian

 

 

 Field Camp 1997

At the bottom of the Bingham Pit, in quartz monzonite porphyry. Front: Chris; 2nd row: Marty, Dave F, Kathy, George, Dave M, Nan; Back: John, Kjell

Field Camp 1987

Students
In 1987 options for the Geosciences degree were the general option, biogeology, and geophysics.  The general option and biogeology required Geosc 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic year and summer Geosc 472, Field Geology.  A pre-camp cross-country excursion was available as GSc 471.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Nan Crystal Arens  
David Funk  
Kjell Grotland  
Marty Gilgallon  
Chris Kern  
David McMillan  
John Michael  
George Schuman  
Kathy West  

 

     

Faculty
   Bill Duke, Dave Eggler

TA
   John Barry

Where They Stayed
   YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana; U of U, Salt Lake City; Alta Lodge, Alta, Utah; Monroe Hot Springs, Utah

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Rosebud, Salt Lake area surficial deposits, Gun Club quarry, Alta overthrust, Alta stock, Marysvale volcanics

1987 Field Camp

The 1987 Penn State Field Camp
Dave Eggler

Duff was on sabbatical in 1987, and so I was in charge of arrangements and logistics for field camp.  John Barry took Dave Egglerthe one and only maxivan, dubbed Geobeast, with the students arrayed neatly (?) inside, on the cross-country trip to Montana.  Bill Duke taught at YBRA and on the trip down to Utah, and at the U of U dorms for the Gun Club exercise.  Bill hadn't done the Elk Basin exercise before, but Dr. Foose pronounced their maps to be excellent, so they must have been excellent. The overall map, upside down, is actually on the T-shirt!

     I arrived in SLC about the time that Bill backed the van into a loading dock, rearranging the rear bumper (see the picture), and about the time that Kjell ran about 12 hours overtime on his Gun Club report.  His stream-of-consciousness, ever-recircling style of writing knew no time constraints.  (I also read the best reports in my 20 years of field camp that summer.  Nan, a former Collegian editor, wrote precise reports that were comprehensive without being lengthy.  My written insructions said that the geologic history should "tell a story."  She really did tell a story.)

     After a field review of the Gun Club quarry, we headed up Little Cottonwood Canyon for the Alta overthrust and Alta stock exercises that I led.  The Peruvian more-or-less didn't want us that summer, so we struck a deal, along with the University of Utah, to use the Alta Lodge.  The per-day rate was more than it had been at the Peruvian, but we were served semi-gourmet meals.  No outdoor pool, but we had a volleyball court and an indoor hot tub.

     That summer I began the Alta reconnaissance project.  I thought we ought to see "the rest of the stock," especially because the country above Brighton is spectacular with all its lakes.  Besides, the trail more-or-less follows the stock contact.  So we went over Catherine Pass, around Lakes Mary and Martha, and came back over the pass above Twin Lakes into Grizzly Gulch.  We moved around as a group.  When we reached the Peruvian, however, John Michael was not with us.  Woops.... Dave McMillan was a collegiate runner, and I was in pretty good running shape, so we put on running shoes and took off on the route again, running most of it.  It grew dark, and we called out forlornly, again and again, for John Michael.  We eventually arrived back in Alta to find John Michael!  When he had realized we were not with him, he headed downhill to Brighton and hitchhiked through SLC and back up Little Cottonwood.

     One day during the stock project, I started walking back into Alta to do some grading.  I had gone about a mile when an afternoon storm swept up the canyon.  These are common in the mountains but are usually over in 20 or 30 minutes.  So I huddled under my poncho to wait it out.  This storm was particularly fierce with thunder and then lightning.  The temperature dropped noticeably, and it began to hail.  The hailstones were so large that I stuck my map case over my head, under the poncho, to protect myself.  When the storm finally subsided, I debated whether to continue on into Alta or to go back up the mountain to check on the troops.  I trudged back up the trail.  I found that all the groups had congregated into one short adit that miners had punched into a contact skarn just off the Twin Lakes Pass trail.  They were crowded but only slightly damp.  The trouble was that half the skarn was a garnet-diopside skarn but the other half a serpentine-magnetite skarn.  A magnetite-rich skarn near the top of a hill is not a good place to wait out a lightning storm!  I told this story the rest of my years teaching in the area.

     John Barry was Irish, and he had everyone following the Tour de France throughout our two-week stay in Alta; the Tour was won by the Irishman he was following.

     That summer I moved the Marysvale project to the end of camp, where it stayed until its demise.  Coming back one day from Marysvale to Monroe the "back way," a bumpy and dusty ride that I really liked, for some reason, we encountered students at Teapot Dome.  They turned out to be the Weber State field school, and all four students, three men and one woman, and their prof fit neatly (?) into his Volvo.  We kept running into them for the rest of our time there.  The last mapping day at Marysvale, John Barry and I sat in the van grading papers and maps.  The doors were open, and the overhead light was on.  That should not have caused any power loss, but when the students returned, the van would not start.  It was on top of a hill, but being an automatic, we couldn't jump-start the engine.  We also had no power brakes.  So I had the students walk a ways, and I stomped on the brake pedal and let the van roll downhill to more level ground.  We then pushed the van several miles toward the town of Marysvale until a passing pickup with jumper cables got us going.  I usually bought the students some cool drinks on the last day of mapping, but that day they really earned them.

     Dave and I ran the first annual Monroe 10K.  We stopped the van, on that back route to Monroe, 10K from town, changed into running gear, and the two of us ran into town.  The first mile or so was downhill, which helped.  But the temperatures in the high nineties got to me, and he faded into the distance.  I really limped when I encountered the hot, humid air of irrigated fields in the valley bottom.  But I persevered, and he came back and met me, and we jogged into camp.  He and I did the Monroe 10K once more the next year when he was TA.

     Most Utah towns celebrate a "second 4th of July" at Pioneer Days, commemorating the day Brigham Young and the pioneers crossed the Wasatch and saw Salt Lake valley.  Marysvale never was more than a very small town, even during its heyday in the 1950s uranium boom.  But as we drove through town on that day, our progress was impeded by its Pioneer Days parade.  It consisted of a few floats on wagons behind tractors or pickups, some veterans, and even kids in wagons.  As one float rounded a corner, it became unhitched, and our guys came to the rescue.  That night Monroe had its fireworks display behind the high school, which was right next to the Monroe Hot Springs campground.  The fire company was in charge.  I saw several of these displays in Monroe over the years, and I enjoyed them more than the big pyrotechnics in State College.  More than once, shells didn't go where they were supposed to and came directly back to earth on top of the firemen, who scattered in all directions.

     I had the students turn in their reports at noon, but we didn't leave until the next morning.  (In future years we left after lunch, sleeping that night at Dillon Lake in Colorado.)  So we were free to party a little (see the pool pictures).  I bought a few bottles of champagne.  At lunch John Barry constructed a pyramid of champagne glasses, such that champagne was poured into the top glass and cascaded downwards to fill all the glasses, as in the picture.  Quite a show.  I carried on that tradition for a few years afterwards.

     The 1987 class was a small but a close-knit and supporting group. Everyone deserved an A.  In retrospect, this was my favorite field camp group.

Click on the thumbnails to view the image: (thanks to Chris Kern for most of these)

 

Alumni Field Camp 1987 Photos
       
T-shirt
T-shirt back
Good fire, maybe a good story
Geobeast, with a damaged rear bumper
Geobeast with a geoflat Gun Club quarry Gun Club quarry Bill Duke, photographer at Gun Club
group at Gun Club parking lot, U of U, packing for trip up the canyon Packing at the U of U for trip to Alta Group in the Bingham pit
Lodge at Alta Lodge at Alta George at the Alta overthrust exercise Nan at the Alta overthrust exercise
John Barry at Alta, extending the wallrock Chris hoists pumice at Black Rocks Lunch on the Marysvale exercise Storm! Marysvale
Dave surveys the troops at a trail cut, Marysvale Group at the Monroe Hot Springs Monroe Hot Springs pool Dave E at Monroe Hot Springs
Marty, John B, Coors4 Last lunch, Monroe Vintage '86? '87? The inaugural champagne tower, last lunch
Packing to leave Monroe Monroe Hot Springs, packing to go home Dave McMillan prepares to leave field camp Kathy, John B, Nan
Dave E & John M, trip home

 

 

 Field Camp 1988

Cheryl, Steve, Mark, Nick (behind), Pete, Ron (behind sign), Paul (with camera), Eva, Dave M, Brooks, Tina

Field Camp 1988

Students
In 1988 options for the Geosciences degree were the general option, biogeology, and geophysics.  The general option and biogeology required Geosc 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic year and summer Geosc 472, Field Geology.  A pre-camp cross-country excursion was available as Geosc 471.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact 
Christina (Tina) Allen  
Peter Chronowski  
Brooks Clark  
Mark Fenoglio  
Nick Kiusalaas  
Paul LeClerc  
Eva Marchione  
Steve Raymond  
Cheryl Shipp  
Ron Thorp  

Faculty
   Duff Gold, Dave Eggler

TA
   Dave McMillan

Where They Stayed
   YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana; U of U, Salt Lake City; Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah; Monroe Hot Springs, Utah

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Rosebud, Salt Lake area surficial deposits, Gun Club quarry, Alta overthrust, Alta stock, Marysvale volcanics

Click on the thumbnails to view the images:

 

Alumni Field Camp 1988 Photos
       
T-shirt
T-shirt back
DuPage County, Illinois landfill
Pipestone, Minnesota
Badlands   Beartooth highway Beartooth Pass
Tetons Warfield Springs Warfield Springs

 

 


 

 

 

 Field Camp 1989

Group at Yellowstone Falls. Front: Nancy, Bob, Tom, Sherri; Middle: Andrew, Jay, Susan, Stephen, Doc; Back: Joe, Glenda, Jim, Andy Sicree, Dale

Field Camp 1989

Students
In 1989 options for the Geosciences degree were the general option, biogeology, and geophysics.  The general option and biogeology required Geosc 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic year and summer Geosc 472, Field Geology.  A pre-camp cross-country excursion was available as Geosc 471.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact 
Glenda Benner  
Kevin (Doc) Hoover  
Susan King  
Robert Klugiewicz  
Joseph Kulak  
Jim Llewellyn  
Stephen Mitchell  
Andrew Sicree  
Nancy Guidos Snyder  
Andrew Sokol  
Jay Taylor  
Thomas Waddington  
Sherri Zendri  

 Faculty

   Duff Gold, Dave Eggler

TA
   Dale Beeson

Where They Stayed
   YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana; U of U, Salt Lake City; Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah; Monroe Hot Springs, Utah

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Rosebud, Salt Lake area surficial deposits, Gun Club quarry, Alta overthrust, Alta stock, Marysvale volcanics

The P and S beside the U: Every town in Utah and Idaho boasts a collection of white-painted rocks on the hill above town that spell out the name of the local high school or college.  So it is that a giant U appears in the foothills above the University of Utah.  This year field campers cornered the market on paper towels.  In the early hours they ascended the hill and put down enough towel sheets, anchored by rocks, to form a spidery P and S in front of the U (see photo below).  The letters were filmed by a helicopter crew and featured on the morning news, but no one apparently knew what they meant!

Click on the thumbnails to view the image:

 

Alumni Field Camp 1989 Photos
       
T-shirt. Artwork by Doc Hoover
T-shirt back
Silvergate (Heart Mtn detachment)
Warfield Springs
The PSU Brighton Utah Prince of Wales mine Twin Lakes Pass
Twin Lakes Pass Twin Lakes Pass Monroe campground Marysvale
Marysvale Sevier River, Marysvale Sevier River, Marysvale Breakdown in Iowa City

 

 

 

 

 Penn State Geosciences Field Camp Group 1990

In front of the Alta Peruvian Lodge. Top row: Tom, Doc, Mike, Adam, Erik, Dave, Mark W. Middle row: Mark E, Sue, Barb (behind), Joe, Muatasam, Dan, Yoko. Bottom row: Sharon, Seth, Greg. Credit: Joe Pyle

Field Camp 1990

Students
In 1990 options for the Geosciences degree were the general option, biogeology, and geophysics.  The general option and biogeology required Geosc 470, Introduction to Field Geology, during the academic year and summer Geosc 472, Field Geology.  A pre-camp cross-country excursion was available as Geosc 471.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact 
Muatasam "Matt" Al-Raisi  
Susan Altman  
Tom Colozzo  
Mark S Elson  
Yoko Furukawa (PhD '94)  
Erik Hinsman  
Tetsuya Kato "Mr. T"  
Barbara Marin  
Seth Narehood  
Joseph Pyle  
Gregory Ronczka  
Sharon Scanlon Minchak  
Michael Taraszki  
Dan Vanderheiden  
Adam Weaver  
Mark Williams  

Faculty
   Duff Gold, Dave Eggler

TA
   Kevin (Doc) Hoover

Where They Stayed
   YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana; U of U, Salt Lake City; Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah; Monroe Hot Springs, Utah

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Rosebud, Salt Lake area surficial deposits, Gun Club quarry, Alta overthrust, Alta stock, Marysvale volcanics

Some of Dave Eggler and Doc Hoover's "Silly Awards"
   Joe: The Ronald Reagan Award -- smiling no matter what, AND The Trivial Pursuit Award -- a mind filled with useless clutter
   Dan: LaZBoy Award -- for sleeping in a chair
   Erik: The Avis Award -- the Alps are #1, but he settled for the Rockies
   Yoko: The Brunswick Award -- acting like a human bowling ball when rolling downhill
   Muatasam: The "Gipper" Award -- for collecting the best nickname -- Montage of the Middle Ophir
   Sharon: The AT&T Let Your Fingers Do The Walking Award -- for obvious reasons, AND The Sealy Perfect Sleeper Award -- again for obvious reasons
   Mark W: The Greyhound Award -- most likely to join Yoko on a bus out of Richfield
   Mark E: The Flagstaff Award for heroically entering that mine when completely hung over
   Tom: The Army-Navy Award -- a wardrobe straight from the Combat Zone
   Seth: The Lost Sheep Award -- for bleating sadly when lost on numerous occasions
   Mike: Another Serta Perfect Sleeper Award, again for obvious reasons
   Sue: The Mad Max Award and The Smoky and the Bandit Award -- most likely to raise car insurance in Wyoming
   Adam: The Leroy Award -- for laboriously drafting all maps with a Leroy set and still having time (barely) to write reports
   Greg: Dr. Scholl Award -- for putting his foot in his mouth numerous times
   Duff: "Suds McKenzie" Award for barely consuming flat, stale, month-old keg beer
   Doc: The Stephen King Award for collecting things too weird to mention out loud

Click here to read comments on the 1990 field camp

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images: (thanks to Joe Pyle for the photos)

 

Alumni Field Camp 1990 Photos
       
T-shirt. Artwork by Doc Hoover
T-shirt back
Wall Drug, South Dakota. "Lookee, Maw, new cowboy hats!"
 
Tent city, Thermopolis, Wyoming Duff at Powder River Pass Doc Hoover, YBRA Cubic (or hexagonal?) closest packing, Yellowstone
Bad times in Little Cottonwood Canyon "anger on the outcrop," or "slickenside schismatics," Albion Basin, Alta, Utah

 

 

 

 

 Field Camp 1991

Skarn at Alta. Front: Mark, Joe A; 2nd row: Mouza, Dave, Joe D; 3rd row: Scott N, Beth, Scott L, Phil, Gary, Kurt, Tanja

Field Camp 1991

Students
In 1991 the Geosciences curriculum changed yet again.  Among those changes, Geosc 470, Introduction to Field Geology, was no longer required for the Geosciences degree.  Geosc 470 continued for Earth Science students and others until 2004.  But Geosc 472, Field Geology, was required, and Geosc 471 was again offered as a pre-camp cross-country excursion.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact 
Mouza Al-Marhoobi  
Joe Andrew  
Beth Carson  
Gary Daub  
Joe DeWalle  
Kurt Fritz  
Phil Gray  
Tanja Leggett  
Scott Lookingbill  
Scott Nowicki  
Mark R Stephens  

 

 

Faculty
   Duff Gold, Dave Eggler

TAs
   Kevin (Doc) Hoover, Arnold Doden, Mark Moats

Where They Stayed
   YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana; U of U, Salt Lake City; Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah; Richfield, Utah

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Rosebud, Salt Lake area surficial deposits, Gun Club quarry, Alta overthrust, Alta stock, Marysvale volcanics

Dave Eggler's "Silly Awards"
   Joe D: The No-Doz Award
   Scott L: The "Well Done" Award from the Hawaiian Tanning Lotion Company
   Mouza: The You're-Talking-Too-Loud Award
   Tanja: Mighty Mouth Award
   Scott N: Flower Power Award
   Gary: Can-You-Keep-Him-Down-on-the-Farm After-He's-Seen-Utah Award
   Mark S: Driver of The Year Award
   Beth: The "You're A What?" Award
   Kurt: The "Missing Link" Award from the Utah Cattlemen's Association
   Phil: The Seagram's Seven Award
   Joe A: The Semi-Artistic T-Shirt of the Year Award

Click on the thumbnails to view the image:

 

Alumni Field Camp 1991 Photos
       
T-shirt. Artwork by Doc Hoover
Back of T-shirt
Beartooth Butte
Beartooth Pass
Mountain View, Stillwater YBRA Tower Falls Hebgen Lake
Alta stock Alta stock Bingham Mine pit Bingham

 

 

 Field Camp 1992

Field Camp 1992

Students
Field course offerings in 1992 were Geosc 471, the pre-camp cross-country excursion, and Geosc 472, Field Geology.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Matt Bennett  
Jeff Bologa  
Kate Burkett  
Jason Fegel  
Shana Gordon Tritsch  
Mike Krott  
Kirsten Laarkamp  
Tom Maher  
Theresa Miller-Kleiner  
Jennifer Mullen  
Joann Simmons  
Matthew Snyder  
Steven VanDorpe  

 

 

Faculty
   Duff Gold, Dave Eggler

TAs
   Kevin (Doc) Hoover, Arnold Doden, Simon Poulson, Mark Moats

Where They Stayed
   YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana; U of U, Salt Lake City; Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah; Richfield, Utah

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Rosebud, Salt Lake area surficial deposits, Gun Club quarry, Alta overthrust, Alta stock, Marysvale volcanics

Some of Dave Eggler's "Silly Awards"
   Jen: The U.S. Postal Service Most Unvalued Customer Award for sending home the heaviest boxes of rocks
   Shana: Utah Dept. of Commerce Award for devotion to Utah tourism above and beyond the call of duty for considering staying in the Richfield KOA for three additional days
   Jeff: David Attenborough Award for Wildlife Investigation for his attempt to catch a Sasquatch with cold hot dogs and vodka
   Lee: The Eisenhower Federal Interstate System Award for providing the truck that created the Minter Memorial Highway on a hillslope in Marysvale, which should be there for at least the next 20 years
   Kate: The Mother Teresa Humanitarian Award for putting up with Bologa for 8 weeks
   Matt B: The Extreme Beach Boy Wannabee Award for being (a) 1000 miles from the nearest surf and (b) six months from summer
   Mike: The Julia Childs Good Gastronome Award for disservices to food and to dining
   Kirsten: The William Safire Language Award for the most expletives when least expected
   Joann: The Coppertone UV Protection Award for getting the fewest tan lines
   Steve: The Isaac Newton Apple Award for proving consistently that gravity still works
   Matt S: Forever Young Award -- red cars, volleyball, loud music, and young women
   Jason: The Calvin Klein Award for wearing toy gaiters under the most extreme conditions
   Tom: Appalachian Outdoor Kelty Pack Award for always carrying large objects around in the field

Click on the thumbnails to view the image:

 

Alumni Field Camp 1992 Photos
       
Blackwell Forest
Van Hise's Rock
Barbican
Pipestone
Badlands Badlands Badlands Badlands
  White Elephant Mine Devils Tower Wyodak Coal Mine
Tensleep Pass Rosebud Belfry MT

 

 


    

 

 Field Camp 1993

Flagstaff Peak, Alta, Utah. Credit: Frank Pazzaglia

Field Camp 1993

Students
Field course offerings in 1993 were Geosc 471, the pre-camp cross-country excursion, and Geosc 472, Field Geology.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact 
Mike Appleby  
Jennifer DeLurio  
Joe Dzvonik  
Tom Gebbie  
Andy Hoover  
Jason Lynch  
Steve Nelson  
Trish Newdeck  
Dan Ombalski  
Steve Petsch  
Ben Pursell  
Geoff Rawling  
Scott Robinson  
Eric Rufe  
Jamie Shallenberger  
Scott Snyder  
Greg Symons  
Brett Wambold  
Shep Winckler  
Marc Zeisloft  

 

Faculty
  
Duff Gold, Dave Eggler

TAs
   Kevin (Doc) Hoover, Frank Pazzaglia, Barbara Marin, Shana Gordon Tritsch

Where They Stayed
   YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana; U of U, Salt Lake City; Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah; Richfield, Utah

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Little Bear Creek, Rosebud, Salt Lake area surficial deposits, Gun Club quarry, Alta overthrust, Alta stock, Marysvale volcanics

Some of Dave Eggler's "Silly Awards"
   Geoff: The Dave Eggler Dry Humor Award -- always ready with a cynical response
   Trish: Dedication Award -- wish we could buy you a car, but you get Brett & Jamie instead!
   Jason: TA "Brown"-Nosing Award
   Mike: Most Likely Convert to Mormonism -- nice, blonde hair, might enjoy three wives
   Jennifer: Alf Engen Award -- best parallel skiing off Cardiff Peak
   Joe: Experimental Physics Award -- a living experiment in black-body radiation
   Tom: The Human Thermostat -- "air on," "air off"
   Andy: The Calgary Stampede Award -- "Hey, Steve, can cows climb?"
   Dan: The Who Dan Award for allegedly being attacked by an owl.  But who knows? After all, it's Dan.
   Steve P: A Stephen Sondheim Award for show tunes far, far, far off-Broadway
   Ben: "Clothes Optional" Award, especially when beer's involved
   Scott R: "Is this an A?" "Is this a hottub?"
   Eric: Trivial Pursuit Award for best recall of trivia, unless they involve geology
   Jamie: "Shoes?"
   Scott S: Library of Congress Reference Award -- "But this is all common knowledge"
   Greg: The Zip Code Award -- up to four postcards a day
   Brett: G-String Award -- for most obscene shorts
   Marc: Kindercare Award

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images: (thanks to Frank Pazzaglia for some of the photos)

 

Alumni Field Camp 1993 Photos
       
T-shirt
T-shirt back
DuPage County, IL landfill
Van Hise's Rock, Wisconsin
Baraboo, Wisconsin Barbican Pipestone, MN Badlands
  Homestake Mine Mt Rushmore Devils Tower
Thermopolis Tensleep Canyon, Wyoming Powder River Pass Powder River Pass
Granite Pass, Beartooth Highway Beartooth Race The Bat, Belfry, MT Stillwater Complex
Duff's birthday at YBRA YBRA Gros Ventre landslide area Shana in Warfield Springs quarry
Monroe Quarry, Wasatch fault Gilbert delta, SLC area Frank shows glacial features in Little Cottonwood Canyon  yes, but it's only dirt! Frank on the White Pine Slide, Little Cottonwood
Frank and Sarah

 

 

 


  

 

 Field Camp 1994

Field Camp 1994

Students
Field course offerings in 1994 were Geosc 471, the pre-camp cross-country excursion, and Geosc 472, Field Geology.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact 
Scott Anderson  
Matt Canning  
Michael Chilek  
Erik de Roos  
Kate Goehrig  
Robert Green  
David Harp  
Beth Hills  
A J Kondas  
Ed Linkewich  
Linda Mark  
Brian McGeehan  
Eric Ober  
Frank Romeo  
Dean Slonaker  
Anthony Sundie  
Michael Trudnak  
Krista Walter  
Doug Whitmire  
Greg Woods  
Tom Wyland  
John Zahradnik  

 

Faculty
  
Duff Gold, Dave Eggler

TAs
   Kevin (Doc) Hoover, Mark Moats, Mike Appleby, Gale Blackmer, Paul Zell

Where They Stayed
   YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana; U of U, Salt Lake City; Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah; Richfield, Utah

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Rosebud, Salt Lake area surficial deposits, Gun Club quarry, Alta overthrust, Alta stock, Marysvale volcanics

Some of Dave Eggler and Doc Hoover's "Silly Awards"
   Matt M: most interesting use of English
   Linda: The Wyoming Vegetable Ranchers Award
   Krista: Count Dracula Award for most blood shed
   Mike C: Elmer Fudd Award for killing the wabbit
   Beth: Home Alone in Jackson
   Dave: Soldier of Fortune Award for best-dressed geologist
   Matt C: Paul Abdul Award for unique movements in the field and best dance on an outcrop
   Kate: Most likely to climb K2
   A J: Postal Worker Award -- this man should be denied a permit to carry a gun
   Brian: The Metric Award for always being one mm off
   Eric O: We admire how he sleeps without a tent, but we suggest he keep his mouth shut at night
   Frank: he's a Romeo, but he attracts more rocks than women
   Tony: Elder Statesman Award -- perhaps the first 12th semester student to attend field camp
   Mike T: Hackisack Award for hackin, hackin, hackin
   Doug: Mr. Reverse
   Woody: Benedict Arnold Award -- he abandoned Dean the first day out
   Tom: Flash-Back Sixties Geohippie Award


Click on the thumbnails to enlarge:

 

Alumni Field Camp 1994 Photos
       
 
Mt Rushmore  Mike A, Paul Z, Doc, Mark M
Wyodak coal mine
Wind River Canyon
Wind River Canyon Bighorn Mtns Mountain View, Stillwater Nye, Stillwater
Doc's exploding garbage at YBRA camp Yellowstone Falls Yellowstone Natl Park
Warfield Springs fish quarry

 

 

 Field Camp 1995

Group at the Tetons

Field Camp 1995

Students
Field course offerings in 1995 were Geosc 471, the pre-camp cross-country excursion, and Geosc 472, Field Geology.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact 
Peter Adams   
Jennifer Babb  
Susan Bilek  
Josh Borella  
Emily Constantine Mercurio  
Monique Croteau  
Chris Duerr  
Jennifer Farrell  
Andrew Fetterman  
Sean Gaffney  
Stacey Geyer  
Tiffani Heil  
Nate Kaleta  
Joseph Krothe  
Adam Locke  
Chris McCann  
Paul Pinkerton  
Gretchen Price Shub  
Ryan Sincavage  
Andrea Smith  
Glenn Spinelli  
Rich Sucher  
Blair Tormey  
Carmen Vito  
Heather Walaitis  
Micah Weltner  
Mike Wyatt  
Kosei Yamaguchi  
Jennifer Zuck Duerr  

 

Faculty
  
Duff Gold, Dave Eggler

TAs
   Linda Mark, Tom Wyland, Kevin (Doc) Hoover, Gale Blackmer, Robin Mock

Where They Stayed
   YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana; U of U, Salt Lake City; Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah; Richfield, Utah

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Rosebud, Salt Lake area surficial deposits, Gun Club quarry, Alta overthrust, Alta stock, Marysvale volcanics

1995 Field Camp Group Photo

Some comments from the 1995 class

Emily Constantine MercurioEmily Constantine Mercurio (2006): "I have an interesting story for you!  Matt Mercurio (who was in field camp in 1994) and I got married in 2003 and had our first daughter a year ago -- we named her Alta. The name came from Alta, Utah, of course and also because it was my great-grandmother's name. Picture attached [see the image gallery]. Thought the field camp/Alta study area alums might be interested in this tidbit!
     Matt and I have many great memories of Igneous Petrology that we discuss regularly.... I got my M.S. from Michigan Tech in 1998, and I've been working since then but I want to continue my studies and volcano research.
     We have another baby due in October -- maybe we'll name he/she Red Lodge!"


Joe Krothe (2007): "I stumbled on the website and wanted to thank you for putting it together. I have so many fond memories of wandering the west that summer and the site helped bring some of those back.
     I graduated from Penn State in December 1996 and moved to Houston, Texas the following July. I have been in Texas ever since. I can't say I am using my degree everyday, but I certainly have many great memories of my days in Happy Valley and the classmates I had. I currently work as a commodities broker in a small company called IVG Energy. I have been married for 4 years and had a new baby girl in April (our first)."

Sean GaffeySean Gaffey (2007): "Since leaving PSU I've spent most of my time in Colorado.  I moved here in 1997 and worked in the civil /geological engineering industry for a while.  In 2001, I began working for the Colorado Geological Survey.  I moved back to PA for two years, met my wife and we now have a son, Liam.  We made the decision in 2006 to move back to Colorado.  We now live in Parker, CO and I resumed my position with the CGS.  I study geological hazards within Colorado as they impact proposed land use and existing infrastructure.  As part of this, I monitor several landslide / rockfall hazard areas along Interstate 70.
     I made it back to Alta, UT in 2001, with Ryan Sincavage, to go skiing.  We drive eight hours from Denver to arrive at the end of a 110" early season storm.  I had a great time skiing the basin and reminisced about what a great experience the summer of 1995 was.  It was great fun to see "Duff's Bench" in the lobby of the Peruvian.   This summer I met with the PSU field camp as they passed through CO on their way to UT.  I was able to meet up with them for a tour of Dinosaur Ridge and a caravan through the Rockies.... 
    I attached a photo of Liam and me on Mt. Evans taken this summer, and another at Colorado National Monument, last autumn."

Some of Dave Eggler's "Silly Awards"
   Jen F: The Mean Sea Level Award for most likely to spend her next summer at sea level
   Mike: Sisko & Ebert Award -- six thumbs up
   Sue: Hemophiliac Award -- no explanation needed
   Micah: the Blair Award and...  Blair: the Micah Award
   Carmen: Just A Day at the Races: Pigs! Pigs to Indy!
   Josh: the Ivy League Menage a Trois Award, or, playing in the ivy
   Emily: the Field Map Regatta Award
   Nate: the Three Lemon Award -- he played the worst odds in Vegas and still won
   Tiffany: Fancy Pants Award -- silk any place, any time
   Rich: Grammy Award for his alarm clock, and an Oscar if he throws it away
   Paul: the Exploding Tent Award -- thanks for the show
   Sean: the Fugitive Award -- he'll need a pseudonym to rent skis again
   Pete: Most Attempts At Bribing TA's
   Andy: Mass Wasting Award for creating rockslides
   Jenn B: Good Morning Sunshine Award
   Joe: Utah Tour Guide Award
   Chris D: Sink the Minnow!
   Adam: the Doc Understudy Award
   Stacey: Bump in the Night Award for her nocturnal noises
   Chris M: The Eat a Peach Award

 Click on the thumbnails to view the image:

 

Alumni Field Camp 1995 Photos
       
T-shirt 1995
T-shirt back 1995
Van Hise's Rock
Baraboo, Wisconsin
Baraboo, another view Pipestone, Minnesota Badlands Emily tackles bentonite
Mt. Rushmore   Wind Cave Group field camp 1995
Devils Tower Wyodak coal mine Wyodak coal mine Wyodak coal mine
Line Creek Line Creek Elk Basin Elk Basin
Heart Mtn detachment Beartooth Pass Beartooth race Powder River Pass
Stillwater Stillwater, Mtn View mine area Stillwater, Mtn View mine Tetons
group at YBRA YBRA campus Great Salt Lake Flagstaff Peak, Alta
Albion Basin Alum news: ALTA and Emily C Mercurio More alums: Sean Gaffney and son Liam on Mt. Evans (14,000 ft +), Colorado

 

 


  

 

Field Camp 1996

Field Camp 1996

Students
Field course offerings in 1996 were Geosc 471, the pre-camp cross-country excursion, and Geosc 472, Field Geology.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact
Jen Bona  
Max Borella  
Heather Coutts  
Dave Falkenstern  
Tim Fives  
Amanda Heasley  
Leah Heine  
Mike Hile  
Diana Latta  
Kathryn Laukonen Brown  
Todd Lippman  
Andrew McIlhenny  
Kevin Myer  
Stacy Null  
Michael Panettieri  
Jason Ruf  
Ryan Shatt  
Michelle Smith  
Cobin Sunderman  
Jack Vasalani  

 

Faculty
  
Duff Gold, Dave Eggler

TAs
   Kevin (Doc) Hoover, Micah Weltner, Tiffani Heil, Theresa Miller-Kleiner, Gale Blackmer

Where They Stayed
   YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana; U of U, Salt Lake City; Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah; Richfield, Utah

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Rosebud, Salt Lake area surficial deposits, Gun Club quarry, Alta overthrust, Alta stock, Marysvale volcanics

Some of Dave Eggler's "Silly Awards"
   Stacy: Miss Congeniality for always having a smile on her face, even when she's on her behind
   Jack: Mr. Congeniality Award -- to accompany Stacy

   Mike P: Close Encounters Award -- most likely to be abducted by aliens (if he already hasn't been)
   Michelle: "Let's Talk" Award, and talk... and talk...
   Jen: The Lettuce and Tomato Award for being the biggest freak the town of Richfield's ever seen
   Max: "I Lost It All in the Desert" -- Brunton, hammer...
   Heather: Cellular One Award for best cellular customer in the middle of Utah
   Dave: the Grateful Dead Bear Award -- happy, cuddly, squishy
   Todd: Man of Few Words Award
   Kathryn: Polar Bear Award for someone who can be cold in Utah in the middle of summer
   Kevin: Postal Service Award for mailing the most rocks home
   Jason: the Buy U.S. Award for best U.S. producer of natural gas
   Cobin: the Phish Groupie Award -- an entire wardrobe of Phish shirts

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the pictures:

 

Alumni Field Camp 1996 Photos
       
T-shirt
T-shirt back
Baraboo
Barbican
Pipestone, MN Homestake Mine, SD Lead, SD  
Scenic, SD Devils Tower Wyodak coal mine, WY Powder River Pass
Line Creek Rosebud Rosebud Rosebud
Belfry, MT Mtn View, Stillwater Complex Roosevelt Lodge, YNP camp
Lewis River, YNP White Pine slide, Little Cottonwood Cardiff Peak, Alta Duff's Bench, Alta


 

 


  

 

 Field Camp 1997

Top of Flagstaff, in the Maxfield Formation, Alta, Utah. Field Camp 1997
Top of Flagstaff, in the Maxfield Formation, Alta, Utah

Students
Field course offerings in 1997 were Geosc 471, the pre-camp cross-country excursion, and Geosc 472, Field Geology.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact 
Ed Carpenetti  
Dan Cooper  
Tim Creyts  
Jonna Dudash  
Melissa Ehrlich  
Rick Henry  
Kazuhiro Kawakita  
Megan Kovach  
Jason Kronenwether  
Rick McKissock  
Karoline Mehalchic  
Dave Pinkus  
Kim Power Wishcamper  
Jon Rybacki  
Rich Sassaman  
Andy Savill  
Anne Schray  
Eileen Scott Brzoska  
Scott Steele  
Jim Stuby  
Pat Walsh  
Kim Ward  
Joy Wise  
Jarrod Yoder  

 

Faculty
  
Duff Gold, Dave Eggler

TAs
   Kevin (Doc) Hoover, Jenn Zuck Duerr, Andrew Sicree, Max Borella

Where They Stayed
   YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana; U of U, Salt Lake City; Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah; Monroe Hot Springs, Utah

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Rosebud, Salt Lake area surficial deposits, Gun Club quarry, Alta overthrust, Alta stock, Marysvale volcanics
 

1997 Field Camp Group Photo

Comments on Field Camp 1997

Kim Power Wishcamp: (2006) "Just stumbled onto the field camp alumni page. Talk about a trip down memory lane! I'm a State College native that jumped in with the '97 field school group as my little university didn't have a program. That summer was fantastic - I fell out of love with geology, but deeply in love with Montana, where I've been for the last 7 years! If there's a mailing list for alumni reunions, can you add my info to it? I'd love to trek over to Red Lodge for a get-together... maybe even take in some pig racing...."

Eileen Scott Brzoska: (2007) "Just wanted to drop you a line to let you know I found the field camp alumni page!   I
was in the 1997 class and since graduation have moved to Austin, Texas, and I am currently working with the Texas Water Development Board in their Wastewater Infrastructure division.  This was most certainly a trip down memory lane.  I'll forward some photos of the '97 class.  It's great to finally get in touch with some old friends!"

Click on the thumbs to enlarge: (thanks to Eileen Scott Brzoska for some of these)

 

Alumni Field Camp 1997 Photos
       
T-shirt
T-shirt back
Badlands, South Dakota
 
Duff and students in jail, Scenic, SD Wind Cave, SD Fetterman Monument, WY Chugwater Fm, WY
White Elephant Pegmatite, Black Hills  Tim, Anne, Karoline, Stuby Stillwater Complex Eileen, Duff, Anne, Karoline at Stillwater Beartooth Highway
Beartooth Highway Rick at the Heart Mtn glide plane Front of Fanshawe Lodge, YBRA Tetons
Tetons Gun Club Quarry Gun Club Quarry Big Cottonwood Canyon
Alta overthrust project Flagstaff, Alta Jonna crosses a stream (sort of), Alta overthrust project near Duff's Bench, Alta
near Flagstaff Mine, Alta near Flagstaff Mine, Alta Jenn near Flagstaff Mine, Alta Boys in the aspens, Alta overthrust project
Alta overthrust project Grizzly Gulch, Alta Grizzly Gulch, Alta Grizzly Gulch, Alta
Meghan and Jared taking strike and dip in the breccia pipe, Michigan-Utah area  Why a strike and dip? It's a BRECCIA pipe!

 

 

 Penn State Field Camp Alumni Reunion 1997

Field Camp Reunion 1997
An occasion to honor Duff Gold ("Duff Fest"), Field School 1966-1998
Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah

Attendee List
Name Contact
Duff & Jackie Gold gold@ems.psu.edu
John & Kerry Gold Tsakonas ktsakonas@mednet.ucla.edu
Max Borella '96  
Dave McMillan '87, TA'88  
Nick Kiusalaas '88 nkiusalaas@ConverseConsultants.com
Barbara Marin '90 bmarin@terratek.com
Steve Petsch '93 spetsch@geo.umass.edu
Shana Gordon '92  
Kathy Garland '81, TA'84  
Kevin (Doc) Hoover '89 dochoover@earthlink.net
Pete Chronowski '88  
Kim Fasching '82  
Andy Phelps '82 phelps@udri.udayton.edu
W Thomas (Tom) Goerold '78 tgoerold@lookoutmtn.com
Bob Klugowitz '89  
Gordon McCurry '80 mccurryg@cdm.com
Don Fisher (new FC director) fisher@geosc.psu.edu
Kirsten Laarkamp '92  
Tina Allen '88  
Sue and Joe Moore (MS72, PhD75) jmoore@egi.utah.edu
Rob Lux '82 rob.lux@dep.state.nj.us
Steve Urbanik '83 steve.urbanik@dep.state.nj.us
Andy Phelps '82 phelps@udri.udayton.edu
Brian Hoke '82  
Ed Juddo '82  
Randy Cygan late '70s (grad student)  
Joe Sadlik '82  
Diane Dopkin '86 diane.dopkin@emsus.com

 

Click on the thumbs to enlarge:

 

Alumni Field Camp Reunion 1997 Photos
       
Jacky & Duff Gold, field camp 1966-1998
Gold family
Joe Moore & pegmatite
Field Camp attendees
Field Camp attendees
Field Camp attendees
Field Camp attendees
Field Camp attendees
Field Camp attendees
(from left) Rob Lux, Ed Juddo, Joe Sadlik, Andy Phelps, Kim Fasching's younger sister, Kim Fasching, Steve Urbanik
Field Camp attendees
Field Camp attendees

 Field Camp 1998

Belfry, MT (Bat not shown). Front: Sandy, Pete, Karen B, Steph, Kristy, Michelle, Karen M, Michelle; Back: Chris, Fara, Tom, Don, Ben, Laura, Sarah, Paul, Drew, Mike, Eian. Credit: Pete Sak

Field Camp 1998

Students
Field course offerings in 1998 were Geosc 471, the pre-camp cross-country excursion, and Geosc 472, Field Geology.

 

Attendee List
Name Contact 
Drew Stolar  
Karen McLaughlin  
Chris Krugh  
Stephanie Brown  
Laura Belicka  
Kristy Kompanik  
Karen Bezusko  
Paul Rudalavage  
Fara Lourenso  
Tom Campitelli  
Sandy Martinka  
Ben Haith  
Sarah Schwede  
Mike Lang  
Joslin Kwan  
Michelle Mirigliano  
Eian Harm  

 

Faculty
  
Don Fisher, Duff Gold, Dave Eggler

TAs
   Kevin (Doc) Hoover, Pete Sak

Major Projects
   Elk Basin, Rosebud, Wildhorse (White Mtns), Alta overthrust, Alta pluton, Marysvale volcanics

Where They Stayed
   YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana; Wildhorse Campground, Pioneer Mountains, Idaho; Challis Hot Springs, Challis, Idaho; U of U, Salt Lake City; Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah; Monroe Hot Springs, Utah

Some of Dave and Pete's "silly awards":
  
Laura: Big Antlers Award
   Stephanie: ADA Award: she’ll finance every dentist’s greens fees
   Karen Bezusko: The Thumbs-Up Award for impenetrable optimism
   Tom: A Ralph Lauren Award for unsolicited advertising
   Chris: An American Standard Award for making carpet an acceptable receptacle
   Sandy: The American Express Award: don’t leave home without her
   Eian: CHiPS Award for evading Panch and John for so many days
   Paul: The Offroad Vehicle Association Award for taking a Honda where no car should go
   Kristy: The Clay Mineralogical Society Award for promoting the use of expanding clays
   Veggie Karen: The Montana Cattleman Association Award: home, home, on the range
   Drew: Good Morning Sunshine Award, for obvious reasons
   Sarah: The AC Delco Award
   Ben: The Michelle Award
   Michelle: The Ben Award
   Don, Dave, and Pete: Five hours of detention for drinking the wrong stuff in the wrong place

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the pictures: (thanks to Pete Sak for the photos)

 

Alumni Field Camp 1998 Photos
       
T-shirt
T-shirt back
At the beginning, Deike Bldg
South Dakota
Turistas Turistas Turistas Powder River Pass
camping Rosebud Rosebud Sunlight Basin
Line Creek Elk Basin Steph at Elk Basin YBRA classroom
YBRA classroom YBRA, photogeology groceries, Arco, ID Idaho
Pete was stuck here on the Burma Road Pocatello to Salt Lake City Wildhorse Campground Antonio's, Challis, ID  Oops, where's Sandy?
Kristy, too much map coloring Alta Alta Alta, snow sliding
Alta overthrust area Duff's Bench, Alta Flagstaff Mtn, Alta Alta recon project
Alta stock project Alta stock Twin Lakes Pass, Alta Alta Peruvian Lodge
Marysvale area

 

 


  

 

 YBRA Firepit 1998

Credit: Dustin Lutz, 2005

YBRA Firepit 1998

The Fire Pit at the Point was constructed by Penn State field school students and alumni in June 1998.  It is now one of the most popular gathering places in camp because of the view from the Point. It was constructed of unusual regional rocks, including Stillwater cumulates. The Fire Pit is normally used for its intended purpose only during the early summer, as fires are not allowed any time the fire danger exceeds "Low." At other times, an antique lantern is used as the "fire" to light gatherings.

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images of pit construction:

 

YBRA Firepit 1998 Photos
       
Pit Crew
YBRA Firepit 1998
YBRA Firepit 1998
YBRA Firepit 1998
YBRA Firepit 1998
YBRA Firepit 1998
YBRA Firepit 1998
Firepit in action, 2005

 Field Camp 2000

Belfry, MT (Bat not shown) Front: Australian guy, Heather, Kim; Back: Jim, Sandy, Erin, Lauren, Vicky, Greg, Chris, Matt, Doug, Justin, Rob, Don, Pete. Credit: Pete Sak

Field Camp 2000

Students
Field course offerings in 2000 were Geosc 471, the pre-camp cross-country excursion, and Geosc 472, Field Geology.

 

Attendee List
Name  Contact
Vicky Acker  
Jim Arthur  
Greg Baker  
Heather Buss  
Lauren Cooper  
Rob Higbee  
Kim Jenkins  
Chris Junium  
Erin Koch  
Justin Lottig  
Matt Machusik  
Sandy McCarthy  
Jim Myers  
Australian guy  

 

 

Faculty
  
Rudy Slingerland, Don Fisher, Dave Eggler

TA
   Pete Sak

Where They Stayed
   College of Eastern Utah, Price, Utah; YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana; Wildhorse Campground, Pioneer Mountains, Idaho; Challis Hot Springs, Challis, Idaho; Alta Peruvian Lodge, Alta, Utah

Major Projects
   Book Cliffs, Elk Basin, Rosebud, Wildhorse (White Mtns), Alta overthrust, Alta pluton

Click on the thumbs to enlarge: (thanks to Pete Sak for most of the photos)

 

Alumni Field Camp 2000 Photos
       
T-shirt
Back of T-shirt
Road trip
Dead Indian Hill
Hebgen Lake Craters of the Moon Craters Craters of the Moon
Lava tube, Craters of the Moon Wildhorse campground Wildhorse campground Wildhorse campground
Challis Hot Springs Challis Hot Springs joint? bedding? Crossing Boulder Creek, Pioneer Mtns hike
Jim grooves Sandy does too alta project Doug and Lauren  preface to a later Alta Peruvian contest
Alta project Alta project Don Fisher in the Ophir Duff's Bench, Alta project
Duff's Bench Alta stock Alta stock Alta recon project

 

 


  

 

 PSU Field Camp Reunion 2000

Group photo at the back porch of Fanshawe Lodge. Credit: Allen Spelman.
Top row: Kevin (Doc) Hoover, Alexandra Podobnikar, John Carman, Karen Wenrich; 7th row: Jacky Gold, Steve and Jackie Mellon, Karen and Allen Spelman, Dean Buckner; 6th row: Fred Block, Everett Kaukonen, Asenath LaRue, Art Montana, Patricia Smith, Linda Dutcher; 5th row: Larry Karasevic, Ted Gard, Anne-Marie Kaukonen, Bob and Mimi Ryder; 4th row: Joe and Kathy Halbig, Linda Gard, Eric and Janice Dahlberg, Dick Smith; 3rd row: Margery Langmuir, Marion Lavery, Oscar Huh, Bill Spence, Wayne Burnham, Judy and Dick Merkel; 2nd row: Don Langmuir, Anita Roberts, Wanda Huh, Mike Roberts, Sue Edelstein, Norma Burnham, Vicki Martin, Bob Martin; Front row: Norm Lavery, Patti Podwysocki, Ed and Betsy Beutner, Mel Podwysocki, Duff Gold.

Penn State Reunion 2000

Where and When
   YBRA, Red Lodge, Montana; August 3-6, 2000

Details
 
  This reunion was organized by Bob Ryder, Art Montana, Duff Gold, and Mel Podwysocki for graduate students and faculty of the 50s, 60s, and 70s.  It was only incidentally a field camp reunion.

Field trips and excursions
   Stillwater Complex, led by Duff Gold with presentations by John Dahy and John Childs of the Stillwater Mining Company; white-water rafting on the Stillwater River; Heart Mountain detachment, led by Ed Beutner; Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody

Attendee List
Name Contact
Fred Block (PhD72)  
Dean A Buckner (MS55)  
Lillian Berg and Becky Berg  
Ed (PhD68) and Betsey Beutner e_beutner@acad.fandm.edu
Wayne and Norma Burnham  
John Carman (PhD69)  
Eric (MS64, PhD67) and Janice Dahlberg  
Linda (MS67, PhD70) and Russ Dutcher dutchrus@siu.edu
Ted (PhD69) and Linda Gard  
Duff and Jacky Gold gold@ems.psu.edu
Joe (MS65, PhD69) and Kathy Halbig halbig@hawaii.edu
Halbig Kevin (Doc) Hoover (many FCs) dochoover@earthlink.net
Oscar (MS63, PhD68) and Wanda Huh oscar@antares.esl.lsu.edu
Everett (MS53) and Anne-Marie Kaukonen  
Larry Karasevich (MS80) lkaras@clearsail.net
Don and Margery Langmuir langmuir@ix.netcom.com
Norm (PhD68) and Marion Lavery  
Bob (MS66) and Vicky Martin bobm@eps.mcgill.ca
Steve (FC 75) & Jackie Mellon smellon@ch2m.com
Dick (MS67,PhD70) and Judy Merkel jmerkel@sni.net
Art Montana (PhD66, FC 70s) and Asenath LaRue montana@ess.ucla.edu
Mel (FCTA67, MS68, PhD74)and Patti Podwysocki mpodwyso@usgs.gov
Bob (PhD68) and Mimi Ryder rryder@usgs.gov
Mike (MS68, PhD74) and Anita Roberts  
Richard (MS66) and Patricia Smith  
Allen (PhD65) and Karen Spelman ARSpelman@aol.com
Bill Spence (PhD73) and Sue Edelstein billspence@worldnet.att.net
Karen Wenrich (FC68, MS71, PhD75) crystalsul@aol.com

 

Click on the thumbs to enlarge: (thanks to Duff Gold and Steve Mellon for the images)

 

Alumni Field Camp Reunion 2000 Photos
       
T-Shirt
Heart Mtn field trip
Heart Mtn field trip
Ed Beutner diagrams Heart Mtn detachment
Heart Mtn field trip
Mtn View section, Stillwater complex
J-M reef, Stillwater
J-M reef, Stillwater
layered anorthosites, Stillwater
J-M reef, Stillwater
inside lodge, YBRA
inside lodge, YBRA
inside lodge, YBRA
inside lodge, YBRA
inside lodge, YBRA
inside lodge, YBRA